Quantum Physics (quant-ph)

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    With the current rate of progress in quantum computing technologies, 50-qubit systems will soon become a reality. To assess, refine and advance the design and control of these devices, one needs a means to test and evaluate their fidelity. This in turn requires the capability of computing ideal quantum state amplitudes for devices of such sizes and larger. In this study, we present a new approach for this task that significantly extends the boundaries of what can be classically computed. We demonstrate our method by presenting results obtained from a calculation of the complete set of output amplitudes of a universal random circuit with depth 27 in a 2D lattice of $7 \times 7$ qubits. We further present results obtained by calculating an arbitrarily selected slice of $2^{37}$ amplitudes of a universal random circuit with depth 23 in a 2D lattice of $8 \times 7$ qubits. Such calculations were previously thought to be impossible due to impracticable memory requirements. Using the methods presented in this paper, the above simulations required 4.5 and 3.0 TB of memory, respectively, to store calculations, which is well within the limits of existing classical computers.
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    It is well known that correlations predicted by quantum mechanics cannot be explained by any classical (local-realistic) theory. The relative strength of quantum and classical correlations is usually studied in the context of Bell inequalities, but this tells us little about the geometry of the quantum set of correlations. In other words, we do not have good intuition about what the quantum set actually looks like. In this paper we study the geometry of the quantum set using standard tools from convex geometry. We find explicit examples of rather counter-intuitive features in the simplest non-trivial Bell scenario (two parties, two inputs and two outputs) and illustrate them using 2-dimensional slice plots. We also show that even more complex features appear in Bell scenarios with more inputs or more parties. Finally, we discuss the limitations that the geometry of the quantum set imposes on the task of self-testing.
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    The Born rule assigns a probability to any possible outcome of a quantum measurement, but leaves open the question how these probabilities are to be interpreted and, in particular, how they relate to the outcome observed in an actual experiment. We propose to avoid this question by replacing the Born rule with two non-probabilistic postulates: (i) the projector associated to the observed outcome must have a positive overlap with the state of the measured system; (ii) statements about observed outcomes are robust, that is, remain valid under small perturbations of the state. We show that the two postulates suffice to retrieve the interpretations of the Born rule that are commonly used for analysing experimental data.
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    Quantum processors promise a paradigm shift in high-performance computing which needs to be assessed by accurate benchmarking measures. In this work, we introduce a new benchmark for variational quantum algorithm (VQA), recently proposed as a heuristic algorithm for small-scale quantum processors. In VQA, a classical optimization algorithm guides the quantum dynamics of the processor to yield the best solution for a given problem. A complete assessment of scalability and competitiveness of VQA should take into account both the quality and the time of dynamics optimization. The method of optimal stopping, employed here, provides such an assessment by explicitly including time as a cost factor. Here we showcase this measure for benchmarking VQA as a solver for some quadratic unconstrained binary optimization. Moreover we show that a better choice for the cost function of the classical routine can significantly improve the performance of the VQA algorithm and even improving it's scaling properties.
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    Satellite-based QKD offers the potential to share highly secure encryption keys between optical ground stations all over the planet. SpooQySats is a programme for establishing the space worthiness of highly-miniaturised, polarization entangled, photon pair sources using CubeSat nanosatellites. The sources are being developed iteratively with an early version in orbit already and improved versions soon to be launched. Once fully developed, the photon pair sources can be deployed on more advanced satellites that are equipped with optical links. These can allow for very secure uplinks and downlinks and can be used to establish a global space-based quantum key distribution network. This would enable highly secure symmetric encryption keys to be shared between optical ground stations all over the planet.
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    One of the most important problems in linear optics quantum computing is to find the origin of its computational complexity. We claim in this work that the majorization of photon distributions is a crucial factor that affects the complexity of linear optics. Our analysis concentrates on the boson sampling problem, an exemplary model of linear optics. Prior to the main discussion, a majorization-dependent quantity that can measure the quantum complexity of identical particle distributions is introduced, which we call the Boltzmann entropy of elementary quantum complexity $S_B^q$. It decreases as the majorization of the photon distribution vector increases. Using the properties of majorization and $S_B^q$, we analyze two quantities that are the criteria for the computational complexity, $\mathcal{T}$ (the runtime of a generalized classical algorithm for calculating the permanent) and $\mathcal{E}$ (the additive error bound for an approximated permanent estimator). The runtime $\mathcal{T}$ becomes shorter as the input and output distribution vectors are more majorized, and the error bound $\mathcal{E}$ decreases as the majorization difference of input and output states increases. In addition, $S_B^q$ turns out to be an underlying quantity of $\mathcal{T}$ and $\mathcal{E}$, which implies that $S_B^q$ is an essential resource of the computational complexity of linear optics. We expect our findings would provide a fresh perspective to answer the fundamental questions of quantum supremacy.
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    Speech on the occasion of accepting the Dagmar and Vaclav Havel Foundation VIZE 97 Prize for 2017. Delivered at Prague Crossroads, October 5, 2017
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    A semi-quantum key distribution (SQKD) protocol allows a quantum user and a limited "classical" user to establish a shared secret key secure against an all-powerful adversary. In this work, we present a new SQKD protocol where the quantum user is also limited in her measurement capabilities. We describe the protocol, prove its security, and show its noise tolerance is as high as "fully quantum" QKD protocols.
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    Information about an unknown quantum state can be encoded in weak values of projectors belonging to a complete eigenbasis. We present a protocol that enables one party -- Bob -- to remotely determine the weak values corresponding to weak measurements performed by another spatially separated party -- Alice. The particular set of weak values contains complete information of the quantum state encoded on Alice's ancilla, which enacts the role of the preselected system state in the aforementioned weak measurement. Consequently, Bob can determine the quantum state from these weak values, which can also be termed as remote state determination or remote state tomography. A combination of non-product bipartite resource state shared between the two parties and classical communication between them is necessary to bring this statistical scheme to fruition. Significantly, the information transfer of a pure quantum state of any known dimensions can be effected even with a resource state of low dimensionality and purity with a single measurement setting at Bob's end.
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    Non-classical quantum technologies that rely on manipulation of quantum states and exploitation of quantum superposition and entanglement are approaching a level of maturity sufficient to contemplate commercialization as the basis of practical devices for sensing, communications, navigation and other applications in the relatively near-term. However, realization of such technologies is dependent upon the development of appropriate Quantum Systems Engineering (QSE) approaches. It is clear that whilst traditional systems engineering will support much of the integration need, there are aspects associated with system of interest definition, system modelling, and system verification where substantial advances in the systems engineering approach are required. This paper lays out in detail the challenges associated with Quantum Enabled Systems and Technologies (QEST) and analyses the adequacy of systems engineering processes and tools, as defined by the Systems and Software Engineering lifecycle standard (ISO/IEC/IEEE 15288), to meet these challenges. The conclusions of this paper provide an outline agenda for systems research in order to engineer QEST.
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    The holy grail of quantum key distribution (QKD) theory is a robust, quantitative method to explore novel protocol ideas and to investigate the effects of device imperfections on the key rate. We argue that numerical methods are superior to analytical ones for this purpose. However, new challenges arise with numerical approaches, including the efficiency (i.e., possibly long computation times) and reliability of the calculation. In this work, we present a reliable, efficient, and tight numerical method for calculating key rates for finite-dimensional QKD protocols. We illustrate our approach by finding higher key rates than those previously reported in the literature for several interesting scenarios (e.g., the Trojan-horse attack and the phase-coherent BB84 protocol). Our method will ultimately improve our ability to automate key rate calculations and, hence, to develop a user-friendly software package that could be used widely by QKD researchers.
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    We study the behaviour of two different measures of the complexity of multipartite correlation patterns, weaving and neural complexity, for symmetric quantum states. Weaving is the weighted sum of genuine multipartite correlations of any order, where the weights are proportional to the correlation order. The neural complexity, originally introduced to characterize correlation patterns in classical neural networks, is here extended to the quantum scenario. We derive close formulas of the two quantities for GHZ states mixed with white noise
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    It is well known that Grover's algorithm asymptotically transforms an equal superposition state into an eigenstate (of a given basis). Here, we demonstrate a verification algorithm based on weak measurement which can achieve the same purpose even if the qubit is \textitnot in an equal superposition state. The proposed algorithm highlights the \textitdistinguishability between any arbitrary single qubit superposition state and an eigenstate. We apply this algorithm to propose the scheme of a Quantum Locker, a protocol in which any legitimate party can verify his/her authenticity by using a newly developed Quantum One-Time Password (OTP) and retrieve the necessary message from the locker. We formally explicate the working of Quantum Locker in association with the Quantum OTP, which theoretically offers a much higher security against any adversary, as compared to any classical security device.
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    The rules of canonical quantization normally offer good results, but sometimes they fail, e.g., leading to quantum triviality ($=$ free) for certain examples that are classically nontrivial ($\ne$ free). A new procedure, called Enhanced Quantization, relates classical models with their quantum partners differently and leads to satisfactory results for all systems. This paper features enhanced quantization procedures and provides highlights of two examples, a rotationally symmetric model and an ultralocal scalar model, for which canonical quantization fails while enhanced quantization succeeds.
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    The question concerning the physical realizability of a probability distribution is of quite importance in Quantum foundations. Specker first pointed out that this question cannot be answered from Kolmogorov's axioms alone. Lately, this observation of Specker has motivated simple principles (exclusivity principle/ local orthogonality principle) that can explain quantum limit regarding the possible sets of experimental probabilities in various nonlocality and contextuality experiments. We study Specker's observation in the simplest scenario involving three inputs each with two outputs. Then using only linear constraints imposed on joint probabilities by this principle, we reveal unphysical nature of Garg-Mermin (GM) correlation. Interestingly, GM correlation was proposed to falsify the following suggestion by Fine: if the inequalities of Clauser and Horne holds, then there exists a deterministic local hidden-variable model for a spin-1/2 correlation experiment of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen type, even when more than two observables are involved on each side. Our result, contrary to a recent claim by different group of researchers, establishes that local orthogonality principle at single copy level is not equivalent to the no-signaling condition.
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    We study matter-wave interferometry in the presence of a stochastic background of gravitational waves. It is shown that if the background has a scale-invariant spectrum over a wide bandwidth (which is expected in a class of inflationary models of Big Bang cosmology), then separated-path interference cannot be observed for a lump of matter of size above a limit which is very insensitive to the strength and bandwidth of the fluctuations, unless the interferometer is servo-controlled or otherwise protected. For ordinary solid matter this limit is of order 1--10 mm. A servo-controlled or cross-correlated device would also exhibit limits to the observation of macroscopic interference, which we estimate for ordinary matter moving at speeds small compared to c.
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    We propose a scheme to tailor nanostructured potentials for ultracold atoms. Our scheme is based on optical dipole forces and Casimir-Polder forces between an atom and a nanostructured surface. In the scheme we use a doubly-dressed-state method to engineer internal states of atoms. For this we use two lasers and we take advantage of surface plasmon resonance for intensity enhancement. We show that this protocol could be used to trap Rubidium atoms close to the surface (tens of nanometers) and to realize nanostructured lattices with a period of 100 nm. The resulting lattices allow the enhancement of energy scales, which is benefit to simulate strongly-correlated physics. The technique could be extended to other atomic species.
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    In this thesis, we considered quantum systems coupled to several baths. We supposed that the system state is governed by the quantum master equation (QME). We investigated the quantum pump and the excess entropy production. In the first half of the thesis, we investigated the quantum pump using the full counting statistics with quantum master equation (FCS-QME) approach. In the latter part of the thesis, we investigated the excess entropy production. The average entropy production is composed of the time integral of the instantaneous steady entropy production rate and the excess entropy production. We define average entropy production rate using the average energy and particle currents, which are calculated by using the full counting statistics with QME. The excess entropy production is given by a line integral in the control parameter space and its integrand is called the Berry-Sinitsyn-Nemenman (BSN) vector. In the weakly nonequilibrium regime, we show that BSN vector is described by $\ln \rho_0^{(-1)}$ and $\rho_0$ where $\rho_0$ is the instantaneous steady state of the QME and $\rho_0^{(-1)}$ is that of the QME which is given by reversing the sign of the Lamb shift term. In general, the potential dose not exist. The origins of the non-existence of the potential are a quantum effect (the Lamb shift) and the breaking of the time-reversal symmetry. The non-existence of the potential means that the excess entropy essentially depends on the path of the modulation. If the system Hamiltonian is non-degenerate or the Lamb shift term is negligible, the excess entropy production approximately reduces to the difference between the von Neumann entropies of the system. We pointed out that the expression of the entropy production obtained in the classical Markov jump process is different from our result and showed that these are approximately equivalent only in the weakly nonequilibrium regime.
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    The non-linear coupled particle light dynamics of an ultracold gas in the field of two independent counter-propagating laser beams can lead to the dynamical formation of a self-ordered lattice structure as presented in Phys. Rev. X 6, 021026 (2016). Here we present new numerical studies on experimentally observable signatures to monitor the growth and properties of such a crystal in real time. While, at least theoretically, optimal non-destructive observation of the growth dynamics and the hallmarks of the crystalline phase can be performed by analyzing the scattered light, monitoring the evolution of the particle's momentum distribution via time-of-flight probing is an experimentally more accessible choice. In this work we show that both approaches allow to unambiguously distinguish the crystal from independent collective scattering as it occurs in matter wave super-radiance. As a clear crystallization signature we identify spatial locking between the two emerging standing laser waves together creating the crystal potential. For sufficiently large systems the system allows reversible adiabatic ramping into the crystalline phase as an alternative to a quench across the phase transition and growth from fluctuations.
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    We present the experimental demonstration of interaction induced enhancement in Rydberg excitation or Rydberg anti-blockade in thermal atomic vapor. We have used optical heterodyne detection technique to measure Rydberg population due to two-photon excitation to the Rydberg state. The anti-blockade peak which doesn't satisfy the two-photon resonant condition is observed along with the usual two-photon resonant peak which can't be explained using the model with non-interacting three-level atomic system. A model involving two interacting atoms is formulated for thermal atomic vapor using the dressed states of three-level atomic system to explain the experimental observations. A non-linear dependence of vapor density is observed for the anti-blockade peak which also increases with increase in principal quantum number of the Rydberg state. A good agreement is found between the experimental observations and the proposed interacting model. Our result implies possible applications towards quantum logic gates using Rydberg anti-blockade in thermal atomic vapor.
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    We characterize Leggett-Garg-Type Inequality (LGtI) for three flavor neutrino oscillations in the presence of matter and CP violating effects, showing how they can be expressed in terms of the neutrino survival as well as oscillation probabilities. Hence, our results are in terms of experimentally measurable quantities. We then explicitly show the violation of LGtI in the context of two ongoing accelerator facilities, NOvA and T2K. Remarkably, such combinations of two-time correlators are sensitive to the well-known mass hierarchy problem in Delta_31 and also to the CP violation in the leptonic sector.
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    For light harvestors with a reaction center complex (LH1-RC complex) of three types, we propose an experiment to verify our analysis based upon antenna theories that automatically include the required structural information. Our analysis conforms to current understanding of light-harvesting antennae in that we can explain known properties of the complex. a functional role of the notch at the light harvestor, the functional role of the special pair, a reason for the use of dielectric chlorophylls instead of a conductor to make the light harvestor, a mechanism to prevent damage from excess sunlight, an advantage of the dimeric form, a reason that the cross section of the light harvestor must not be circular, a reason for the modular design of nature, a function of the non-heme iron at the reaction center, and a reason that the light harvestor must not be spherical. Based upon our analysis we provide a mechanism for dimerization and propose an experiment. We predict the dimeric form of light-harvesting complexes is favoured under intense sunlight. We further comment upon the classification of the dimeric or S-shape complexes.
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    We consider crystal chirp effects on SPDC when pumping at 800 nm. The typical distribution produced in frequency-momentum space is a pop tab-like structure which turns out to be suitable for the implementation of versatile light sources. Our analyzes consider the effect of internal and external parameters in the process; in the former we include the crystal chirp and length, while in the latter temperature, as well as pump chirp and beam properties. We report evidence of the appropriateness of SPDC from chirped crystals to manipulate the frequency and transverse momentum properties of the light produced. We briefly comment on potential usefulness of the types of light produced, in particular for quantum information applications.
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    Experiments handling Rydberg atoms near surfaces must necessarily deal with the high sensitivity of Rydberg atoms to (stray) electric fields that typically emanate from adsorbates on the surface. We demonstrate a method to modify and reduce the stray electric field by changing the adsorbates distribution. We use one of the Rydberg excitation lasers to locally affect the adsorbed dipole distribution. By adjusting the averaged exposure time we change the strength (with the minimal value less than $0.2\,\textrm{V/cm}$ at $78\,\mu\textrm{m}$ from the chip) and even the sign of the perpendicular field component. This technique is a useful tool for experiments handling Ryberg atoms near surfaces, including atom chips.
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    By studying the quench dynamics in one-dimensional superlattice systems with inversion symmetry, we find robust crossings in single-particle entanglement spectra for quantum quenches between different symmetry-protected topological phases. The physics behind this phenomenon is the emergence of a dynamical Chern number accompanied by unitarily created momentum-time Skyrmions. We also discuss a possible experimental situation based on Bloch-state tomography in ultracold atomic systems. Our work identifies the unique role of topology in quantum dynamics far from equilibrium.
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    We consider multi-time correlators for output signals from linear detectors, continuously measuring several qubit observables at the same time. Using the quantum Bayesian formalism, we show that for unital (symmetric) evolution in the absence of phase backaction, an $N$-time correlator can be expressed as a product of two-time correlators when $N$ is even. For odd $N$, there is a similar factorization, which also includes a single-time average. Theoretical predictions agree well with experimental results for two detectors, which simultaneously measure non-commuting qubit observables.
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    The technique of shortcuts to adiabaticity (STA) has attracted broad attention due to their possible applications in quantum information processing and quantum control. However, most studies published so far have been only focused on Hermitian systems under the rotating-wave approximation (RWA). In this paper, we propose a modified STA technique to realize population transfer for a non-Hermitian system without RWA. We work out an exact expression for the control function and present examples consisting of two- and three-level systems with decay to show the theory. The results suggest that the STA technique presented here is robust for fast passages. We also find that the decay has small effect on the population transfer in the three-level system. To shed more light on the physics behind this result, we reduce the quantum three-level system to an effective two-level one with large detunings. The STA technique of effective two-level system is studied. Thereby the high-fidelity population transfer can be implemented in non-Hermitian systems by our method, and it works even without RWA.
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    We propose a scheme for preparation of large-scale entangled $GHZ$ states and $W$ states with neutral Rydberg atoms. The scheme mainly depends on Rydberg antiblockade effect, i.e., as the Rydberg-Rydberg-interaction (RRI) strength and the detuning between the atom transition frequency and the classical laser frequency satisfies some certain conditions, the effective Rabi oscillation between the two ground states and the two excitation Rydberg states would be generated. The prominent advantage is that both two-multiparticle $GHZ$ states and two-multiparticle $W$ states can be fused in this model, especially the success probability for fusion of $GHZ$ states can reach unit. In addition, the imperfections induced by the spontaneous emission is also discussed through numerical simulation.
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    The static second hyperpolarizability is derived from the space-fractional Schrödinger equation in the particle-centric view. The Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule matrix elements and the three-level ansatz determines the maximum second hyperpolarizability for a space-fractional quantum system. The total oscillator strength is shown to decrease as the space-fractional parameter $\alpha$ decreases, which reduces the optical response of a quantum system in the presence of an external field. This damped response is caused by the wavefunction dependent position and momentum commutation relation. Although the maximum response is damped, we show that the one-dimensional quantum harmonic oscillator is no longer a linear system for $\alpha \neq 1$, where the second hyperpolarizability becomes negative before ultimately damping to zero at the lower fractional limit of $\alpha \rightarrow 1/2$.
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    In this paper, we analyze the potential for new types of searches using the formalism of scattering random walks on Quantum Computers. Given a particular type of graph consisting of nodes and connections, a "Tree Maze", we would like to find a selected final node as quickly as possible, faster than any classical search algorithm. We show that this can be done using a quantum random walk, both exactly through numerical calculations as well as analytically using eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the quantum system.
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    Since unconditionally secure quantum two-party computations are known to be impossible, most existing quantum private comparison (QPC) protocols adopted a third party. Recently, we proposed a QPC protocol which involves two parties only, and showed that although it is not unconditionally secure, it only leaks an extremely small amount of information to the other party. Here we further propose the device-independent version of the protocol, so that it can be more convenient and dependable in practical applications.

Recent comments

Siddhartha Das Oct 06 2017 03:18 UTC

Here is a work in related direction: "Unification of Bell, Leggett-Garg and Kochen-Specker inequalities: Hybrid spatio-temporal inequalities", Europhysics Letters 104, 60006 (2013), which may be relevant to the discussions in your paper. [https://arxiv.org/abs/1308.0270]

Bassam Helou Sep 22 2017 17:21 UTC

The initial version of the article does not adequately and clearly explain how certain equations demonstrate whether a particular interpretation of QM violates the no-signaling condition.
A revised and improved version is scheduled to appear on September 25.

James Wootton Sep 21 2017 05:41 UTC

What does this imply for https://scirate.com/arxiv/1608.00263? I'm guessing they still regard it as valid (it is ref [14]), but just too hard to implement for now.

Ben Criger Sep 08 2017 08:09 UTC

Oh look, there's another technique for decoding surface codes subject to X/Z correlated errors: https://scirate.com/arxiv/1709.02154

Aram Harrow Sep 06 2017 07:54 UTC

The paper only applies to conformal field theories, and such a result cannot hold for more general 1-D systems by 0705.4077 and other papers (assuming standard complexity theory conjectures).

Felix Leditzky Sep 05 2017 21:27 UTC

Thanks for the clarification, Philippe!

Philippe Faist Sep 05 2017 21:09 UTC

Hi Felix, thanks for the good question.

We've found it more convenient to consider trace-nonincreasing and $\Gamma$-sub-preserving maps (and this is justified by the fact that they can be dilated to fully trace-preserving and $\Gamma$-preserving maps on a larger system). The issue arises because

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Felix Leditzky Sep 05 2017 19:02 UTC

What is the reason/motivation to consider trace-non-increasing maps instead of trace-preserving maps in your framework and the definition of the coherent relative entropy?

Steve Flammia Aug 30 2017 22:30 UTC

Thanks for the reference Ashley. If I understand your paper, you are still measuring stabilizers of X- and Z-type at the top layer of the code. So it might be that we can improve on the factor of 2 that you found if we tailor the stabilizers to the noise bias at the base level.

Ashley Aug 30 2017 22:09 UTC

We followed Aliferis and Preskill's approach in [https://arxiv.org/abs/1308.4776][1] and found that the fault-tolerant threshold for the surface code was increased by approximately a factor of two, from around 0.75 per cent to 1.5 per cent for a bias of 10 to 100.

[1]: https://arxiv.org/abs/1308.

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