Machine Learning (stat.ML)

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    We study the least squares regression problem \beginalign* \min_\Theta ∈\mathcalS_⊙D,R \|A\Theta-b\|_2, \endalign* where $\mathcal{S}_{\odot D,R}$ is the set of $\Theta$ for which $\Theta = \sum_{r=1}^{R} \theta_1^{(r)} \circ \cdots \circ \theta_D^{(r)}$ for vectors $\theta_d^{(r)} \in \mathbb{R}^{p_d}$ for all $r \in [R]$ and $d \in [D]$, and $\circ$ denotes the outer product of vectors. That is, $\Theta$ is a low-dimensional, low-rank tensor. This is motivated by the fact that the number of parameters in $\Theta$ is only $R \cdot \sum_{d=1}^D p_d$, which is significantly smaller than the $\prod_{d=1}^{D} p_d$ number of parameters in ordinary least squares regression. We consider the above CP decomposition model of tensors $\Theta$, as well as the Tucker decomposition. For both models we show how to apply data dimensionality reduction techniques based on \it sparse random projections $\Phi \in \mathbb{R}^{m \times n}$, with $m \ll n$, to reduce the problem to a much smaller problem $\min_{\Theta} \|\Phi A \Theta - \Phi b\|_2$, for which if $\Theta'$ is a near-optimum to the smaller problem, then it is also a near optimum to the original problem. We obtain significantly smaller dimension and sparsity in $\Phi$ than is possible for ordinary least squares regression, and we also provide a number of numerical simulations supporting our theory.
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    Black box variational inference (BBVI) with reparameterization gradients triggered the exploration of divergence measures other than the Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence, such as alpha divergences. These divergences can be tuned to be more mass-covering (preventing overfitting in complex models), but are also often harder to optimize using Monte-Carlo gradients. In this paper, we view BBVI with generalized divergences as a form of biased importance sampling. The choice of divergence determines a bias-variance tradeoff between the tightness of the bound (low bias) and the variance of its gradient estimators. Drawing on variational perturbation theory of statistical physics, we use these insights to construct a new variational bound which is tighter than the KL bound and more mass covering. Compared to alpha-divergences, its reparameterization gradients have a lower variance. We show in several experiments on Gaussian Processes and Variational Autoencoders that the resulting posterior covariances are closer to the true posterior and lead to higher likelihoods on held-out data.
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    We present an approach to automate the process of discovering optimization methods, with a focus on deep learning architectures. We train a Recurrent Neural Network controller to generate a string in a domain specific language that describes a mathematical update equation based on a list of primitive functions, such as the gradient, running average of the gradient, etc. The controller is trained with Reinforcement Learning to maximize the performance of a model after a few epochs. On CIFAR-10, our method discovers several update rules that are better than many commonly used optimizers, such as Adam, RMSProp, or SGD with and without Momentum on a ConvNet model. We introduce two new optimizers, named PowerSign and AddSign, which we show transfer well and improve training on a variety of different tasks and architectures, including ImageNet classification and Google's neural machine translation system.
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    Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs) produce systematically better quality samples when class label information is provided., i.e. in the conditional GAN setup. This is still observed for the recently proposed Wasserstein GAN formulation which stabilized adversarial training and allows considering high capacity network architectures such as ResNet. In this work we show how to boost conditional GAN by augmenting available class labels. The new classes come from clustering in the representation space learned by the same GAN model. The proposed strategy is also feasible when no class information is available, i.e. in the unsupervised setup. Our generated samples reach state-of-the-art Inception scores for CIFAR-10 and STL-10 datasets in both supervised and unsupervised setup.
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    In recent years, the number of papers on Alzheimer's disease classification has increased dramatically, generating interesting methodological ideas on the use machine learning and feature extraction methods. However, practical impact is much more limited and, eventually, one could not tell which of these approaches are the most efficient. While over 90\% of these works make use of ADNI an objective comparison between approaches is impossible due to variations in the subjects included, image pre-processing, performance metrics and cross-validation procedures. In this paper, we propose a framework for reproducible classification experiments using multimodal MRI and PET data from ADNI. The core components are: 1) code to automatically convert the full ADNI database into BIDS format; 2) a modular architecture based on Nipype in order to easily plug-in different classification and feature extraction tools; 3) feature extraction pipelines for MRI and PET data; 4) baseline classification approaches for unimodal and multimodal features. This provides a flexible framework for benchmarking different feature extraction and classification tools in a reproducible manner. We demonstrate its use on all (1519) baseline T1 MR images and all (1102) baseline FDG PET images from ADNI 1, GO and 2 with SPM-based feature extraction pipelines and three different classification techniques (linear SVM, anatomically regularized SVM and multiple kernel learning SVM). The highest accuracies achieved were: 91% for AD vs CN, 83% for MCIc vs CN, 75% for MCIc vs MCInc, 94% for AD-A$\beta$+ vs CN-A$\beta$- and 72% for MCIc-A$\beta$+ vs MCInc-A$\beta$+. The code is publicly available at https://gitlab.icm-institute.org/aramislab/AD-ML (depends on the Clinica software platform, publicly available at http://www.clinica.run).
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    Swarm systems constitute a challenging problem for reinforcement learning (RL) as the algorithm needs to learn decentralized control policies that can cope with limited local sensing and communication abilities of the agents. Although there have been recent advances of deep RL algorithms applied to multi-agent systems, learning communication protocols while simultaneously learning the behavior of the agents is still beyond the reach of deep RL algorithms. However, while it is often difficult to directly define the behavior of the agents, simple communication protocols can be defined more easily using prior knowledge about the given task. In this paper, we propose a number of simple communication protocols that can be exploited by deep reinforcement learning to find decentralized control policies in a multi-robot swarm environment. The protocols are based on histograms that encode the local neighborhood relations of the agents and can also transmit task-specific information, such as the shortest distance and direction to a desired target. In our framework, we use an adaptation of Trust Region Policy Optimization to learn complex collaborative tasks, such as formation building, building a communication link, and pushing an intruder. We evaluate our findings in a simulated 2D-physics environment, and compare the implications of different communication protocols.
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    This paper studies how to efficiently learn an optimal latent variable model online from large streaming data. Latent variable models can explain the observed data in terms of unobserved concepts. They are traditionally studied in the unsupervised learning setting, and learned by iterative methods such as the EM. Very few online learning algorithms for latent variable models have been developed, and the most popular one is online EM. Though online EM is computationally efficient, it typically converges to a local optimum. In this work, we motivate and develop SpectralFPL, a novel algorithm to learn latent variable models online from streaming data. SpectralFPL is computationally efficient, and we prove that it quickly learns the global optimum under a bag-of-words model by deriving an $O(\sqrt n)$ regret bound. Experiment results also demonstrate a consistent performance improvement of SpectralFPL over online EM: in both synthetic and real-world experiments, SpectralFPL's performance is similar with or even better than online EM with optimally tuned parameters.
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    In this paper, we propose a novel recurrent neural network architecture for speech separation. This architecture is constructed by unfolding the iterations of a sequential iterative soft-thresholding algorithm (ISTA) that solves the optimization problem for sparse nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) of spectrograms. We name this network architecture deep recurrent NMF (DR-NMF). The proposed DR-NMF network has three distinct advantages. First, DR-NMF provides better interpretability than other deep architectures, since the weights correspond to NMF model parameters, even after training. This interpretability also provides principled initializations that enable faster training and convergence to better solutions compared to conventional random initialization. Second, like many deep networks, DR-NMF is an order of magnitude faster at test time than NMF, since computation of the network output only requires evaluating a few layers at each time step. Third, when a limited amount of training data is available, DR-NMF exhibits stronger generalization and separation performance compared to sparse NMF and state-of-the-art long-short term memory (LSTM) networks. When a large amount of training data is available, DR-NMF achieves lower yet competitive separation performance compared to LSTM networks.
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    A latent-variable model is introduced for text matching, inferring sentence representations by jointly optimizing generative and discriminative objectives. To alleviate typical optimization challenges in latent-variable models for text, we employ deconvolutional networks as the sequence decoder (generator), providing learned latent codes with more semantic information and better generalization. Our model, trained in an unsupervised manner, yields stronger empirical predictive performance than a decoder based on Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM), with less parameters and considerably faster training. Further, we apply it to text sequence-matching problems. The proposed model significantly outperforms several strong sentence-encoding baselines, especially in the semi-supervised setting.
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    Topological Data Analysis (TDA) is a recent and growing branch of statistics devoted to the study of the shape of the data. In this work we investigate the predictive power of TDA in the context of supervised learning. Since topological summaries, most noticeably the Persistence Diagram, are typically defined in complex spaces, we adopt a kernel approach to translate them into more familiar vector spaces. We define a topological exponential kernel, we characterize it, and we show that, despite not being positive semi-definite, it can be successfully used in regression and classification tasks.
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    Although deep Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) has shown better performance in various machine learning tasks, its application is accompanied by a significant increase in storage and computation. Among CNN simplification techniques, parameter pruning is a promising approach which aims at reducing the number of weights of various layers without intensively reducing the original accuracy. In this paper, we propose a novel progressive parameter pruning method, named Structured Probabilistic Pruning (SPP), which efficiently prunes weights of convolutional layers in a probabilistic manner. Unlike existing deterministic pruning approaches, in which the pruned weights of a well-trained model are permanently eliminated, SPP utilizes the relative importance of weights during training iterations, which makes the pruning procedure more accurate by leveraging the accumulated weight importance. Specifically, we introduce an effective weight competition mechanism to emphasize the important weights and gradually undermine the unimportant ones. Experiments indicate that our proposed method has obtained superior performance on ConvNet and AlexNet compared with existing pruning methods. Our pruned AlexNet achieves 4.0 $\sim$ 8.9x (averagely 5.8x) layer-wise speedup in convolutional layers with only 1.3\% top-5 error increase on the ImageNet-2012 validation dataset. We also prove the effectiveness of our method on transfer learning scenarios using AlexNet.
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    We study the problem of instance segmentation in biological images with crowded and compact cells. We formulate this task as an integer program where variables correspond to cells and constraints enforce that cells do not overlap. To solve this integer program, we propose a column generation formulation where the pricing program is solved via exact optimization of very small scale integer programs. Column generation is tightened using odd set inequalities which fit elegantly into pricing problem optimization. Our column generation approach achieves fast stable anytime inference for our instance segmentation problems. We demonstrate on three distinct light microscopy datasets, with several hundred cells each, that our proposed algorithm rapidly achieves or exceeds state of the art accuracy.
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    Stochastic principal component analysis (SPCA) has become a popular dimensionality reduction strategy for large, high-dimensional datasets. We derive a simplified algorithm, called Lazy SPCA, which has reduced computational complexity and is better suited for large-scale distributed computation. We prove that SPCA and Lazy SPCA find the same approximations to the principal subspace, and that the pairwise distances between samples in the lower-dimensional space is invariant to whether SPCA is executed lazily or not. Empirical studies find downstream predictive performance to be identical for both methods, and superior to random projections, across a range of predictive models (linear regression, logistic lasso, and random forests). In our largest experiment with 4.6 million samples, Lazy SPCA reduced 43.7 hours of computation to 9.9 hours. Overall, Lazy SPCA relies exclusively on matrix multiplications, besides an operation on a small square matrix whose size depends only on the target dimensionality.
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    Feature engineering is a crucial step in the process of predictive modeling. It involves the transformation of given feature space, typically using mathematical functions, with the objective of reducing the modeling error for a given target. However, there is no well-defined basis for performing effective feature engineering. It involves domain knowledge, intuition, and most of all, a lengthy process of trial and error. The human attention involved in overseeing this process significantly influences the cost of model generation. We present a new framework to automate feature engineering. It is based on performance driven exploration of a transformation graph, which systematically and compactly enumerates the space of given options. A highly efficient exploration strategy is derived through reinforcement learning on past examples.
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    By exploiting the property that the RBM log-likelihood function is the difference of convex functions, we formulate a stochastic variant of the difference of convex functions (DC) programming to minimize the negative log-likelihood. Interestingly, the traditional contrastive divergence algorithm is a special case of the above formulation and the hyperparameters of the two algorithms can be chosen such that the amount of computation per mini-batch is identical. We show that for a given computational budget the proposed algorithm almost always reaches a higher log-likelihood more rapidly, compared to the standard contrastive divergence algorithm. Further, we modify this algorithm to use the centered gradients and show that it is more efficient and effective compared to the standard centered gradient algorithm on benchmark datasets.
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    In recent years there has been noticeable interest in the study of the "shape of data". Among the many ways a "shape" could be defined, topology is the most general one, as it describes an object in terms of its connectivity structure: connected components (topological features of dimension 0), cycles (features of dimension 1) and so on. There is a growing number of techniques, generally denoted as Topological Data Analysis, aimed at estimating topological invariants of a fixed object; when we allow this object to change, however, little has been done to investigate the evolution in its topology. In this work we define the Persistence Flamelets, a multiscale version of one of the most popular tool in TDA, the Persistence Landscape. We examine its theoretical properties and we show how it could be used to gain insights on KDEs bandwidth parameter.
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    Finding optimal feedback controllers for nonlinear dynamic systems from data is hard. Recently, Bayesian optimization (BO) has been proposed as a powerful framework for direct controller tuning from experimental trials. For selecting the next query point and finding the global optimum, BO relies on a probabilistic description of the latent objective function, typically a Gaussian process (GP). As is shown herein, GPs with a common kernel choice can, however, lead to poor learning outcomes on standard quadratic control problems. For a first-order system, we construct two kernels that specifically leverage the structure of the well-known Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR), yet retain the flexibility of Bayesian nonparametric learning. Simulations of uncertain linear and nonlinear systems demonstrate that the LQR kernels yield superior learning performance.
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    We develop a new modeling framework for Inter-Subject Analysis (ISA). The goal of ISA is to explore the dependency structure between different subjects with the intra-subject dependency as nuisance. It has important applications in neuroscience to explore the functional connectivity between brain regions under natural stimuli. Our framework is based on the Gaussian graphical models, under which ISA can be converted to the problem of estimation and inference of the inter-subject precision matrix. The main statistical challenge is that we do not impose sparsity constraint on the whole precision matrix and we only assume the inter-subject part is sparse. For estimation, we propose to estimate an alternative parameter to get around the non-sparse issue and it can achieve asymptotic consistency even if the intra-subject dependency is dense. For inference, we propose an "untangle and chord" procedure to de-bias our estimator. It is valid without the sparsity assumption on the inverse Hessian of the log-likelihood function. This inferential method is general and can be applied to many other statistical problems, thus it is of independent theoretical interest. Numerical experiments on both simulated and brain imaging data validate our methods and theory.

Recent comments

Noon van der Silk Mar 08 2017 04:45 UTC

I feel that while the proliferation of GUNs is unquestionable a good idea, there are many unsupervised networks out there that might use this technology in dangerous ways. Do you think Indifferential-Privacy networks are the answer? Also I fear that the extremist binary networks should be banned ent

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