Tissues and Organs (q-bio.TO)

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    Objectives: To obtain a better estimate of the mortality of individuals suffering from blunt force trauma, including co-morbidity. Methodology: The Injury severity Score (ISS) is the default world standard for assessing the severity of multiple injuries. ISS is a mathematical fit to empirical field data. It is demonstrated that ISS is proportional to the Gibbs/Shannon Entropy. A new Entropy measure of morbidity from blunt force trauma including co-morbidity is derived based on the von Neumann Entropy, called the Abbreviated Morbidity Scale (AMS). Results: The ISS trauma measure has been applied to a previously published database, and good correlation has been achieved. Here the existing trauma measure is extended to include the co-morbidity of disease by calculating an Abbreviated Morbidity Score (AMS), which encapsulates the disease co-morbidity in a manner analogous to AIS, and on a consistent Entropy base. Applying Entropy measures to multiple injuries, highlights the role of co-morbidity and that the elderly die at much lower levels of injury than the general population, as a consequence of co-morbidity. These considerations lead to questions regarding current new car assessment protocols, and how well they protect the most vulnerable road users. Keywords: Blunt Force Trauma, Injury Severity Score, Co-morbidity, Entropy.
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    Background: Salinity is one of the major abiotic stresses affecting plant production in arid and semi-arid regions. It causes reduction of cultivable area and combined with other factors, presents a serious threat to food stability in these areas. Context: In front of this problem, the selection of salt tolerant species and varieties remains the best economic approach for exploitation and rehabilitation of salt-affected regions. Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the seed germination response of six Acacia species under different NaCl concentrations in order to explore opportunities for selection and breeding salt tolerant genotypes. Methods: The salinity effect was examined by measuring some agro-morphological parameters in controlled growth environment using five treatment levels: 0, 100, 200, 300 and 400 mM of NaCl. Results: The analyzed data revealed significant variability in salt response within and between species. All growth parameters were progressively reduced by increased NaCl concentrations. Growth in height, leaf number and total plant dry weight were considered as the most sensitive parameters. However, the growth reduction varied among species in accordance with their tolerance level. It is important to note that all species survived at the highest salinity (400 mM). Whereas A. horrida and A. raddiana were proved to be often the best tolerant, they recorded the lowest reduction percentage at this stage. Conclusion: The genetic variability found in the studied species at seedling stage may be used to select genotypes particularly suitable for rehabilitation and exploitation of lands affected by salinity.