Statistics (stat)

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    We study causal inference in a multi-environment setting, in which the functional relations for producing the variables from their direct causes remain the same across environments, while the distribution of exogenous noises may vary. We introduce the idea of using the invariance of the functional relations of the variables to their causes across a set of environments. We define a notion of completeness for a causal inference algorithm in this setting and prove the existence of such algorithm by proposing the baseline algorithm. Additionally, we present an alternate algorithm that has significantly improved computational and sample complexity compared to the baseline algorithm. The experiment results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the other existing algorithms.
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    As a competitive alternative to least squares regression, quantile regression is popular in analyzing heterogenous data. For quantile regression model specified for one single quantile level $\tau$, major difficulties of semiparametric efficient estimation are the unavailability of a parametric efficient score and the conditional density estimation. In this paper, with the help of the least favorable submodel technique, we first derive the semiparametric efficient scores for linear quantile regression models that are assumed for a single quantile level, multiple quantile levels and all the quantile levels in $(0,1)$ respectively. Our main discovery is a one-step (nearly) semiparametric efficient estimation for the regression coefficients of the quantile regression models assumed for multiple quantile levels, which has several advantages: it could be regarded as an optimal way to pool information across multiple/other quantiles for efficiency gain; it is computationally feasible and easy to implement, as the initial estimator is easily available; due to the nature of quantile regression models under investigation, the conditional density estimation is straightforward by plugging in an initial estimator. The resulting estimator is proved to achieve the corresponding semiparametric efficiency lower bound under regularity conditions. Numerical studies including simulations and an example of birth weight of children confirms that the proposed estimator leads to higher efficiency compared with the Koenker-Bassett quantile regression estimator for all quantiles of interest.
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    Many data producers seek to provide users access to confidential data without unduly compromising data subjects' privacy and confidentiality. When intense redaction is needed to do so, one general strategy is to require users to do analyses without seeing the confidential data, for example, by releasing fully synthetic data or by allowing users to query remote systems for disclosure-protected outputs of statistical models. With fully synthetic data or redacted outputs, the analyst never really knows how much to trust the resulting findings. In particular, if the user did the same analysis on the confidential data, would regression coefficients of interest be statistically significant or not? We present algorithms for assessing this question that satisfy differential privacy. We describe conditions under which the algorithms should give accurate answers about statistical significance. We illustrate the properties of the methods using artificial and genuine data.
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    Generative adversarial networks (GANs) can implicitly learn rich distributions over images, audio, and data which are hard to model with an explicit likelihood. We present a practical Bayesian formulation for unsupervised and semi-supervised learning with GANs, in conjunction with stochastic gradient Hamiltonian Monte Carlo to marginalize the weights of the generator and discriminator networks. The resulting approach is straightforward and obtains good performance without any standard interventions such as feature matching, or mini-batch discrimination. By exploring an expressive posterior over the parameters of the generator, the Bayesian GAN avoids mode-collapse, produces interpretable candidate samples with notable variability, and in particular provides state-of-the-art quantitative results for semi-supervised learning on benchmarks including SVHN, CelebA, and CIFAR-10, outperforming DCGAN, Wasserstein GANs, and DCGAN ensembles.
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    Deep networks have recently been shown to be vulnerable to universal perturbations: there exist very small image-agnostic perturbations that cause most natural images to be misclassified by such classifiers. In this paper, we propose the first quantitative analysis of the robustness of classifiers to universal perturbations, and draw a formal link between the robustness to universal perturbations, and the geometry of the decision boundary. Specifically, we establish theoretical bounds on the robustness of classifiers under two decision boundary models (flat and curved models). We show in particular that the robustness of deep networks to universal perturbations is driven by a key property of their curvature: there exists shared directions along which the decision boundary of deep networks is systematically positively curved. Under such conditions, we prove the existence of small universal perturbations. Our analysis further provides a novel geometric method for computing universal perturbations, in addition to explaining their properties.
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    The goal of this paper is to analyze the geometric properties of deep neural network classifiers in the input space. We specifically study the topology of classification regions created by deep networks, as well as their associated decision boundary. Through a systematic empirical investigation, we show that state-of-the-art deep nets learn connected classification regions, and that the decision boundary in the vicinity of datapoints is flat along most directions. We further draw an essential connection between two seemingly unrelated properties of deep networks: their sensitivity to additive perturbations in the inputs, and the curvature of their decision boundary. The directions where the decision boundary is curved in fact remarkably characterize the directions to which the classifier is the most vulnerable. We finally leverage a fundamental asymmetry in the curvature of the decision boundary of deep nets, and propose a method to discriminate between original images, and images perturbed with small adversarial examples. We show the effectiveness of this purely geometric approach for detecting small adversarial perturbations in images, and for recovering the labels of perturbed images.
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    The Bonferroni adjustment, or the union bound, is commonly used to study rate optimality properties of statistical methods in high-dimensional problems. However, in practice, the Bonferroni adjustment is overly conservative. The extreme value theory has been proven to provide more accurate multiplicity adjustments in a number of settings, but only on ad hoc basis. Recently, Gaussian approximation has been used to justify bootstrap adjustments in large scale simultaneous inference in some general settings when $n \gg (\log p)^7$, where $p$ is the multiplicity of the inference problem and $n$ is the sample size. The thrust of this theory is the validity of the Gaussian approximation for maxima of sums of independent random vectors in high-dimension. In this paper, we reduce the sample size requirement to $n \gg (\log p)^5$ for the consistency of the empirical bootstrap and the multiplier/wild bootstrap in the Kolmogorov-Smirnov distance, possibly in the regime where the Gaussian approximation is not available. New comparison and anti-concentration theorems, which are of considerable interest in and of themselves, are developed as existing ones interweaved with Gaussian approximation are no longer applicable.
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    Applying standard statistical methods after model selection may yield inefficient estimators and hypothesis tests that fail to achieve nominal type-I error rates. The main issue is the fact that the post-selection distribution of the data differs from the original distribution. In particular, the observed data is constrained to lie in a subset of the original sample space that is determined by the selected model. This often makes the post-selection likelihood of the observed data intractable and maximum likelihood inference difficult. In this work, we get around the intractable likelihood by generating noisy unbiased estimates of the post-selection score function and using them in a stochastic ascent algorithm that yields correct post-selection maximum likelihood estimates. We apply the proposed technique to the problem of estimating linear models selected by the lasso. In an asymptotic analysis the resulting estimates are shown to be consistent for the selected parameters and to have a limiting truncated normal distribution. Confidence intervals constructed based on the asymptotic distribution obtain close to nominal coverage rates in all simulation settings considered, and the point estimates are shown to be superior to the lasso estimates when the true model is sparse.
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    K-Nearest Neighbours (k-NN) is a popular classification and regression algorithm, yet one of its main limitations is the difficulty in choosing the number of neighbours. We present a Bayesian algorithm to compute the posterior probability distribution for k given a target point within a data-set, efficiently and without the use of Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods or simulation - alongside an exact solution for distributions within the exponential family. The central idea is that data points around our target are generated by the same probability distribution, extending outwards over the appropriate, though unknown, number of neighbours. Once the data is projected onto a distance metric of choice, we can transform the choice of k into a change-point detection problem, for which there is an efficient solution: we recursively compute the probability of the last change-point as we move towards our target, and thus de facto compute the posterior probability distribution over k. Applying this approach to both a classification and a regression UCI data-sets, we compare favourably and, most importantly, by removing the need for simulation, we are able to compute the posterior probability of k exactly and rapidly. As an example, the computational time for the Ripley data-set is a few milliseconds compared to a few hours when using a MCMC approach.
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    We consider the utilization of a computational model to guide the optimal acquisition of experimental data to inform the stochastic description of model input parameters. Our formulation is based on the recently developed consistent Bayesian approach for solving stochastic inverse problems which seeks a posterior probability density that is consistent with the model and the data in the sense that the push-forward of the posterior (through the computational model) matches the observed density on the observations almost everywhere. Given a set a potential observations, our optimal experimental design (OED) seeks the observation, or set of observations, that maximizes the expected information gain from the prior probability density on the model parameters. We discuss the characterization of the space of observed densities and a computationally efficient approach for rescaling observed densities to satisfy the fundamental assumptions of the consistent Bayesian approach. Numerical results are presented to compare our approach with existing OED methodologies using the classical/statistical Bayesian approach and to demonstrate our OED on a set of representative PDE-based models.
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    Deep generative models based on Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs) have demonstrated impressive sample quality but in order to work they require a careful choice of architecture, parameter initialization, and selection of hyper-parameters. This fragility is in part due to a dimensional mismatch between the model distribution and the true distribution, causing their density ratio and the associated f-divergence to be undefined. We overcome this fundamental limitation and propose a new regularization approach with low computational cost that yields a stable GAN training procedure. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach on several datasets including common benchmark image generation tasks. Our approach turns GAN models into reliable building blocks for deep learning.
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    We present a new model, called Predictive State Recurrent Neural Networks (PSRNNs), for filtering and prediction in dynamical systems. PSRNNs draw on insights from both Recurrent Neural Networks (RNNs) and Predictive State Representations (PSRs), and inherit advantages from both types of models. Like many successful RNN architectures, PSRNNs use (potentially deeply composed) bilinear transfer functions to combine information from multiple sources, so that one source can act as a gate for another. These bilinear functions arise naturally from the connection to state updates in Bayes filters like PSRs, in which observations can be viewed as gating belief states. We show that PSRNNs can be learned effectively by combining backpropogation through time (BPTT) with an initialization based on a statistically consistent learning algorithm for PSRs called two-stage regression (2SR). We also show that PSRNNs can be can be factorized using tensor decomposition, reducing model size and suggesting interesting theoretical connections to existing multiplicative architectures such as LSTMs. We applied PSRNNs to 4 datasets, and showed that we outperform several popular alternative approaches to modeling dynamical systems in all cases.
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    Background-Foreground classification is a fundamental well-studied problem in computer vision. Due to the pixel-wise nature of modeling and processing in the algorithm, it is usually difficult to satisfy real-time constraints. There is a trade-off between the speed (because of model complexity) and accuracy. Inspired by the rejection cascade of Viola-Jones classifier, we decompose the Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) into an adaptive cascade of classifiers. This way we achieve a good improvement in speed without compensating for accuracy. In the training phase, we learn multiple KDEs for different durations to be used as strong prior distribution and detect probable oscillating pixels which usually results in misclassifications. We propose a confidence measure for the classifier based on temporal consistency and the prior distribution. The confidence measure thus derived is used to adapt the learning rate and the thresholds of the model, to improve accuracy. The confidence measure is also employed to perform temporal and spatial sampling in a principled way. We demonstrate a speed-up factor of 5x to 10x and 17 percent average improvement in accuracy over several standard videos.
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    We define a second-order neural network stochastic gradient training algorithm whose block-diagonal structure effectively amounts to normalizing the unit activations. Investigating why this algorithm lacks in robustness then reveals two interesting insights. The first insight suggests a new way to scale the stepsizes, clarifying popular algorithms such as RMSProp as well as old neural network tricks such as fanin stepsize scaling. The second insight stresses the practical importance of dealing with fast changes of the curvature of the cost.
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    It can be difficult to tell whether a trained generative model has learned to generate novel examples or has simply memorized a specific set of outputs. In published work, it is common to attempt to address this visually, for example by displaying a generated example and its nearest neighbor(s) in the training set (in, for example, the L2 metric). As any generative model induces a probability density on its output domain, we propose studying this density directly. We first study the geometry of the latent representation and generator, relate this to the output density, and then develop techniques to compute and inspect the output density. As an application, we demonstrate that "memorization" tends to a density made of delta functions concentrated on the memorized examples. We note that without first understanding the geometry, the measurement would be essentially impossible to make.
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    Topic models for text corpora comprise a popular family of methods that have inspired many extensions to encode properties such as sparsity, interactions with covariates, and the gradual evolution of topics. In this paper, we combine certain motivating ideas behind variations on topic models with modern techniques for variational inference to produce a flexible framework for topic modeling that allows for rapid exploration of different models. We first discuss how our framework relates to existing models, and then demonstrate that it achieves strong performance, with the introduction of sparsity controlling the trade off between perplexity and topic coherence.
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    A Discriminative Deep Forest (DisDF) as a metric learning algorithm is proposed in the paper. It is based on the Deep Forest or gcForest proposed by Zhou and Feng and can be viewed as a gcForest modification. The case of the fully supervised learning is studied when the class labels of individual training examples are known. The main idea underlying the algorithm is to assign weights to decision trees in random forest in order to reduce distances between objects from the same class and to increase them between objects from different classes. The weights are training parameters. A specific objective function which combines Euclidean and Manhattan distances and simplifies the optimization problem for training the DisDF is proposed. The numerical experiments illustrate the proposed distance metric algorithm.
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    Motivated by problems in search and detection we present a solution to a Combinatorial Multi-Armed Bandit (CMAB) problem with both heavy-tailed reward distributions and a new class of feedback, filtered semibandit feedback. In a CMAB problem an agent pulls a combination of arms from a set $\{1,...,k\}$ in each round, generating random outcomes from probability distributions associated with these arms and receiving an overall reward. Under semibandit feedback it is assumed that the random outcomes generated are all observed. Filtered semibandit feedback allows the outcomes that are observed to be sampled from a second distribution conditioned on the initial random outcomes. This feedback mechanism is valuable as it allows CMAB methods to be applied to sequential search and detection problems where combinatorial actions are made, but the true rewards (number of objects of interest appearing in the round) are not observed, rather a filtered reward (the number of objects the searcher successfully finds, which must by definition be less than the number that appear). We present an upper confidence bound type algorithm, Robust-F-CUCB, and associated regret bound of order $\mathcal{O}(\ln(n))$ to balance exploration and exploitation in the face of both filtering of reward and heavy tailed reward distributions.
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    In genetic epidemiological studies, family history data are collected on relatives of study participants and used to estimate the age-specific risk of disease for individuals who carry a causal mutation. However, a family member's genotype data may not be collected due to the high cost of in-person interview to obtain blood sample or death of a relative. Previously, efficient nonparametric genotype-specific risk estimation in censored mixture data has been proposed without considering covariates. With multiple predictive risk factors available, risk estimation requires a multivariate model to account for additional covariates that may affect disease risk simultaneously. Therefore, it is important to consider the role of covariates in the genotype-specific distribution estimation using family history data. We propose an estimation method that permits more precise risk prediction by controlling for individual characteristics and incorporating interaction effects with missing genotypes in relatives, and thus gene-gene interactions and gene-environment interactions can be handled within the framework of a single model. We examine performance of the proposed methods by simulations and apply them to estimate the age-specific cumulative risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) in carriers of LRRK2 G2019S mutation using first-degree relatives who are at genetic risk for PD. The utility of estimated carrier risk is demonstrated through designing a future clinical trial under various assumptions. Such sample size estimation is seen in the Huntington's disease literature using the length of abnormal expansion of a CAG repeat in the HTT gene, but is less common in the PD literature.
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    Autonomous systems can substantially enhance a human's efficiency and effectiveness in complex environments. Machines, however, are often unable to observe the preferences of the humans that they serve. Despite the fact that the human's and machine's objectives are aligned, asymmetric information, along with heterogeneous sensitivities to risk by the human and machine, make their joint optimization process a game with strategic interactions. We propose a framework based on risk-sensitive dynamic games; the human seeks to optimize her risk-sensitive criterion according to her true preferences, while the machine seeks to adaptively learn the human's preferences and at the same time provide a good service to the human. We develop a class of performance measures for the proposed framework based on the concept of regret. We then evaluate their dependence on the risk-sensitivity and the degree of uncertainty. We present applications of our framework to self-driving taxis, and robo-financial advising.
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    The FIFA ranking of national (male) soccer teams suffers from various drawbacks that cause heated debates, all-the-more as this ranking governs the seating in the international tournaments and the associated qualification rounds. In the present paper, we propose five alternative models based on strength parameters that are determined by maximum likelihood estimation. We conduct a comparison of these five statistical models, to which we add the ELO model used for the women's FIFA ranking, on grounds of their predictive performance. Indeed, contrary to regular league rankings, the FIFA ranking is designed to measure the current strength of teams, hence should allow accurate predictions of future matches. Our comparison is based on fifteen English Premier League seasons. The best performing model is then used to build the alternative FIFA ranking. We furthermore show its predictive power by analyzing the 2016 European Championship (EURO2016) and comparing our predictions to the bookmaker ratings, usually considered as golden standard.
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    Background-Prognostic predictive models are used in the delivery of primary care to estimate a patients risk of future disease development. Electronic medical record, EMR, data can be used for the construction of these models. Objectives- To provide a framework for those seeking to develop prognostic predictive models using EMR data, and to illustrate these steps using osteoarthritis risk estimation as an example. FRAMR-EMR-The FRAmework for Modelling Risk from EMR data, FRAMR-EMR, was created, which outlines step-by-step guidance for the construction of a prognostic predictive model using EMR data. Throughout these steps, several potential pitfalls specific to using EMR data for predictive purposes are described and methods for addressing them are suggested. Case Study-We used the DELPHI, DELiver Primary Healthcare Information, database to develop our prognostic predictive model for estimation of osteoarthritis risk. We constructed a retrospective cohort of 28447 eligible primary care patients. Patients were included if they had an encounter with their primary care practitioner between 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2009. Patients were excluded if they had a diagnosis of osteoarthritis prior to baseline. Construction of a prognostic predictive model following FRAMR-EMR yielded a predictive model capable of estimating 5-year risk of osteoarthritis diagnosis. Logistic regression was used to predict osteoarthritis based on age, sex, BMI, previous leg injury, and osteoporosis. Internal validation of the models performance demonstrated good discrimination and moderate calibration. Conclusions-This study provides guidance to those interested in developing prognostic predictive models based on EMR data. The production of high quality prognostic predictive models allows for practitioner communication of accurately estimated risks of developing future disease among primary care patients.
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    Given a low frequency sample of an infinitely divisible moving average random field $\{\int_{\mathbb{R}^d} f(x-t)\Lambda(dx); \ t \in \mathbb{R}^d \}$ with a known simple function $f$, we study the problem of nonparametric estimation of the Lévy characteristics of the independently scattered random measure $\Lambda$. We provide three methods, a simple plug-in approach, a method based on Fourier transforms and an approach involving decompositions with respect to $L^2$-orthonormal bases, which allow to estimate the Lévy density of $\Lambda$. For these methods, the bounds for the $L^2$-error are given. Their numerical performance is compared in a simulation study.
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    Since the 2005 American Statistical Association's (ASA) endorsement of the Guidelines for Assessment and Instruction in Statistics Education (GAISE) College Report, changes in the statistics field and statistics education have had a major impact on the teaching and learning of statistics. We now live in a world where "Statistics - the science of learning from data - is the fastest-growing science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) undergraduate degree in the United States," according to the ASA, and where many jobs demand an understanding of how to explore and make sense of data. In light of these new reports and other changes and demands on the discipline, a group of volunteers revised the 2005 GAISE College Report. The updated report was endorsed by the Board of Directors of the American Statistical Association in July 2016. To help shed additional light on the revision process and subsequent changes in the report, we review the report and share insights into the committee's thoughts and assumptions.
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    We address asymptotic approximation $y(u)$ to the quantile function $h(u)$ as $u\to 0^+$ or $1^-,$ in particular for important distributions when $h(\cdot)$ has no simple closed form. The performance of such an approximation may be judged by how well it cancels the cumulative distribution function $g(\cdot)$; or by how close it is to $h(u)$. We establish a result linking the two performance criteria by using regularly varying functions. For applications, several initial terms of an asymptotic expansion of $h(u)$ plus the order of the lower order remainder term, as $ u \to 0^+$ or $1^-$ can be obtained. This is tantamount to assessing the order of difference: $h(u) - y(u),$ which our approach enables us to do. The Normal, Skew-Normal and Gamma are used as examples. Finally, we discuss approximation to the lower quantile of the Variance-Gamma and Skew-Slash distributions.
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    We consider inference about the history of a sample of DNA sequences, conditional upon the haplotype counts and the number of segregating sites observed at the present time. After deriving some theoretical results in the coalescent setting, we implement rejection sampling and importance sampling schemes to perform the inference. The importance sampling scheme addresses an extension of the Ewens Sampling Formula for a configuration of haplotypes and the number of segregating sites in the sample. The implementations include both constant and variable population size models. The methods are illustrated by two human Y chromosome data sets.
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    Graphical network inference is used in many fields such as genomics or ecology to infer the conditional independence structure between variables, from measurements of gene expression or species abundances for instance. In many practical cases, it is likely that not all variables involved in the network have been actually observed. The observed samples are therefore drawn from a distribution where some unobserved variables have been marginalized out. In this context, the inference of underlying networks is compromised because marginalization in graphical models yields locally dense structures, which challenges the assumption that biological networks are sparse. In this article we present a procedure for inferring Gaussian graphical models in the presence of unobserved variables. We provide a model based on spanning trees and the EM algorithm which accounts both for the influence of unobserved variables and the low density of the network. We treat the graph structure and the unobserved nodes as latent variables and compute posterior probabilities of edge appearance. We also propose several model selection criteria to estimate the number of missing nodes, and compare our method to existing graph inference techniques on simulations and on a flow cytometry data illustration.
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    Discrete statistical models supported on labelled event trees can be specified using so-called interpolating polynomials which are generalizations of generating functions. These admit a nested representation. A new algorithm exploits the primary decomposition of monomial ideals associated with an interpolating polynomial to quickly compute all nested representations of that polynomial. It hereby determines an important subclass of all trees representing the same statistical model. To illustrate this method we analyze the full polynomial equivalence class of a staged tree representing the best fitting model inferred from a real-world dataset.
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    In recent years, RTB(Real Time Bidding) becomes a popular online advertisement trading method. During the auction, each DSP is supposed to evaluate this opportunity and respond with an ad and corresponding bid price. Generally speaking, this is a kind of assginment problem for DSP. However, unlike traditional one, this assginment problem has bid price as additional variable. It's essential to find an optimal ad selection and bid price determination strategy. In this document, two major steps are taken to tackle it. First, the augmented GAP(Generalized Assignment Problem) is proposed and a general bidding strategy is correspondingly provided. Second, we show that DSP problem is a special case of the augmented GAP and the general bidding strategy applies. To the best of our knowledge, our solution is the first DSP bidding framework that is derived from strict second price auction assumption and is generally applicable to the multiple ads scenario with various objectives and constraints. Our strategy is verified through simulation and outperforms state-of-the-art strategies in real application.
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    Performing statistical inference on collections of graphs is of import to many disciplines. Graph embedding, in which the vertices of a graph are mapped to vectors in a low-dimensional Euclidean space, has gained traction as a basic tool for graph analysis. In this paper, we describe an omnibus embedding in which multiple graphs on the same vertex set are jointly embedded into a single space with a distinct representation for each graph. We prove a central limit theorem for this omnibus embedding, and we show that this simultaneous embedding into a common space allows comparison of graphs without the need to perform pairwise alignments of graph embeddings. Experimental results demonstrate that the omnibus embedding improves upon existing methods, allowing better power in multiple-graph hypothesis testing and yielding better estimation in a latent position model.
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    To assess the presence of gerrymandering, one can consider the shapes of districts or the distribution of votes. The "efficiency gap," which does the latter, plays a central role in a 2016 federal court case on the constitutionality of Wisconsin's state legislative district plan. Unfortunately, however, the efficiency gap reduces to proportional representation, an expectation that is not a constitutional right. We present a new measure of partisan asymmetry that does not rely on the shapes of districts, is simple to compute, is provably related to the "packing and cracking" integral to gerrymandering, and that avoids the constitutionality issue presented by the efficiency gap. In addition, we introduce a generalization of the efficiency gap that also avoids the equivalency to proportional representation. We apply the first function to US congressional and state legislative plans from recent decades to identify candidate gerrymanders.

Recent comments

Noon van der Silk Mar 08 2017 04:45 UTC

I feel that while the proliferation of GUNs is unquestionable a good idea, there are many unsupervised networks out there that might use this technology in dangerous ways. Do you think Indifferential-Privacy networks are the answer? Also I fear that the extremist binary networks should be banned ent

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Noon van der Silk Jan 27 2016 03:39 UTC

Great institute name ...

Alessandro Dec 09 2015 01:12 UTC

Hey, I've already seen this title! http://arxiv.org/abs/1307.0401

Chris Granade Sep 22 2015 19:15 UTC

Thank you for the kind comments, I'm glad that our paper, source code, and tutorial are useful!

Travis Scholten Sep 21 2015 17:05 UTC

This was a really well-written paper! Am very glad to see this kind of work being done.

In addition, the openness about source code is refreshing. By explicitly relating the work to [QInfer](https://github.com/csferrie/python-qinfer), this paper makes it more easy to check the authors' work. Furthe

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Chris Granade Sep 15 2015 02:40 UTC

As a quick addendum, please note that the [supplementary video](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=22ejRV0Kx2g) for this work is available [on YouTube](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=22ejRV0Kx2g). Thank you!

Richard Kueng Mar 08 2015 22:02 UTC

Neither, Frédéric! Replacing fidelity by superfidelity still requires optimizing over all density matrices. However, the Birkhoff-von Neumann Theorem (see Lemma 1) allows for further restricting this optimization to n scalar variables w.l.o.g.---Theorem 2. Arguably, this greatly simplifies the geome

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Frédéric Grosshans Mar 05 2015 11:31 UTC

I fell for that clickbait title and read the paper. I still don’t get why von Neumann didn't want us to know about this weird trick? And which weird trick? The use of superfidelity or the use of non-physical density matrices like $\sigma^\sharp$?

Noon van der Silk Mar 03 2015 03:20 UTC

I took the liberty of uploading the IPython notebook as a github [gist](https://gist.github.com), so it's viewable [here](http://nbviewer.ipython.org/urls/gist.githubusercontent.com/silky/b14fa42c6d5475a3a724/raw/887c19fb04581f1a33f9d03370e4b7b3a33c2ea8/ferrie_kueng_bayes_est_fid.ipynb).