Quantum Physics (quant-ph)

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    Quantum-limited amplifiers increase the amplitude of the signal at the price of introducing additional noise. Quantum purification protocols operate in the reverse way, by reducing the noise while attenuating the signal. Here we investigate a scenario that interpolates between these two extremes. We search for the physical process that produces the best approximation of a pure and amplified coherent state, starting from multiple copies of a noisy coherent state with Gaussian modulation. We identify the optimal quantum processes, considering both the case of deterministic and probabilistic processes. And we give benchmarks that can be used to certify the experimental demonstration of genuine quantum-enhanced amplification.
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    Kitaev's quantum double models, including the toric code, are canonical examples of quantum topological models on a 2D spin lattice. Their Hamiltonian define the groundspace by imposing an energy penalty to any nontrivial flux or charge, but treats any such violation in the same way. Thus, their energy spectrum is very simple. We introduce a new family of quantum double Hamiltonians with adjustable coupling constants that allow us to tune the energy of anyons while conserving the same groundspace as Kitaev's original construction. Those Hamiltonians are made of commuting four-body projectors that provide an intricate splitting of the Hilbert space.
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    We present a categorical construction for modelling both definite and indefinite causal structures within a general class of process theories that include classical probability theory and quantum theory. Unlike prior constructions within categorical quantum mechanics, the objects of this theory encode finegrained causal relationships between subsystems and give a new method for expressing and deriving consequences for a broad class of causal structures. To illustrate this point, we show that this framework admits processes with definite causal structures, namely one-way signalling processes, non-signalling processes, and quantum n-combs, as well as processes with indefinite causal structure, such as the quantum switch and the process matrices of Oreshkov, Costa, and Brukner. We furthermore give derivations of their operational behaviour using simple, diagrammatic axioms.
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    In quantum networking, repeater hijacking menaces the security and utility of quantum applications. To deal with this problem, it is important to take a measure of the impact of quantum repeater hijacking. First, we quantify the workload of each quantum repeater with regards to each quantum communication. Based on this, we show the costs for repeater hijacking detection using distributed quantum state tomography and the amount of work loss and rerouting penalties caused by hijacking. This quantitive evaluation covers both purification-entanglement swapping and quantum error correction repeater networks. In addition, we discuss the proper frequency of tomography and provide the upper and lower bound.
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    We formulate three current models of discrete-time quantum walks in a combinatorial way. These walks are shown to be closely related to rotation systems and 1-factorizations of graphs. For two of the models, we compute the traces and total entropies of the average mixing matrices for some cubic graphs. The trace captures how likely a quantum walk is to revisit the state it started with, and the total entropy measures how close the limiting distribution is to uniform. Our numerical results indicate three relations between quantum walks and graph structures: for the first model, rotation systems with higher genera give lower traces and higher entropies, and for the second model, the symmetric 1-factorizations always give the highest trace.
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    The black hole information paradox presumes that quantum field theory in curved spacetime can provide unitary propagation from a near-horizon mode to an asymptotic Hawking quantum. Instead of invoking conjectural quantum gravity effects to modify such an assumption, we propose a self-consistency check. We establish an analogy to Feynman's analysis of a double-slit experiment. Feynman showed that unitary propagation of the interfering particles, namely ignoring the entanglement with the double-slit, becomes an arbitrarily reliable assumption when the screen upon which the interference pattern is projected is infinitely far away. We argue for an analogous self-consistency check for quantum field theory in curved spacetime. We apply it to the propagation of Hawking quanta and test whether ignoring the entanglement with the geometry also becomes arbitrarily reliable in the limit of a large black hole. We present curious results to suggest a negative answer, and we discuss how this loss of na?ive unitarity in QFT might be related to a solution of the paradox based on the soft-hair-memory effect.
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    A method for measuring the real part of the weak (local) value of spin is presented using a variant on the original Stern-Gerlach apparatus. The experiment utilises metastable helium in the $\rm 2^{3}S_{1}$ state. A full simulation using the impulsive approximation has been carried out and it predicts a displacement of the beam by $\rm \Delta_{w} = 17 - 33\,\mu m$. This is on the limit of our detector resolution and we will discuss ways of increasing $\rm \Delta_{w}$. The simulation also indicates how we might observe the imaginary part of the weak value.
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    An analytical, single-parametric, complete and orthonormal basis set consisting of the hydrogen wave-functions is put forward for \textitab initio calculations of observable characteristics of an arbitrary many-electron atom. By introducing a single parameter for the whole basis set of a given atom, namely an effective charge $Z^{*}$, we find a sufficiently good analytical approximation for the atomic characteristics of all elements of the periodic table. The basis completeness allows us to perform a transition into the secondary-quantized representation for the construction of a regular perturbation theory, which includes in a natural way correlation effects and allows one to easily calculate the subsequent corrections. The hydrogen-like basis set provides a possibility to perform all summations over intermediate states in closed form, with the help of the decomposition of the multi-particle Green function in a convolution of single-electronic Coulomb Green functions. We demonstrate that our analytical zeroth-order approximation provides better accuracy than the Thomas-Fermi model and already in second-order perturbation theory our results become comparable with those via multi-configuration Hartree-Fock.
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    We show that it is possible to construct spectrally lower bound limited functions which can oscillate locally at an arbitrarily low frequency. Such sub-oscillatory functions are complementary to super-oscillatory functions which are band-limited yet can oscillate locally at an arbitrarily high frequency. We construct a spatially sub-oscillatory optical beam to experimentally demonstrate optical super defocusing.
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    We propose a scheme of enhancement of Rabi coupling between two identical atomic ensembles trapped inside an optical cavity in a membrane-in-the-middle set up. The cavity modes dispersively interact with the ensembles and the effective interaction between the ensembles is governed by the tunnelling rate of the cavity modes through the oscillating membrane. We have shown that this interaction can be made large enough such that the Rabi oscillation occurs in a time-scale, much smaller than the relevant decay time-scales of the cavity modes and of the membrane. We present the detailed analytical and numerical results and assess the feasibility of the scheme using currently available technology.
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    We study the scattering of photons by a two-level system ultrastrongly coupled to a one-dimensional waveguide. Using a combination of the polaron transformation with scattering theory we can compute the one-photon scattering properties of the qubit for a broad range of coupling strengths, estimating resonance frequencies, lineshapes and linewidths. We validate numerically and analytically the accuracy of this technique up to $\alpha=0.3$, close to the Toulouse point $\alpha=1/2$, where inelastic scattering becomes relevant. These methods model recent experiments with superconducting circuits [P. Forn-Dı́az et al., Nat. Phys. (2016)].
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    A new convenient method to diagonalize the non-relativistic many-body Schroedinger equation with two-body central potentials is derived. It combines kinematic rotations (democracy transformations) and exact calculation of overlap integrals between bases with different sets of mass-scaled Jacobi coordinates, thereby allowing for a great simplification of this formidable problem. We validate our method by obtaining a perfect correspondence with the exactly solvable three-body ($N=3$) Calogero model in 1D.
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    Testing quantum theory on macroscopic scales is a longstanding challenge that might help to revolutionise physics. For example, laboratory tests (such as those anticipated in nanomechanical or biological systems) may look to rule out macroscopic realism: the idea that the properties of macroscopic objects exist objectively and can be non-invasively measured. Such investigations are likely to suffer from i) stringent experimental requirements, ii) marginal statistical significance and iii) logical loopholes. We address all of these problems by refining two tests of macroscopic realism, or `quantum witnesses', and implementing them in a microscopic test on a photonic qubit and qutrit. The first witness heralds the invasiveness of a blind measurement; its maximum violation has been shown to grow with the dimensionality of the system under study. The second witness heralds the invasiveness of a generic quantum operation, and can achieve its maximum violation in any dimension -- it therefore allows for the highest quantum signal-to-noise ratio and most significant refutation of the classical point of view.
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    The spontaneous moralization of the quantum stochastic walk is the effect of propagation on the moral graph instead of the original graph. We argue that this effect is undesired, especially in the case of directed graphs. We also propose a procedure to correct this effect. We analyse the corrected model using the Hurst exponent. We show that the fast propagation of the walk, results from the model itself and not from the existence of the additional amplitude transitions. We demonstrate that the obtained result can be used for arbitrary directed graphs.
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    Quantum aided Byzantine agreement (QBA) is an important distributed quantum algorithm with unique features in comparison to classical deterministic and randomized algorithms, requiring only a constant expected number of rounds in addition to giving higher level of security. In this paper, we analyze details of the high level multi-party algorithm, and propose elements of the design for the quantum architecture and circuits required at each node to run the algorithm on a quantum repeater network. Our optimization techniques have reduced the quantum circuit depth by 44\% and the number of qubits in each node by 20\% for a minimum five-node setup compared to the design based on the standard arithmetic circuits. These improvements lead to an architecture with $KQ \approx 1.3 \times 10^{5}$ per node and error threshold $1.1 \times 10^{-6}$ for the total nodes in the network. The evaluation of the designed architecture shows that to execute the algorithm once on the minimum setup, we need to successfully distribute a total of 648 Bell pairs across the network, spread evenly between all pairs of nodes. This framework can be considered a starting point for establishing a road-map for light-weight demonstration of a distributed quantum application on quantum repeater networks.
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    Optimizing a connection through a quantum repeater network requires careful attention to the photon propagation direction of the individual links, the arrangement of those links into a path, the error management mechanism chosen, and the application's pattern of consuming the Bell pairs generated. We analyze combinations of these parameters, concentrating on one-way error correction schemes (1-EPP) and high success probability links (those averaging enough entanglement successes per round trip time interval to satisfy the error correction system). We divide the buffering time (defined as minimizing the time during which qubits are stored without being usable) into the link-level and path-level waits. With three basic link timing patterns, a path timing pattern with zero unnecessary path buffering exists for all $3^h$ combinations of $h$ hops, for Bell inequality violation experiments (B class) and Clifford group (C class) computations, but not for full teleportation (T class) computations. On most paths, T class computations have a range of Pareto optimal timing patterns with a non-zero amount of path buffering. They can have optimal zero path buffering only on a chain of links where the photonic quantum states propagate counter to the direction of teleportation. Such a path reduces the time that a quantum state must be stored by a factor of two compared to Pareto optimal timing on some other possible paths.
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    A recent Google study [Phys. Rev. X, 6:031015 (2016)] compared a D-Wave 2X quantum processing unit (QPU) to two classical Monte Carlo algorithms: simulated annealing (SA) and quantum Monte Carlo (QMC). The study showed the D-Wave 2X to be up to 100 million times faster than the classical algorithms. The Google inputs are designed to demonstrate the value of collective multiqubit tunneling, a resource that is available to D-Wave QPUs but not to simulated annealing. But the computational hardness in these inputs is highly localized in gadgets, with only a small amount of complexity coming from global interactions, meaning that the relevance to real-world problems is limited. In this study we provide a new synthetic problem class that addresses the limitations of the Google inputs while retaining their strengths. We use simple clusters instead of more complex gadgets and more emphasis is placed on creating computational hardness through global interactions like those seen in interesting real-world inputs. We use these inputs to evaluate the new 2000-qubit D-Wave QPU. We include the HFS algorithm---the best performer in a broader analysis of Google inputs---and we include state-of-the-art GPU implementations of SA and QMC. The D-Wave QPU solidly outperforms the software solvers: when we consider pure annealing time (computation time), the D-Wave QPU reaches ground states up to 2600 times faster than the competition. In the task of zero-temperature Boltzmann sampling from challenging multimodal inputs, the D-Wave QPU holds a similar advantage and does not see significant performance degradation due to quantum sampling bias.
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    We explore signatures of the non-Markovianity in the time-resolved energy transfer processes for quantum open systems. Focusing on typical systems such as the exact solvable damped Jaynes-Cummings model and the general spin-boson model, we establish quantitative links between the time-resolved energy current and the symmetric logarithmic derivative quantum Fisher information (SLD-QFI) flow, one of measures quantifying the non-Markovianity, within the framework of non-Markovian master equations in time-local forms. From the relationships, we find in the damped Jaynes-Cummings model that the SLD-QFI backflow from the reservoir to the system always correlates with an energy backflow, thus we can directly witness the non-Markovianity from the dynamics of the energy current. In the spin-boson model, the relation is built on the rotating-wave approximation, calibrated against exact numerical results, and proven reliable in the weak coupling regime. We demonstrate that whether the non-Markovianity guarantees the occurrence of an energy backflow depends on the bath spectral function. For the Ohmic and sub-Ohmic cases, we show that no energy backflow occurs and the energy current always flow out of the system even in the non-Markovian regime. While in the super-Ohmic case, we observe that the non-Markovian dynamics can induce an energy backflow.
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    We report on the optical and mechanical characterization of arrays of parallel micromechanical membranes. Pairs of high-tensile stress, 100 nm-thick silicon nitride membranes are assembled parallel with each other with separations ranging from 8.5 to 200 $\mu$m. Their optical properties are accurately determined using a combination of broadband and monochromatic illuminations and the lowest vibrational mode frequencies and mechanical quality factors are determined interferometrically. The results and techniques demonstrated are promising for investigations of collective phenomena in optomechanical arrays.
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    Genuine steering is still not well understood enough in contrast to genuine entanglement and nonlocality. Here we provide a protocol which can reveal genuine steering under some restricted operations compared to the existing witnesses of genuine multipartite steering. Our method has an impression of some sort of hidden protocol in the same spirit of hidden nonlocality, which is well understood in bipartite scenario. We also introduce a genuine steering measure which indicates the enhancement of genuine steering in the final state of our protocol compared to the initial states.
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    The technique of laser levitation of nanoparticles has become increasingly promising in the study of cool- ing and controlling mesoscopic quantum systems. Unlike a mechanical system, the levitated nanoparticle is less exposed to thermalization and decoherence due to the absence of a direct contact with a thermal environment. In ultrahigh vacuum, the dominant source of decoherence comes from the unavoidable photon recoil from the optical trap, and it sets an ultimate bound for the control of levitated systems. In this paper, we study the shot noise heating and the parametric feedback cooling of an optically trapped anisotropic nanoparticle in the laser shot noise dominant regime. The rotational trapping frequency and shot noise heating rate have a dependence on the shape of the trapped particle. For an ellipsoidal particle, the ratio of the axis lengths and the overall size controls the shot noise heating rate relative to the rota- tional frequency. For a near spherical nanoparticle, the effective heating rate for the rotational degrees of freedom is smaller than that for translation suggesting that the librational ground state may be easier to achieve than the vibrational ground state.
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    Spontaneously generated coherence and enhanced dispersion in a V-type, three-level atomic system interacting with a single mode field can considerably reduce the radiative and cavity decay rates. This may eliminate the use of high finesse, miniaturized cavities in optical cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments under strong atom-field coupling conditions.
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    Coherent control of chaotic molecular systems, using laser-assisted alignment of sulphur dioxide (SO$_2$) molecules in the presence of a static electric field as an example, is considered. Conditions for which the classical version of this system is chaotic are established, and the quantum and classical analogs are shown to be in very good correspondence. It is found that the chaos present in the classical system does not impede the alignment, neither in the classical nor the quantum system. Using the results of numerical calculations, we suggest that laser-assisted alignment is stable against rotational chaos for all asymmetric top molecules.
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    We investigate theoretically the non-Markovian dynamics of a degenerate V-type quantum emitter in the vicinity of a metallic nanosphere, a system that exhibits quantum interference in spontaneous emission due to the anisotropic Purcell effect. We calculate numerically the electromagnetic Green's tensor and employ the effective modes differential equation method for calculating the quantum dynamics of the emitter population, with respect to the resonance frequency and the initial state of the emitter, as well as its distance from the nanosphere. We find that the emitter population evolution varies between a gradually total decay and a partial decay combined with oscillatory population dynamics, depending strongly on the specific values of the above three parameters. Under strong coupling conditions, coherent population trapping can be observed in this system. We compare our exact results with results when the flat continuum approximation for the modified by the metallic nanosphere vacuum is applied. We conclude that the flat continuum approximation is an excellent approximation only when the spectral density of the system under study is characterized by non-overlapping plasmonic resonances.
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    Quantum annealing is a promising technique which leverages quantum mechanics to solve hard optimization problems. Considerable progress has been made in the development of a physical quantum annealer, motivating the study of methods to enhance the efficiency of such a solver. In this work, we present a quantum annealing approach to measure similarity among molecular structures. Implementing real-world problems on a quantum annealer is challenging due to hardware limitations such as sparse connectivity, intrinsic control error, and limited precision. In order to overcome the limited connectivity, a problem must be reformulated using minor-embedding techniques. Using a real data set, we investigate the performance of a quantum annealer in solving the molecular similarity problem. We provide experimental evidence that common practices for embedding can be replaced by new alternatives which mitigate some of the hardware limitations and enhance its performance. Common practices for embedding include minimizing either the number of qubits or the chain length, and determining the strength of ferromagnetic couplers empirically. We show that current criteria for selecting an embedding do not improve the hardware's performance for the molecular similarity problem. Furthermore, we use a theoretical approach to determine the strength of ferromagnetic couplers. Such an approach removes the computational burden of the current empirical approaches, and also results in hardware solutions that can benefit from simple local classical improvement. Although our results are limited to the problems considered here, they can be generalized to guide future benchmarking studies.
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    Increasing the collection efficiency from solid-state emitters is an important step towards achieving robust single photon sources, as well as optically connecting different nodes of quantum hardware. A metallic substrate may be the most basic method of improving the collection of photons from quantum dots, with predicted collection efficiency increases of up to 50%. The established 'method-of-images' approach models the effects of a reflective surface for atomic and molecular emitters by replacing the metal surface with a second fictitious emitter which ensures appropriate electromagnetic boundary conditions. Here, we extend the approach to the case of driven solid-state emitters, where exciton-phonon interactions play a key role in determining the optical properties of the system. We derive an intuitive polaron master equation and demonstrate its agreement with the complementary half-sided cavity formulation of the same problem. Our extended image approach offers a straightforward route towards studying the dynamics of multiple solid-state emitters near a metallic surface.
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    The way Quantum Mechanics (QM) is introduced to people used to Classical Mechanics (CM) is by a complete change of the general methodology despite QM historically stemming from CM as a means to explain experimental results. Therefore, it is desirable to build a bridge from CM to QM. This paper presents a generalization of CM to QM. It starts from the generalization of a point-like object and naturally arrives at the quantum state vector of quantum systems in the complex valued Hilbert space, its time evolution and quantum representation of a measurement apparatus of any size. It is shown that a measurement apparatus is a special case of a general quantum object.
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    The $5p$ two-photon ionization cross section of xenon in the photon-energy range below the one-photon ionization threshold is calculated within the time-dependent configuration-interaction-singles (TDCIS) method. The TDCIS calculations are compared to random-phase-approximation (RPA) calculations [Wendin \textitet al., J. Opt. Soc. Am. B \textbf4, 833 (1987)] and are found to reproduce the energy positions of the intermediate Rydberg states reasonably well. The effect of interchannel coupling is also investigated and found to change the cross section of the $5p$ shell only slightly compared to the intrachannel case.

Recent comments

Noon van der Silk Jan 05 2017 04:51 UTC

This is a cool paper!

Māris Ozols Dec 16 2016 15:38 UTC

Indeed, Schur complement is the answer to the ultimate question!

Stefano Pirandola Nov 30 2016 06:45 UTC

Dear Mark, thx for your comment. There are indeed missing citations to previous works by Rafal, Janek and Lorenzo that we forgot to add. Regarding your paper, I did not read it in detail but I have two main comments:

1- What you are using is completely equivalent to the tool of "quantum simulatio

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Mark M. Wilde Nov 30 2016 02:18 UTC

An update http://arxiv.org/abs/1609.02160v2 of this paper has appeared, one day after the arXiv post http://arxiv.org/abs/1611.09165 . The paper http://arxiv.org/abs/1609.02160v2 now includes (without citation) some results for bosonic Gaussian channels found independently in http://arxiv.org/abs/16

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Felix Leditzky Nov 29 2016 16:34 UTC

Thank you very much for the reply!

Martin Schwarz Nov 24 2016 13:53 UTC

Oded Regev writes [here][1]:

"Dear all,

Yesterday Lior Eldar and I found a flaw in the algorithm proposed
in the arXiv preprint. I do not see how to salvage anything from
the algorithm. The security of lattice-based cryptography against
quantum attacks therefore remains intact and uncha

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Alex Wozniakowski Nov 22 2016 19:50 UTC

Here, the string diagrams (for qudits, transformations, and measurements) may have charge. The manipulation of diagrams with charge requires para-isotopy, which generalizes topological isotopy; and the relation for para-isotopy is found on pg. 11, in eq. (22). Essentially, para-isotopy keeps track

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Felix Leditzky Nov 22 2016 17:18 UTC

Could you give an example of a topological isotopy that transforms the transformation $T$ on p.3 into the one in eq. (6)? On a related note, how is a topological isotopy defined?

Stephen Jordan Nov 15 2016 15:58 UTC

This is a very nice review article.

Daniel Lidar Nov 15 2016 04:40 UTC

All comments are very welcome. We list 10 open questions at the end of the review, and would be happy to expand the list. Accepted contributions will be acknowledged.