Quantitative Methods (q-bio.QM)

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    In this paper we investigate the complexity of model selection and model testing in chemical reaction networks by formulating them as Euclidean distance problems. We determine closed form expressions for the Euclidean distance degree of the steady state varieties associated to several different families of toric chemical reaction networks with arbitrarily many reaction sites. We show how our results can be used as a metric for the computational cost of solving the model testing and model selection problems.
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    We propose a novel computational method to extract information about interactions among individuals with different behavioral states in a biological collective from ordinary video recordings. Assuming that individuals are acting as finite state machines, our method first detects discrete behavioral states of those individuals and then constructs a model of their state transitions, taking into account the positions and states of other individuals in the vicinity. We have tested the proposed method through applications to two real-world biological collectives, termites in an experimental setting and human pedestrians in an open space. For each application, a robust tracking system was developed in-house, utilizing interactive human intervention (for termite tracking) or online agent-based simulation (for pedestrian tracking). In both cases, significant interactions were detected between nearby individuals with different states, demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed method.
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    The motion of social insects constitute beautiful examples of adaptive collective dynamics born out of apparent purposeless individual behavior. In this paper we revisit the topic of the ruling laws behind burst of activity in ants. The analysis, done over previously reported data, reconsider the proposed causation arrows, not finding any link between the duration of the ants activity and its moving speed. Secondly, synthetic trajectories created from steps of different ants, demonstrate that an additive stochastic process can explain the previously reported speed shape profile. Finally we show that as more ants enter the nest, the faster they move, which implies a collective property. Overall these results provides a mechanistic explanation for the reported behavioral laws, and suggest a formal way to further study the collective properties in these scenarios.