Machine Learning (stat.ML)

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    The detection of gravitational waves with LIGO and Virgo requires a detailed understanding of the response of these instruments in the presence of environmental and instrumental noise. Of particular interest is the study of non-Gaussian noise transients known as glitches, since their high occurrence rate in LIGO/Virgo data can obscure or even mimic true gravitational wave signals. Therefore, successfully identifying and excising glitches is of utmost importance to detect and characterize gravitational waves. In this article, we present the first application of Deep Learning combined with Transfer Learning for glitch classification, using real data from LIGO's first discovery campaign labeled by Gravity Spy, showing that knowledge from pre-trained models for real-world object recognition can be transferred for classifying spectrograms of glitches. We demonstrate that this method enables the optimal use of very deep convolutional neural networks for glitch classification given small unbalanced training datasets, significantly reduces the training time, and achieves state-of-the-art accuracy above 98.8%. Once trained via transfer learning, we show that the networks can be truncated and used as feature extractors for unsupervised clustering to automatically group new classes of glitches. This feature is of critical importance to identify and remove new types of glitches which will occur as the LIGO/Virgo detectors gradually attain design sensitivity.
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    Conditional variants of Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs), known as cGANs, are generative models that can produce data samples ($x$) conditioned on both latent variables ($z$) and known auxiliary information ($c$). Another GAN variant, Bidirectional GAN (BiGAN) is a recently developed framework for learning the inverse mapping from $x$ to $z$ through an encoder trained simultaneously with the generator and the discriminator of an unconditional GAN. We propose the Bidirectional Conditional GAN (BCGAN), which combines cGANs and BiGANs into a single framework with an encoder that learns inverse mappings from $x$ to both $z$ and $c$, trained simultaneously with the conditional generator and discriminator in an end-to-end setting. We present crucial techniques for training BCGANs, which incorporate an extrinsic factor loss along with an associated dynamically-tuned importance weight. As compared to other encoder-based GANs, BCGANs not only encode $c$ more accurately but also utilize $z$ and $c$ more effectively and in a more disentangled way to generate data samples.
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    The Morris Water Maze is commonly used in behavioural neuroscience for the study of spatial learning with rodents. Over the years, various methods of analysing rodent data collected in this task have been proposed. These methods span from classical performance measurements (e.g. escape latency, rodent speed, quadrant preference) to more sophisticated methods of categorisation which classify the animal swimming path into behavioural classes known as strategies. Classification techniques provide additional insight in relation to the actual animal behaviours but still only a limited amount of studies utilise them mainly because they highly depend on machine learning knowledge. We have previously demonstrated that the animals implement various strategies and by classifying whole trajectories can lead to the loss of important information. In this work, we developed a generalised and robust classification methodology which implements majority voting to boost the classification performance and successfully nullify the need of manual tuning. Based on this framework, we built a complete software, capable of performing the full analysis described in this paper. The software provides an easy to use graphical user interface (GUI) through which users can enter their trajectory data, segment and label them and finally generate reports and figures of the results.
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    Pairwise "same-cluster" queries are one of the most widely used forms of supervision in semi-supervised clustering. However, it is impractical to ask human oracles to answer every query correctly. In this paper, we study the influence of allowing "not-sure" answers from a weak oracle and propose an effective algorithm to handle such uncertainties in query responses. Two realistic weak oracle models are considered where ambiguity in answering depends on the distance between two points. We show that a small query complexity is adequate for effective clustering with high probability by providing better pairs to the weak oracle. Experimental results on synthetic and real data show the effectiveness of our approach in overcoming supervision uncertainties and yielding high quality clusters.
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    A core aspect of human intelligence is the ability to learn new tasks quickly and switch between them flexibly. Here, we describe a modular continual reinforcement learning paradigm inspired by these abilities. We first introduce a visual interaction environment that allows many types of tasks to be unified in a single framework. We then describe a reward map prediction scheme that learns new tasks robustly in the very large state and action spaces required by such an environment. We investigate how properties of module architecture influence efficiency of task learning, showing that a module motif incorporating specific design principles (e.g. early bottlenecks, low-order polynomial nonlinearities, and symmetry) significantly outperforms more standard neural network motifs, needing fewer training examples and fewer neurons to achieve high levels of performance. Finally, we present a meta-controller architecture for task switching based on a dynamic neural voting scheme, which allows new modules to use information learned from previously-seen tasks to substantially improve their own learning efficiency.
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    Transparency, user trust, and human comprehension are popular ethical motivations for interpretable machine learning. In support of these goals, researchers evaluate model explanation performance using humans and real world applications. This alone presents a challenge in many areas of artificial intelligence. In this position paper, we propose a distinction between descriptive and persuasive explanations. We discuss reasoning suggesting that functional interpretability may be correlated with cognitive function and user preferences. If this is indeed the case, evaluation and optimization using functional metrics could perpetuate implicit cognitive bias in explanations that threaten transparency. Finally, we propose two potential research directions to disambiguate cognitive function and explanation models, retaining control over the tradeoff between accuracy and interpretability.
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    We study a classification problem where each feature can be acquired for a cost and the goal is to optimize the trade-off between classification precision and the total feature cost. We frame the problem as a sequential decision-making problem, where we classify one sample in each episode. At each step, an agent can use values of acquired features to decide whether to purchase another one or whether to classify the sample. We use vanilla Double Deep Q-learning, a standard reinforcement learning technique, to find a classification policy. We show that this generic approach outperforms Adapt-Gbrt, currently the best-performing algorithm developed specifically for classification with costly features.
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    By lifting the ReLU function into a higher dimensional space, we develop a smooth multi-convex formulation for training feed-forward deep neural networks (DNNs). This allows us to develop a block coordinate descent (BCD) training algorithm consisting of a sequence of numerically well-behaved convex optimizations. Using ideas from proximal point methods in convex analysis, we prove that this BCD algorithm will converge globally to a stationary point with R-linear convergence rate of order one. In experiments with the MNIST database, DNNs trained with this BCD algorithm consistently yielded better test-set error rates than identical DNN architectures trained via all the stochastic gradient descent (SGD) variants in the Caffe toolbox.
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    In this paper we document our experiences with developing speech recognition for medical transcription - a system that automatically transcribes doctor-patient conversations. Towards this goal, we built a system along two different methodological lines - a Connectionist Temporal Classification (CTC) phoneme based model and a Listen Attend and Spell (LAS) grapheme based model. To train these models we used a corpus of anonymized conversations representing approximately 14,000 hours of speech. Because of noisy transcripts and alignments in the corpus, a significant amount of effort was invested in data cleaning issues. We describe a two-stage strategy we followed for segmenting the data. The data cleanup and development of a matched language model was essential to the success of the CTC based models. The LAS based models, however were found to be resilient to alignment and transcript noise and did not require the use of language models. CTC models were able to achieve a word error rate of 20.1%, and the LAS models were able to achieve 18.3%. Our analysis shows that both models perform well on important medical utterances and therefore can be practical for transcribing medical conversations.
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    We consider the classical problem of control of linear systems with quadratic cost. When the true system dynamics are unknown, an adaptive policy is required for learning the model parameters and planning a control policy simultaneously. Addressing this trade-off between accurate estimation and good control represents the main challenge in the area of adaptive control. Another important issue is to prevent the system becoming destabilized due to lack of knowledge of its dynamics. Asymptotically optimal approaches have been extensively studied in the literature, but there are very few non-asymptotic results which also do not provide a comprehensive treatment of the problem. In this work, we establish finite time high probability regret bounds that are optimal up to logarithmic factors. We also provide high probability guarantees for a stabilization algorithm based on random linear feedbacks. The results are obtained under very mild assumptions, requiring: (i) stabilizability of the matrices encoding the system's dynamics, and (ii) degree of heaviness of the noise distribution. To derive our results, we also introduce a number of new concepts and technical tools.
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    We propose a novel distributed inference algorithm for continuous graphical models by extending Stein variational gradient descent (SVGD) to leverage the Markov dependency structure of the distribution of interest. The idea is to use a set of local kernel functions over the Markov blanket of each node, which alleviates the problem of the curse of high dimensionality and simultaneously yields a distributed algorithm for decentralized inference tasks. We justify our method with theoretical analysis and show that the use of local kernels can be viewed as a new type of localized approximation that matches the target distribution on the conditional distributions of each node over its Markov blanket. Our empirical results demonstrate that our method outperforms a variety of baselines including standard MCMC and particle message passing methods.
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    This paper investigates, from information theoretic grounds, a learning problem based on the principle that any regularity in a given dataset can be exploited to extract compact features from data, i.e., using fewer bits than needed to fully describe the data itself, in order to build meaningful representations of a relevant content (multiple labels). We begin by introducing the noisy lossy source coding paradigm with the log-loss fidelity criterion which provides the fundamental tradeoffs between the \emphcross-entropy loss (average risk) and the information rate of the features (model complexity). Our approach allows an information theoretic formulation of the \emphmulti-task learning (MTL) problem which is a supervised learning framework in which the prediction models for several related tasks are learned jointly from common representations to achieve better generalization performance. Then, we present an iterative algorithm for computing the optimal tradeoffs and its global convergence is proven provided that some conditions hold. An important property of this algorithm is that it provides a natural safeguard against overfitting, because it minimizes the average risk taking into account a penalization induced by the model complexity. Remarkably, empirical results illustrate that there exists an optimal information rate minimizing the \emphexcess risk which depends on the nature and the amount of available training data. An application to hierarchical text categorization is also investigated, extending previous works.
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    Following related work in law and policy, two notions of prejudice have come to shape the study of fairness in algorithmic decision-making. Algorithms exhibit disparate treatment if they formally treat people differently according to a protected characteristic, like race, or if they intentionally discriminate (even if via proxy variables). Algorithms exhibit disparate impact if they affect subgroups differently. Disparate impact can arise unintentionally and absent disparate treatment. The natural way to reduce disparate impact would be to apply disparate treatment in favor of the disadvantaged group, i.e. to apply affirmative action. However, owing to the practice's contested legal status, several papers have proposed trying to eliminate both forms of unfairness simultaneously, introducing a family of algorithms that we denote disparate learning processes (DLPs). These processes incorporate the protected characteristic as an input to the learning algorithm (e.g.~via a regularizer) but produce a model that cannot directly access the protected characteristic as an input. In this paper, we make the following arguments: (i) DLPs can be functionally equivalent to disparate treatment, and thus should carry the same legal status; (ii) when the protected characteristic is redundantly encoded in the nonsensitive features, DLPs can exactly apply any disparate treatment protocol; (iii) when the characteristic is only partially encoded, DLPs may induce within-class discrimination. Finally, we argue the normative point that rather than masking efforts towards proportional representation, it is preferable to undertake them transparently.
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    The variational autoencoder (VAE) is a popular probabilistic generative model. However, one shortcoming of VAEs is that the latent variables cannot be discrete, which makes it difficult to generate data from different modes of a distribution. Here, we propose an extension of the VAE framework that incorporates a classifier to infer the discrete class of the modeled data. To model sequential data, we can combine our Classifying VAE with a recurrent neural network such as an LSTM. We apply this model to algorithmic music generation, where our model learns to generate musical sequences in different keys. Most previous work in this area avoids modeling key by transposing data into only one or two keys, as opposed to the 10+ different keys in the original music. We show that our Classifying VAE and Classifying VAE+LSTM models outperform the corresponding non-classifying models in generating musical samples that stay in key. This benefit is especially apparent when trained on untransposed music data in the original keys.
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    This paper presents a sequential randomized lowrank matrix factorization approach for incrementally predicting values of an unknown function at test points using the Gaussian Processes framework. It is well-known that in the Gaussian processes framework, the computational bottlenecks are the inversion of the (regularized) kernel matrix and the computation of the hyper-parameters defining the kernel. The main contributions of this paper are two-fold. First, we formalize an approach to compute the inverse of the kernel matrix using randomized matrix factorization algorithms in a streaming scenario, i.e., data is generated incrementally over time. The metrics of accuracy and computational efficiency of the proposed method are compared against a batch approach based on use of randomized matrix factorization and an existing streaming approach based on approximating the Gaussian process by a finite set of basis vectors. Second, we extend the sequential factorization approach to a class of kernel functions for which the hyperparameters can be efficiently optimized. All results are demonstrated on two publicly available datasets.
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    Visual Domain Adaptation is a problem of immense importance in computer vision. Previous approaches showcase the inability of even deep neural networks to learn informative representations across domain shift. This problem is more severe for tasks where acquiring hand labeled data is extremely hard and tedious. In this work, we focus on adapting the representations learned by segmentation networks across synthetic and real domains. Contrary to previous approaches that use a simple adversarial objective or superpixel information to aid the process, we propose an approach based on Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs) that brings the embeddings closer in the learned feature space. To showcase the generality and scalability of our approach, we show that we can achieve state of the art results on two challenging scenarios of synthetic to real domain adaptation. Additional exploratory experiments show that our approach: (1) generalizes to unseen domains and (2) results in improved alignment of source and target distributions.
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    Understanding the global optimality in deep learning (DL) has been attracting more and more attention recently. Conventional DL solvers, however, have not been developed intentionally to seek for such global optimality. In this paper we propose a novel approximation algorithm, BPGrad, towards optimizing deep models globally via branch and pruning. Our BPGrad algorithm is based on the assumption of Lipschitz continuity in DL, and as a result it can adaptively determine the step size for current gradient given the history of previous updates, wherein theoretically no smaller steps can achieve the global optimality. We prove that, by repeating such branch-and-pruning procedure, we can locate the global optimality within finite iterations. Empirically an efficient solver based on BPGrad for DL is proposed as well, and it outperforms conventional DL solvers such as Adagrad, Adadelta, RMSProp, and Adam in the tasks of object recognition, detection, and segmentation.
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    We present a robust generalization of the synthetic control method for comparative case studies. Like the classical method, we present an algorithm to estimate the unobservable counterfactual of a treatment unit. A distinguishing feature of our algorithm is that of de-noising the data matrix via singular value thresholding, which renders our approach robust in multiple facets: it automatically identifies a good subset of donors, overcomes the challenges of missing data, and continues to work well in settings where covariate information may not be provided. To begin, we establish the condition under which the fundamental assumption in synthetic control-like approaches holds, i.e. when the linear relationship between the treatment unit and the donor pool prevails in both the pre- and post-intervention periods. We provide the first finite sample analysis for a broader class of models, the Latent Variable Model, in contrast to Factor Models previously considered in the literature. Further, we show that our de-noising procedure accurately imputes missing entries, producing a consistent estimator of the underlying signal matrix provided $p = \Omega( T^{-1 + \zeta})$ for some $\zeta > 0$; here, $p$ is the fraction of observed data and $T$ is the time interval of interest. Under the same setting, we prove that the mean-squared-error (MSE) in our prediction estimation scales as $O(\sigma^2/p + 1/\sqrt{T})$, where $\sigma^2$ is the noise variance. Using a data aggregation method, we show that the MSE can be made as small as $O(T^{-1/2+\gamma})$ for any $\gamma \in (0, 1/2)$, leading to a consistent estimator. We also introduce a Bayesian framework to quantify the model uncertainty through posterior probabilities. Our experiments, using both real-world and synthetic datasets, demonstrate that our robust generalization yields an improvement over the classical synthetic control method.
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    Deep learning is a hierarchical inference method formed by subsequent multiple layers of learning able to more efficiently describe complex relationships. In this work, Deep Gaussian Mixture Models are introduced and discussed. A Deep Gaussian Mixture model (DGMM) is a network of multiple layers of latent variables, where, at each layer, the variables follow a mixture of Gaussian distributions. Thus, the deep mixture model consists of a set of nested mixtures of linear models, which globally provide a nonlinear model able to describe the data in a very flexible way. In order to avoid overparameterized solutions, dimension reduction by factor models can be applied at each layer of the architecture thus resulting in deep mixtures of factor analysers.
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    In this paper, we present our approach to solve a physics-based reinforcement learning challenge "Learning to Run" with objective to train physiologically-based human model to navigate a complex obstacle course as quickly as possible. The environment is computationally expensive, has a high-dimensional continuous action space and is stochastic. We benchmark state of the art policy-gradient methods and test several improvements, such as layer normalization, parameter noise, action and state reflecting, to stabilize training and improve its sample-efficiency. We found that the Deep Deterministic Policy Gradient method is the most efficient method for this environment and the improvements we have introduced help to stabilize training. Learned models are able to generalize to new physical scenarios, e.g. different obstacle courses.
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    In this paper we demonstrate how genetic algorithms can be used to reverse engineer an evaluation function's parameters for computer chess. Our results show that using an appropriate expert (or mentor), we can evolve a program that is on par with top tournament-playing chess programs, outperforming a two-time World Computer Chess Champion. This performance gain is achieved by evolving a program that mimics the behavior of a superior expert. The resulting evaluation function of the evolved program consists of a much smaller number of parameters than the expert's. The extended experimental results provided in this paper include a report of our successful participation in the 2008 World Computer Chess Championship. In principle, our expert-driven approach could be used in a wide range of problems for which appropriate experts are available.
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    This paper demonstrates the use of genetic algorithms for evolving a grandmaster-level evaluation function for a chess program. This is achieved by combining supervised and unsupervised learning. In the supervised learning phase the organisms are evolved to mimic the behavior of human grandmasters, and in the unsupervised learning phase these evolved organisms are further improved upon by means of coevolution. While past attempts succeeded in creating a grandmaster-level program by mimicking the behavior of existing computer chess programs, this paper presents the first successful attempt at evolving a state-of-the-art evaluation function by learning only from databases of games played by humans. Our results demonstrate that the evolved program outperforms a two-time World Computer Chess Champion.
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    In this paper we demonstrate how genetic algorithms can be used to reverse engineer an evaluation function's parameters for computer chess. Our results show that using an appropriate mentor, we can evolve a program that is on par with top tournament-playing chess programs, outperforming a two-time World Computer Chess Champion. This performance gain is achieved by evolving a program with a smaller number of parameters in its evaluation function to mimic the behavior of a superior mentor which uses a more extensive evaluation function. In principle, our mentor-assisted approach could be used in a wide range of problems for which appropriate mentors are available.
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    In this paper, we consider a class of possibly nonconvex, nonsmooth and non-Lipschitz optimization problems arising in many contemporary applications such as machine learning, variable selection and image processing. To solve this class of problems, we propose a proximal gradient method with extrapolation and line search (PGels). This method is developed based on a special potential function and successfully incorporates both extrapolation and non-monotone line search, which are two simple and efficient accelerating techniques for the proximal gradient method. Thanks to the line search, this method allows more flexibilities in choosing the extrapolation parameters and updates them adaptively at each iteration if a certain line search criterion is not satisfied. Moreover, with proper choices of parameters, our PGels reduces to many existing algorithms. We also show that, under some mild conditions, our line search criterion is well defined and any cluster point of the sequence generated by PGels is a stationary point of our problem. In addition, by assuming the Kurdyka-Łojasiewicz exponent of the objective in our problem, we further analyze the local convergence rate of two special cases of PGels, including the widely used non-monotone proximal gradient method as one case. Finally, we conduct some numerical experiments for solving the $\ell_1$ regularized logistic regression problem and the $\ell_{1\text{-}2}$ regularized least squares problem. Our numerical results illustrate the efficiency of PGels and show the potential advantage of combining two accelerating techniques.
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    We present FluidNets, an approach to automate the design of neural network structures. FluidNets iteratively shrinks and expands a network, shrinking via a resource-weighted sparsifying regularizer on activations and expanding via a uniform multiplicative factor on all layers. In contrast to previous approaches, our method is scalable to large networks, adaptable to specific resource constraints (e.g. the number of floating-point operations per inference), and capable of increasing the network's performance. When applied to standard network architectures on a wide variety of datasets, our approach discovers novel structures in each domain, obtaining higher performance while respecting the resource constraint.
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    Most multi-class classifiers make their prediction for a test sample by scoring the classes and selecting the one with the highest score. Analyzing these prediction scores is useful to understand the classifier behavior and to assess its reliability. We present an interactive visualization that facilitates per-class analysis of these scores. Our system, called Classilist, enables relating these scores to the classification correctness and to the underlying samples and their features. We illustrate how such analysis reveals varying behavior of different classifiers. Classilist is available for use online, along with source code, video tutorials, and plugins for R, RapidMiner, and KNIME at https://katehara.github.io/classilist-site/.
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    Additive models, such as produced by gradient boosting, and full interaction models, such as classification and regression trees (CART), are widely used algorithms that have been investigated largely in isolation. We show that these models exist along a spectrum, revealing never-before-known connections between these two approaches. This paper introduces a novel technique called tree-structured boosting for creating a single decision tree, and shows that this method can produce models equivalent to CART or gradient boosted stumps at the extremes by varying a single parameter. Although tree-structured boosting is designed primarily to provide both the model interpretability and predictive performance needed for high-stake applications like medicine, it also can produce decision trees represented by hybrid models between CART and boosted stumps that can outperform either of these approaches.
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    We introduce MinimalRNN, a new recurrent neural network architecture that achieves comparable performance as the popular gated RNNs with a simplified structure. It employs minimal updates within RNN, which not only leads to efficient learning and testing but more importantly better interpretability and trainability. We demonstrate that by endorsing the more restrictive update rule, MinimalRNN learns disentangled RNN states. We further examine the learning dynamics of different RNN structures using input-output Jacobians, and show that MinimalRNN is able to capture longer range dependencies than existing RNN architectures.
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    Distributed algorithms are often beset by the straggler effect, where the slowest compute nodes in the system dictate the overall running time. Coding-theoretic techniques have been recently proposed to mitigate stragglers via algorithmic redundancy. Prior work in coded computation and gradient coding has mainly focused on exact recovery of the desired output. However, slightly inexact solutions can be acceptable in applications that are robust to noise, such as model training via gradient-based algorithms. In this work, we present computationally simple gradient codes based on sparse graphs that guarantee fast and approximately accurate distributed computation. We demonstrate that sacrificing a small amount of accuracy can significantly increase algorithmic robustness to stragglers.
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    Error backpropagation is a highly effective mechanism for learning high-quality hierarchical features in deep networks. Updating the features or weights in one layer, however, requires waiting for the propagation of error signals from higher layers. Learning using delayed and non-local errors makes it hard to reconcile backpropagation with the learning mechanisms observed in biological neural networks as it requires the neurons to maintain a memory of the input long enough until the higher-layer errors arrive. In this paper, we propose an alternative learning mechanism where errors are generated locally in each layer using fixed, random auxiliary classifiers. Lower layers could thus be trained independently of higher layers and training could either proceed layer by layer, or simultaneously in all layers using local error information. We address biological plausibility concerns such as weight symmetry requirements and show that the proposed learning mechanism based on fixed, broad, and random tuning of each neuron to the classification categories outperforms the biologically-motivated feedback alignment learning technique on the MNIST, CIFAR10, and SVHN datasets, approaching the performance of standard backpropagation. Our approach highlights a potential biological mechanism for the supervised, or task-dependent, learning of feature hierarchies. In addition, we show that it is well suited for learning deep networks in custom hardware where it can drastically reduce memory traffic and data communication overheads.
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    In this paper we answer the following question: what is the infinitesimal generator of the diffusion process defined by a kernel that is normalized such that it is bi-stochastic with respect to a specified measure? More precisely, under the assumption that data is sampled from a Riemannian manifold we determine how the resulting infinitesimal generator depends on the potentially nonuniform distribution of the sample points, and the specified measure for the bi-stochastic normalization. In a special case, we demonstrate a connection to the heat kernel. We consider both the case where only a single data set is given, and the case where a data set and a reference set are given. The spectral theory of the constructed operators is studied, and Nyström extension formulas for the gradients of the eigenfunctions are computed. Applications to discrete point sets and manifold learning are discussed.
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    Epanechnikov Mean Shift is a simple yet empirically very effective algorithm for clustering. It localizes the centroids of data clusters via estimating modes of the probability distribution that generates the data points, using the `optimal' Epanechnikov kernel density estimator. However, since the procedure involves non-smooth kernel density functions, the convergence behavior of Epanechnikov mean shift lacks theoretical support as of this writing---most of the existing analyses are based on smooth functions and thus cannot be applied to Epanechnikov Mean Shift. In this work, we first show that the original Epanechnikov Mean Shift may indeed terminate at a non-critical point, due to the non-smoothness nature. Based on our analysis, we propose a simple remedy to fix it. The modified Epanechnikov Mean Shift is guaranteed to terminate at a local maximum of the estimated density, which corresponds to a cluster centroid, within a finite number of iterations. We also propose a way to avoid running the Mean Shift iterates from every data point, while maintaining good clustering accuracies under non-overlapping spherical Gaussian mixture models. This further pushes Epanechnikov Mean Shift to handle very large and high-dimensional data sets. Experiments show surprisingly good performance compared to the Lloyd's K-means algorithm and the EM algorithm.
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    Many popular random partition models, such as the Chinese restaurant process and its two-parameter extension, fall in the class of exchangeable random partitions, and have found wide applicability in model-based clustering, population genetics, ecology or network analysis. While the exchangeability assumption is sensible in many cases, it has some strong implications. In particular, Kingman's representation theorem implies that the size of the clusters necessarily grows linearly with the sample size; this feature may be undesirable for some applications, as recently pointed out by Miller et al. (2015). We present here a flexible class of non-exchangeable random partition models which are able to generate partitions whose cluster sizes grow sublinearly with the sample size, and where the growth rate is controlled by one parameter. Along with this result, we provide the asymptotic behaviour of the number of clusters of a given size, and show that the model can exhibit a power-law behavior, controlled by another parameter. The construction is based on completely random measures and a Poisson embedding of the random partition, and inference is performed using a Sequential Monte Carlo algorithm. Additionally, we show how the model can also be directly used to generate sparse multigraphs with power-law degree distributions and degree sequences with sublinear growth. Finally, experiments on real datasets emphasize the usefulness of the approach compared to a two-parameter Chinese restaurant process.
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    In machine learning or statistics, it is often desirable to reduce the dimensionality of high dimensional data. We propose to obtain the low dimensional embedding coordinates as the eigenvectors of a positive semi-definite kernel matrix. This kernel matrix is the solution of a semi-definite program promoting a low rank solution and defined with the help of a diffusion kernel. Besides, we also discuss an infinite dimensional analogue of the same semi-definite program. From a practical perspective, a main feature of our approach is the existence of a non-linear out-of-sample extension formula of the embedding coordinates that we call a projected Nyström approximation. This extension formula yields an extension of the kernel matrix to a data-dependent Mercer kernel function. Although the semi-definite program may be solved directly, we propose another strategy based on a rank constrained formulation solved thanks to a projected power method algorithm followed by a singular value decomposition. This strategy allows for a reduced computational time.
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    Non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) is a technique for finding latent representations of data. The method has been applied to corpora to construct topic models. However, NMF has likelihood assumptions which are often violated by real document corpora. We present a double parametric bootstrap test for evaluating the fit of an NMF-based topic model based on the duality of the KL divergence and Poisson maximum likelihood estimation. The test correctly identifies whether a topic model based on an NMF approach yields reliable results in simulated and real data.
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    Contextual bandit algorithms seek to learn a personalized treatment assignment policy, balancing exploration against exploitation. Although a number of algorithms have been proposed, there is little guidance available for applied researchers to select among various approaches. Motivated by the econometrics and statistics literatures on causal effects estimation, we study a new consideration to the exploration vs. exploitation framework, which is that the way exploration is conducted in the present may contribute to the bias and variance in the potential outcome model estimation in subsequent stages of learning. We leverage parametric and non-parametric statistical estimation methods and causal effect estimation methods in order to propose new contextual bandit designs. Through a variety of simulations, we show how alternative design choices impact the learning performance and provide insights on why we observe these effects.
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    This paper extends the earlier work on an oscillating error correction technique. Specifically, it extends the design to include further corrections, by adding new layers to the classifier through a branching method. This technique is still consistent with earlier work and also neural networks in general. With this extended design, the classifier can now achieve the high levels of accuracy reported previously.
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    This paper presents a novel decentralized high-dimensional Bayesian optimization (DEC-HBO) algorithm that, in contrast to existing HBO algorithms, can exploit the interdependent effects of various input components on the output of the unknown objective function f for boosting the BO performance and still preserve scalability in the number of input dimensions without requiring prior knowledge or the existence of a low (effective) dimension of the input space. To realize this, we propose a sparse yet rich factor graph representation of f to be exploited for designing an acquisition function that can be similarly represented by a sparse factor graph and hence be efficiently optimized in a decentralized manner using distributed message passing. Despite richly characterizing the interdependent effects of the input components on the output of f with a factor graph, DEC-HBO can still guarantee no-regret performance asymptotically. Empirical evaluation on synthetic and real-world experiments (e.g., sparse Gaussian process model with 1811 hyperparameters) shows that DEC-HBO outperforms the state-of-the-art HBO algorithms.
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    In this paper, we made an extension to the convergence analysis of the dynamics of two-layered bias-free networks with one $ReLU$ output. We took into consideration two popular regularization terms: the $\ell_1$ and $\ell_2$ norm of the parameter vector $w$, and added it to the square loss function with coefficient $\lambda/2$. We proved that when $\lambda$ is small, the weight vector $w$ converges to the optimal solution $\hat{w}$ (with respect to the new loss function) with probability $\geq (1-\varepsilon)(1-A_d)/2$ under random initiations in a sphere centered at the origin, where $\varepsilon$ is a small value and $A_d$ is a constant. Numerical experiments including phase diagrams and repeated simulations verified our theory.
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    Spatial understanding is a fundamental problem with wide-reaching real-world applications. The representation of spatial knowledge is often modeled with spatial templates, i.e., regions of acceptability of two objects under an explicit spatial relationship (e.g., "on", "below", etc.). In contrast with prior work that restricts spatial templates to explicit spatial prepositions (e.g., "glass on table"), here we extend this concept to implicit spatial language, i.e., those relationships (generally actions) for which the spatial arrangement of the objects is only implicitly implied (e.g., "man riding horse"). In contrast with explicit relationships, predicting spatial arrangements from implicit spatial language requires significant common sense spatial understanding. Here, we introduce the task of predicting spatial templates for two objects under a relationship, which can be seen as a spatial question-answering task with a (2D) continuous output ("where is the man w.r.t. a horse when the man is walking the horse?"). We present two simple neural-based models that leverage annotated images and structured text to learn this task. The good performance of these models reveals that spatial locations are to a large extent predictable from implicit spatial language. Crucially, the models attain similar performance in a challenging generalized setting, where the object-relation-object combinations (e.g.,"man walking dog") have never been seen before. Next, we go one step further by presenting the models with unseen objects (e.g., "dog"). In this scenario, we show that leveraging word embeddings enables the models to output accurate spatial predictions, proving that the models acquire solid common sense spatial knowledge allowing for such generalization.
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    Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods such as Gibbs sampling are finding widespread use in applied statistics and machine learning. These often lead to difficult computational problems, which are increasingly being solved on parallel and distributed systems such as compute clusters. Recent work has proposed running iterative algorithms such as gradient descent and MCMC in parallel asynchronously for increased performance, with good empirical results in certain problems. Unfortunately, for MCMC this parallelization technique requires new convergence theory, as it has been explicitly demonstrated to lead to divergence on some examples. Recent theory on Asynchronous Gibbs sampling describes why these algorithms can fail, and provides a way to alter them to make them converge. In this article, we describe how to apply this theory in a generic setting, to understand the asynchronous behavior of any MCMC algorithm, including those implemented using parameter servers, and those not based on Gibbs sampling.
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    We revisit the classification problem and focus on nonlinear methods for classification on manifolds. For multivariate datasets lying on an embedded nonlinear Riemannian manifold within the higher-dimensional space, our aim is to acquire a classification boundary between the classes with labels. Motivated by the principal flow [Panaretos, Pham and Yao, 2014], a curve that moves along a path of the maximum variation of the data, we introduce the principal boundary. From the classification perspective, the principal boundary is defined as an optimal curve that moves in between the principal flows traced out from two classes of the data, and at any point on the boundary, it maximizes the margin between the two classes. We estimate the boundary in quality with its direction supervised by the two principal flows. We show that the principal boundary yields the usual decision boundary found by the support vector machine, in the sense that locally, the two boundaries coincide. By means of examples, we illustrate how to find, use and interpret the principal boundary.

Recent comments

Noon van der Silk Nov 01 2017 21:51 UTC

This is an awesome paper; great work! :)

Noon van der Silk Mar 08 2017 04:45 UTC

I feel that while the proliferation of GUNs is unquestionable a good idea, there are many unsupervised networks out there that might use this technology in dangerous ways. Do you think Indifferential-Privacy networks are the answer? Also I fear that the extremist binary networks should be banned ent

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