Quantum Physics (quant-ph)

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    Product formulas can be used to simulate Hamiltonian dynamics on a quantum computer by approximating the exponential of a sum of operators by a product of exponentials of the individual summands. This approach is both straightforward and surprisingly efficient. We show that by simply randomizing how the summands are ordered, one can prove stronger bounds on the quality of approximation and thereby give more efficient simulations. Indeed, we show that these bounds can be asymptotically better than previous bounds that exploit commutation between the summands, despite using much less information about the structure of the Hamiltonian. Numerical evidence suggests that our randomized algorithm may be advantageous even for near-term quantum simulation.
  • May 23 2018 quant-ph cs.CC arXiv:1805.08577v1
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    We show that combining two different hypothetical enhancements to quantum computation---namely, quantum advice and non-collapsing measurements---would let a quantum computer solve any decision problem whatsoever in polynomial time, even though neither enhancement yields extravagant power by itself. This complements a related result due to Raz. The proof uses locally decodable codes.
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    We compare the performance of quantum error correcting codes when memory errors are unitary with the more familiar case of dephasing noise. For a wide range of codes we analytically compute the effective logical channel that results when the error correction steps are performed noiselessly. Our examples include the entire family of repetition codes, the 5-qubit, Steane, Shor, and surface codes. When errors are measured in terms of the diamond norm, we find that the error correction is typically much more effective for unitary errors than for dephasing. We observe this behavior for a wide range of codes after a single level of encoding, and in the thresholds of concatenated codes using hard decoders. We show that this holds with great generality by proving a bound on the performance of any stabilizer code when the noise at the physical level is unitary. By comparing the diamond norm error $D'_\diamond$ of the logical qubit with the same quantity at the physical level $D_\diamond$, we show that $D'_\diamond \le c D^d_\diamond $ where $d$ is the distance of the code and $c$ is constant that depends on the code but not on the error. This bound compares very favorably to the performance of error correction for dephasing noise and other Pauli channels, where an error correcting code of odd distance $d$ will exhibit a scaling $D'_\diamond \sim D_\diamond^{(d+1)/2}$.
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    Quantum mechanics fundamentally forbids deterministic discrimination of quantum states and processes. However, the ability to optimally distinguish various classes of quantum data is an important primitive in quantum information science. In this work, we train near-term quantum circuits to classify data represented by non-orthogonal quantum probability distributions using the Adam stochastic optimization algorithm. This is achieved by iterative interactions of a classical device with a quantum processor to discover the parameters of an unknown non-unitary quantum circuit. This circuit learns to simulates the unknown structure of a generalized quantum measurement, or Positive-Operator-Value-Measure (POVM), that is required to optimally distinguish possible distributions of quantum inputs. Notably we use universal circuit topologies, with a theoretically motivated circuit design, which guarantees that our circuits can in principle learn to perform arbitrary input-output mappings. Our numerical simulations show that shallow quantum circuits could be trained to discriminate among various pure and mixed quantum states exhibiting a trade-off between minimizing erroneous and inconclusive outcomes with comparable performance to theoretically optimal POVMs. We train the circuit on different classes of quantum data and evaluate the generalization error on unseen mixed quantum states. This generalization power hence distinguishes our work from standard circuit optimization and provides an example of quantum machine learning for a task that has inherently no classical analogue.
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    The quantum chromatic number, $\chi_q(G)$, of a graph $G$ was originally defined as the minimal number of colors necessary in a quantum protocol in which two provers that cannot communicate with each other but share an entangled state can convince an interrogator with certainty that they have a coloring of the graph. We use an equivalent purely combinatorial definition of $\chi_q(G)$ to prove that many spectral lower bounds for the chromatic number, $\chi(G)$, are also lower bounds for $\chi_q(G)$. This is achieved using techniques from linear algebra called pinching and twirling. We illustrate our results with some examples.
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    We describe a general procedure for associating a minimal informationally-complete quantum measurement (or MIC) and a set of linearly independent post-measurement quantum states with a purely probabilistic representation of the Born Rule. Such representations are motivated by QBism, where the Born Rule is understood as a consistency condition between probabilities assigned to the outcomes of one experiment in terms of the probabilities assigned to the outcomes of other experiments. In this setting, the difference between quantum and classical physics is the way their physical assumptions augment bare probability theory: Classical physics corresponds to a trivial augmentation---one just applies the Law of Total Probability (LTP) between the scenarios---while quantum theory makes use of the Born Rule expressed in one or another of the forms of our general procedure. To mark the essential difference between quantum and classical, one should seek the representations that minimize the disparity between the expressions. We prove that the representation of the Born Rule obtained from a symmetric informationally-complete measurement (or SIC) minimizes this distinction in at least two senses---the first to do with unitarily invariant distance measures between the rules, and the second to do with available volume in a reference probability simplex (roughly speaking a new kind of uncertainty principle). Both of these arise from a significant majorization result. This work complements recent studies in quantum computation where the deviation of the Born Rule from the LTP is measured in terms of negativity of Wigner functions.
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    Given a quantum many-body system with few-body interactions, how rapidly can quantum information be hidden during time evolution? The fast scrambling conjecture is that the time to thoroughly mix information among N degrees of freedom grows at least logarithmically in N. We derive this inequality for generic quantum systems at infinite temperature, by relating the scrambling time to a finite decay time of local quantum correlations at late times. Using Lieb-Robinson bounds, generalized Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev models, and random unitary circuits, we propose that a logarithmic scrambling time can be achieved in most quantum systems with sparse connectivity. These models also elucidate how quantum chaos is not universally related to scrambling: we construct random few-body circuits with infinite Lyapunov exponent but logarithmic scrambling time. We discuss analogies between quantum models on graphs and quantum black holes, and suggest methods to experimentally study scrambling with as many as 100 sparsely-connected quantum degrees of freedom.
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    The far field radiation pattern of three, dipole coupled, two level atoms is shown to yield sub and super radiant behavior, with the nature of light quanta controlled by the underlying quantum correlations. Superradiance is found to faithfully reflect the monogamy of quantum correlation and is robust against thermal effects. It persists at finite temperature with reduced intensity, even in the absence of entanglement but with non-zero quantum discord. The intensity of emitted radiation is highly focused and anisotropic in one phase and completely uniform in another, with the two phases separated by a cross over. Radiation intensity is shown to exhibit periodic variation from super to sub-radiant behavior, as a function of inter atomic spacing and observation angle, which persists up to a significantly high temperature. The precise effects of transition frequency and inter-dipole spacing on the angular spread and variations of the intensity in the uniform and non-uniform regimes are explicitly demonstrated at finite temperature. Photon-photon correlation is shown to exhibit sub and super Poissonian statistics in a parametrically controlled manner.
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    Quantum open systems evolve according to completely positive, trace preserving maps acting on the density operator, which can equivalently be unraveled in term of so-called quantum trajectories. These stochastic sequences of pure states correspond to the actual dynamics of the quantum system during single realizations of an experiment in which the system's environment is monitored. In this chapter, we present an extension of stochastic thermodynamics to the case of open quantum systems, which builds on the analogy between the quantum trajectories and the trajectories in phase space of classical stochastic thermodynamics. We analyze entropy production, work and heat exchanges at the trajectory level, identifying genuinely quantum contributions due to decoherence induced by the environment. We present three examples: the thermalization of a quantum system, the fluorescence of a driven qubit and the continuous monitoring of a qubit's observable.
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    We present an overview of the reaction coordinate approach to handling strong system-reservoir interactions in quantum thermodynamics. This technique is based on incorporating a collective degree of freedom of the reservoir (the reaction coordinate) into an enlarged system Hamiltonian (the supersystem), which is then treated explicitly. The remaining residual reservoir degrees of freedom are traced out in the usual perturbative manner. The resulting description accurately accounts for strong system-reservoir coupling and/or non-Markovian effects over a wide range of parameters, including regimes in which there is a substantial generation of system-reservoir correlations. We discuss applications to both discrete stroke and continuously operating heat engines, as well as perspectives for additional developments. In particular, we find narrow regimes where strong coupling is not detrimental to the performance of continuously operating heat engines.
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    Pulse filtering through a medium with infinite periodic structure in transmission spectrum is analyzed. Two types of filters are considered. The first, named harmonic frequency crystal (HFC), is the filter whose widths of transmitting and absorbing windows are equal. The second, named anharmonic frequency crystal (AHFC), has narrow absorption peaks separated by wide transmission windows. AHFC of moderate optical thickness demonstrates properties quite similar to those of high finesse atomic frequency comb (AFC) with limited number of the absorption peaks, which produce a few pulses from a short input pulse. On the contrary, HFC transforms the input pulse into a train of pulses whose maximum amplitudes follow a wide bell-shaped envelope. HFC allows to find an exact universal analytical solution, which describes transformation of a broadband pulse into a train of short pulses, slow light propagation for a pulse whose spectral width fits one of the transparency windows of the crystal, and absorption typical for a single line absorber if the pulse spectrum falls into one of the absorption peaks. Potential applications of HFC are discussed.
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    We study the atom-photon quantum interface with intracavity Rydberg-blocked atomic ensemble where the ground-Rydberg transition is realized by two-photon transition. Via theoretical analysis, we report our recent findings of the Jaynes-Cummings model on optical domain and robust atom-photon quantum gate enabled by this platform. The requirement on the implementation is mild which includes an optical cavity of moderately high finesse, typical alkali atoms such as Rb or Cs and the condition that cold atomic ensemble is well within the Rydberg blockade radius. The analysis focuses on the atomic ensemble's collective coupling to the quantized optical field in the cavity mode. We demonstrate its capability to serve as a controlled-PHASE gate between photonic qubits and matter qubits. The detrimental effects associated with several major decoherence factors of this system are also considered in the analysis.
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    It is shown that the quantum theoretical description of statistical data resulting from experiments with a finite number of different outcomes emerges by organizing the data such that the descriptions of the preparation and measurement stage are separated as much as possible. The quantum theoretical description that derives from this elementary principle of separation is void of the usual postulates/interpretations regarding "wave functions", "observables", "quantization rules", "Born's rule", and the like. The separation principle is illustrated by application to the Stern-Gerlach and the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohm experiment and generalizes in a trivial manner. The von Neunman equation and therefore also the Schrödinger equation are shown to follow directly from the mathematical structure that renders possible separated descriptions.
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    The central issue in quantum parameter estimation is to find out the optimal measurement setup that leads to the ultimate lower bound of an estimation error. We address here a question of whether a Gaussian measurement scheme can achieve the ultimate bound for phase estimation in single-mode Gaussian metrology that exploits single-mode Gaussian probe states in a Gaussian environment. We identify three types of optimal Gaussian measurement setups yielding the maximal Fisher information depending on displacement, squeezing, and thermalization of the probe state. We show that the homodyne measurement attains the ultimate bound for both displaced thermal probe states and squeezed vacuum probe states, whereas for the other single-mode Gaussian probe states, the optimized Gaussian measurement cannot be the optimal setup, although they are sometimes nearly optimal. We then demonstrate that the measurement on the basis of the product quadrature operators XP+PX, i.e., a non-Gaussian measurement, is required to be fully optimal.
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    Influence of noncommutativity on the motion of composite system is studied in noncommutative phase space of canonical type. A system composed by $N$ free particles is examined. We show that because of momentum noncommutativity free particles of different masses with the same velocities at the initial moment of time do not move together. The trajectory and the velocity of free particle in noncommutative phase space depend on its mass. So, a system of the free particles flies away. Also, it is shown that the total momentum defined in the traditional way is not integral of motion in a space with noncommutativity of coordinates and noncommutativity of momenta. We find that in the case when parameters of noncommutativity corresponding to a particle are determined by its mass the trajectory and velocity of free particle are independent of the mass, also the total momenta as integrals of motion can be introduced in noncommutative phase space.
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    Cavity-assisted spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) and spontaneous four-wave mixing (SFWM) in nonlinear optical materials are practical and versatile methods to generate narrowband time-energy entangled photon pairs. Time-energy entangled photons with tailored spectro-temporal properties are particularly useful for efficient quantum optical interfaces. In this work we study the generation of photon pairs in cavity-assisted SPDC and SFWM for the general case of off-resonant conversion, namely, when the frequencies of the generated photons do not match the cavity resonances. Such a frequency mismatch in particular depends on temperature and requires an additional control in the experiment. First, we propose a generic model, for description of cavity-assisted SPDC and SFWM. We show that in both processes the mismatch reduces the generation rate of photons, distorts the spectrum and the auto-correlation function of the generated fields, as well as affects the photon generation dynamics. Second, we verify the results experimentally using parametric generation of photon pairs in a nonlinear whispering gallery mode resonator (WGMR) as an experimental platform with controlled frequency mismatch. Our work reveals the role of the frequency mismatch in the photon generation process and shows a way to control it. Obtained results constitute one more step in the direction of full control over the spectro-temporal properties of entangled photon pairs and the heralded generation of single-photon pulses with a tailored temporal mode.
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    Higher-order transitions can occur in the ultrastrong-coupling regime of circuit QED through virtual processes governed by the counter-rotating interactions. We propose a feasible way to probe higher-order transitions through the scattering of propagating microwave photons incident on the hybrid qubit-cavity system. The lineshapes in the scattering spectra can indicate the coherent interaction between the qubits and the cavity, and the higher-order transitions can be identified in the population spectra. We further find that if the coupling strengths between the two qubits and the cavity are tuned to be asymmetric, the dark antisymmetric state with the Fano-lineshape can also be detected from the variations in the scattering spectra.
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    In this paper we propose two schemes for teleportation of a sub-class of tripartite states, the first one with the four-qubit cluster state and the second one with two Bell pairs as entanglement channels. A four-qubit joint measurement in the first case and two Bell measurements in the second are performed by the sender. Appropriate unitary operations on the qubits at the receiver's end along with an ancilla qubit result in the perfect teleportation of the tripartite state. Analysis of the quantum circuits employed in these schemes reveal that in our technique the desired quantum tasks are achieved with lesser quantum cost, gate count and classical communication bits compared with other similar schemes.
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    A mathematical extension of the weak value formalism to the simultaneous measurement of multiple parameters is presented in the context of an optical focused vector beam scatterometry experiment. In this example, preselection and postselection are achieved via spatially-varying polarization control, which can be tailored to optimize the sensitivity to parameter variations. Initial experiments for the two-parameter case demonstrate that this method can be used to measure physical parameters with resolutions at least 1000 times smaller than the wavelength of illumination.
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    We study the creation of a spherical, finite radius source for a quantized massless scalar field in 3+1 dimensions. The goal is to model the breakdown of correlations that has been proposed to occur at the horizon of an evaporating black hole. We do this by introducing at fixed radius $r=a$ a one parameter family of self-adjoint extensions of the three dimensional Laplacian operator that interpolate between the condition that the values and the derivatives on the two sides of $r=a$ coincide for $t\le0$ (no wall) and the two-sided Dirichlet boundary condition for $t \ge 1/\lambda$ (fully-developed wall). Creation of the shell produces null, spherical pulses of energy on either side of the shell, one ingoing and the other outgoing. The renormalized energy density $\langle T_{00}\rangle$ diverges to positive infinity in the outgoing energy pulse, just outside the light cone of the fully-formed wall at $t=1/\lambda$. Unlike in the 3+1 point source creation, there is no persistent memory cloud of energy. As in the creation of a 1+1 dimensional wall, the response of an Unruh-DeWitt detector in the post-shell region is independent of the time scale for shell formation and is finite. The latter property casts doubt on the efficacy of this mechanism for firewall creation.
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    The decay of a moving system is studied in case the system is initially prepared in a two-mass unstable quantum state. The survival probability $\mathcal{P}_p(t)$ is evaluated over short and long times in the reference frame where the unstable system moves with constant linear momentum $p$. The mass distribution densities of the two mass states are tailored as power laws with powers $\alpha_1$ and $\alpha_2$ near the non-vanishing lower bounds $\mu_{0,1}$ and $\mu_{0,2}$ of the mass spectra, respectively. If the powers $\alpha_1$ and $\alpha_2$ differ, the long-time survival probability $\mathcal{P}_p(t)$ exhibits a dominant inverse-power-law decay and is approximately related to the survival probability at rest $\mathcal{P}_0(t)$ by a time dilation. The corresponding scaling factor $\chi_{p,k}$ reads $\sqrt{1+p^2/\mu_{0,k}^2}$, the power $\alpha_k$ being the lower of the powers $\alpha_1$ and $\alpha_2$. If the two powers coincide and the lower bounds $\mu_{0,1}$ and $\mu_{0,2}$ differ, the scaling relation is lost and damped oscillations of the survival probability $\mathcal{P}_p(t)$ appear over long times. By changing reference frame, the period $T_0$ of the oscillations at rest transforms in the longer period $T_p$ according to a factor which is the weighted mean of the scaling factors of each mass, with non-normalized weights $\mu_{0,1}$ and $\mu_{0,2}$.
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    The formalism of Operational Dynamical Modeling [Phys. Rev. Lett. \bf 109, 190403 (2012)] is employed to analyze dynamics of spin half relativistic particles. We arrive at the Dirac equation from specially constructed relativistic Ehrenfest theorems by assuming that the coordinates and momenta do not commute. Forbidding creation of antiparticles and requiring the commutativity of the coordinates and momenta lead to classical Spohn's equation [Ann. Phys. \bf 282, 420 (2000)]. Moreover, Spohn's equation turns out to be the classical Koopman-von Neumann theory underlying the Dirac equation.
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    Do the wavepacket-size of free-electron wavefunction and its history have physical effect in its interaction with light? Here we answer this problem by analyzing a QED model, considering both spontaneous and stimulated emission of quantized radiation field. For coherent radiation (Glauber state), we confirm that stimulated emission/absorption of photons has a dependence on wavepacket size that decays when it exceeds the interacting radiation wavelength, consistently and complementarily with Schrodinger equation analysis of wavepacket acceleration in classical electromagnetic field. Furthermore, the stimulated emission of modulated electron wavepacket with coherently-bunched profiles has characteristic harmonic emission spectrum that is also wavepacket size dependent but beyond the frequency cut-off. In either case, there is no wavepacket dependent emission of Fock state radiation, and particularly the vacuum state spontaneous emission is wavepacket-independent. The transition of radiation emission from the classical point-particle limit to the quantum electron wavefunction limit is demonstrated in electron wavepacket representation. It indicates a way for measuring the wavepacket size of single electron wavefunction, and suggests a new direction for exploring light-matter interaction fundamentally.
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    The many-body dissipative flow induced by a mobile aussian impurity harmonically oscillating within a cigar-shaped Bose-Einstein condensate is investigated. For very small and large driving frequencies the superfluid phase is preserved. Dissipation is identified, for intermediate driving frequencies, by the non-zero value of the drag force whose abrupt increase signals the spontaneous downstream emission of an array of gray solitons. After each emission event, typically each of the solitary waves formed decays and splits into two daughter gray solitary waves that are found to be robust propagating in the bosonic background for large evolution times. In particular, a smooth transition towards dissipation is observed, with the \it critical velocity for solitary wave formation depending on both the characteristics of the obstacle, namely its driving frequency and width as well as on the interaction strength. The variance of a sample of single-shot simulations indicates the fragmented nature of the system; here it is found to increase during evolution for driving frequencies where the coherent structure formation becomes significant. Finally, we demonstrate that for fairly large particle numbers in-situ single-shot images directly capture the gray soliton's decay and splitting.
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    We show that the appropriate on-off switching of Josephson coupling between exciton-polaritons in coupled semiconductor microcavities can reveal the full capacity for generating entanglement with a recently proposed method which essentially enhances the nonlinearity of the system. The improvement achieved with this simple modulation of the coupling is substantial over the case where it is kept constant. The suggested procedure is expected to find also application in other research areas, where nonlinear interacting bosons are encountered.
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    Hexagonal Boron Nitride (hBN) mono and multilayers are promising hosts for room temperature single photon emitters (SPEs). In this work we explore high energy (~ MeV) electron irradiation as a means to generate stable SPEs in hBN. We investigate four types of exfoliated hBN flakes - namely, high purity multilayers, isotopically pure hBN, carbon rich hBN multilayers and monolayered material - and find that electron irradiation increases emitter concentrations dramatically in all samples. Furthermore, the engineered emitters are located throughout hBN flakes (not only at flake edges or grain boundaries), and do not require activation by high temperature annealing of the host material after electron exposure. Our results provide important insights into controlled formation of hBN SPEs and may aid in identification of their crystallographic origin.

Recent comments

Stefano Pirandola Apr 23 2018 12:23 UTC

The most important reading here is Sam Braunstein's foundational paper: https://authors.library.caltech.edu/3827/1/BRAprl98.pdf published in January 98, already containing the key results for the strong convergence of the CV protocol. This is a must-read for those interested in CV quantum informatio

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Mark M. Wilde Apr 23 2018 12:09 UTC

One should also consult my paper "Strong and uniform convergence in the teleportation simulation of bosonic Gaussian channels" https://arxiv.org/abs/1712.00145v4 posted in January 2018, in this context.

Stefano Pirandola Apr 23 2018 11:46 UTC

Some quick clarifications on the Braunstein-Kimble (BK) protocol for CV teleportation
and the associated teleportation simulation of bosonic channels.
(Disclaimer: the following is rather technical and CVs might not be so popular on this blog...so I guess this post will get a lot of dislikes :)

1)

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Joel Wallman Apr 18 2018 13:34 UTC

A very nice approach! Could you clarify the conclusion a little bit though? The aspirational goal for a quantum benchmark is to test how well we approximate a *specific* representation of a group (up to similarity transforms), whereas what your approach demonstrates is that without additional knowle

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Danial Dervovic Mar 01 2018 12:08 UTC

Hello again Māris, many thanks for your patience. Your comments and questions have given me much food for thought, and scope for an amended version of the paper -- please see my responses below.

Please if any of the authors of [AST17 [arXiv:1712.01609](https://arxiv.org/abs/1712.01609)] have any fu

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Beni Yoshida Feb 13 2018 19:53 UTC

This is not a direct answer to your question, but may give some intuition to formulate the problem in a more precise language. (And I simplify the discussion drastically). Consider a static slice of an empty AdS space (just a hyperbolic space) and imagine an operator which creates a particle at some

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Abhinav Deshpande Feb 10 2018 15:42 UTC

I see. Yes, the epsilon ball issue seems to be a thorny one in the prevalent definition, since the gate complexity to reach a target state from any of a fixed set of initial states depends on epsilon, and not in a very nice way (I imagine that it's all riddled with discontinuities). It would be inte

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Elizabeth Crosson Feb 10 2018 05:49 UTC

Thanks for the correction Abhinav, indeed I meant that the complexity of |psi(t)> grows linearly with t.

Producing an arbitrary state |phi> exactly is also too demanding for the circuit model, by the well-known argument that given any finite set of gates, the set of states that can be reached i

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Abhinav Deshpande Feb 09 2018 20:21 UTC

Elizabeth, interesting comment! Did you mean to say that the complexity of $U(t)$ increases linearly with $t$ as opposed to exponentially?

Also, I'm confused about your definition. First, let us assume that the initial state is well defined and is $|\psi(0)\rangle $.
If you define the complexit

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Elizabeth Crosson Feb 08 2018 04:27 UTC

The complexity of a state depends on the dynamics that one is allowed to use to generate the state. If we restrict the dynamics to be "evolving according a specific Hamiltonian H" then we immediately have that the complexity of U(t) = exp(i H t) grows exponentially with t, up until recurrences that

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