Quantitative Finance (q-fin)

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    Machine learning and AI-assisted trading have attracted growing interest for the past few years. Here, we use this approach to test the hypothesis that the inefficiency of the cryptocurrency market can be exploited to generate abnormal profits. We analyse daily data for $1,681$ cryptocurrencies for the period between Nov. 2015 and Apr. 2018. We show that simple trading strategies assisted by state-of-the-art machine learning algorithms outperform standard benchmarks. Our results show that non-trivial, but ultimately simple, algorithmic mechanisms can help anticipate the short-term evolution of the cryptocurrency market.
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    The purpose of this paper is to advance the understanding of the conditions that give rise to flash crash contagion, particularly with respect to overlapping asset portfolio crowding. To this end, we designed, implemented, and assessed a hybrid micro-macro agent-based model, where price impact arises endogenously through the limit order placement activity of algorithmic traders. Our novel hybrid microscopic and macroscopic model allows us to quantify systemic risk not just in terms of system stability, but also in terms of the speed of financial distress propagation over intraday timescales. We find that systemic risk is strongly dependent on the behaviour of algorithmic traders, on leverage management practices, and on network topology. Our results demonstrate that, for high-crowding regimes, contagion speed is a non-monotone function of portfolio diversification. We also find the surprising result that, in certain circumstances, increased portfolio crowding is beneficial to systemic stability. We are not aware of previous studies that have exhibited this phenomenon, and our results establish the importance of considering non-uniform asset allocations in future studies. Finally, we characterise the time window available for regulatory interventions during the propagation of flash crash distress, with results suggesting ex ante precautions may have higher efficacy than ex post reactions.
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    The joint Value at Risk (VaR) and expected shortfall (ES) quantile regression model of Taylor (2017) is extended via incorporating a realized measure, to drive the tail risk dynamics, as a potentially more efficient driver than daily returns. Both a maximum likelihood and an adaptive Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo method are employed for estimation, whose properties are assessed and compared via a simulation study; results favour the Bayesian approach, which is subsequently employed in a forecasting study of seven market indices and two individual assets. The proposed models are compared to a range of parametric, non-parametric and semi-parametric models, including GARCH, Realized-GARCH and the joint VaR and ES quantile regression models in Taylor (2017). The comparison is in terms of accuracy of one-day-ahead Value-at-Risk and Expected Shortfall forecasts, over a long forecast sample period that includes the global financial crisis in 2007-2008. The results favor the proposed models incorporating a realized measure, especially when employing the sub-sampled Realized Variance and the sub-sampled Realized Range.
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    In this paper we study the implications of contingent payments on the clearing wealth in a network model of financial contagion. We consider an extension of the Eisenberg-Noe financial contagion model in which the nominal interbank obligations depend on the wealth of the firms in the network. We first consider the problem in a static framework and develop conditions for existence and uniqueness of solutions as long as no firm is speculating on the failure of other firms. In order to achieve existence and uniqueness under more general conditions, we introduce a dynamic framework. We demonstrate how this dynamic framework can be applied to problems that were ill-defined in the static framework.

Recent comments

Thomas Klimpel Apr 20 2017 09:16 UTC

This paper [appeared][1] in February 2016 in the peer reviewed interdisciplinary journal Chaos by the American Institute of Physics (AIP).

It has been reviewed publicly by amateurs both [favorably][2] and [unfavorably][3]. The favorable review took the last sentence of the abstract ("These invalid

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