Tissues and Organs (q-bio.TO)

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    Cancer is a disease of cellular regulation, often initiated by genetic mutation within cells, and leading to a heterogeneous cell population within tissues. In the competition for nutrients and growth space within the tumors the phenotype of each cell determines its success. Selection in this process is imposed by both the microenvironment (neighboring cells, extracellular matrix, and diffusing substances), and the whole of the organism through for example the blood supply. In this view, the development of tumor cells is in close interaction with their increasingly changing environment: the more cells can change, the more their environment will change. Furthermore, instabilities are also introduced on the organism level: blood supply can be blocked by increased tissue pressure or the tortuousity of the tumor-neovascular vessels. This coupling between cell, microenvironment, and organism results in behavior that is hard to predict. Here we introduce a cell-based computational model to study the effect of blood flow obstruction on the micro-evolution of cells within a tumorous tissue. We demonstrate that stages of tumor development emerge naturally, without the need for sequential mutation of specific genes. Secondly, we show that instabilities in blood supply can impact the overall development of tumors and lead to the extinction of the dominant aggressive phenotype, showing a clear distinction between the fitness at the cell level and fitness at the population level. This provides new insights into potential side effects of recent tumor vasculature renormalization approaches.
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    This paper investigates cells proliferation dynamics in small tumor cell aggregates using an individual based model (IBM). The simulation model is designed to study the morphology of the cell population and of the cell lineages as well as the impact of the orientation of the division plane on this morphology. Our IBM model is based on the hypothesis that cells are incompressible objects that grow in size and divide once a threshold size is reached, and that newly born cell adhere to the existing cell cluster. We performed comparisons between the simulation model and experimental data by using several statistical indicators. The results suggest that the emergence of particular morphologies can be explained by simple mechanical interactions.