Statistical Finance (q-fin.ST)

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    Estimation of tail quantities, such as expected shortfall or Value at Risk, is a difficult problem. We show how the theory of nonlinear expectations, in particular the Data-robust expectation introduced in [4], can assist in the quantification of statistical uncertainty for these problems. However, when we are in a heavy-tailed context (in particular when our data are described by a Pareto distribution, as is common in much of extreme value theory), the theory of [4] is insufficient, and requires an additional regularization step which we introduce. By asking whether this regularization is possible, we obtain a qualitative requirement for reliable estimation of tail quantities and risk measures, in a Pareto setting.
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    A large class of trading strategies focus on opportunities offered by the yield curve. In particular, a set of yield curve trading strategies are based on the view that the yield curve mean-reverts. Based on these strategies' positive performance, a multiple pairs trading strategy on major currency pairs was implemented. To improve the algorithm's performance, machine learning forecasts of a series of pertinent macroeconomic variables were factored in, by optimizing the weights of the trading signals. This resulted in a clear improvement in the APR over the evaluation period, demonstrating that macroeconomic indicators, not only technical indicators, should be considered in trading strategies.
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    The crowd panic and its contagion play non-negligible roles at the time of the stock crash, especially for China where inexperienced investors dominate the market. However, existing models rarely consider investors in networking stocks and accordingly miss the exact knowledge of how panic contagion leads to abrupt crash. In this paper, by networking stocks of sharing common mutual funds, a new methodology of investigating the the market crash from the perspective of investor behavior is presented. It is surprisingly revealed that the herding, which origins in the mimic of seeking for high diversity across investment strategies to lower individual risk, will produce too-connected-to-fail stocks and reluctantly boosts the systemic risk of the entire market. Though too-connected stocks might be relatively stable during the crisis, they are so influential that a small downward fluctuation will cascade to trigger severe drops of massive successor stocks, implying that their disturbances might be unexpectedly amplified by the collective panic and result in the market crash. Our findings suggest that the whole picture of portfolio strategy has to be carefully supervised to reshape the stock network and highly connected stocks should be warned at early stages to avoid the market panic.