Quantitative Methods (q-bio.QM)

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    The Morris Water Maze is commonly used in behavioural neuroscience for the study of spatial learning with rodents. Over the years, various methods of analysing rodent data collected in this task have been proposed. These methods span from classical performance measurements (e.g. escape latency, rodent speed, quadrant preference) to more sophisticated methods of categorisation which classify the animal swimming path into behavioural classes known as strategies. Classification techniques provide additional insight in relation to the actual animal behaviours but still only a limited amount of studies utilise them mainly because they highly depend on machine learning knowledge. We have previously demonstrated that the animals implement various strategies and by classifying whole trajectories can lead to the loss of important information. In this work, we developed a generalised and robust classification methodology which implements majority voting to boost the classification performance and successfully nullify the need of manual tuning. Based on this framework, we built a complete software, capable of performing the full analysis described in this paper. The software provides an easy to use graphical user interface (GUI) through which users can enter their trajectory data, segment and label them and finally generate reports and figures of the results.
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    Motivation: The selection of high-affinity aptamers is of paramount interest for clinical and technological applications. A computational investigation to evaluate the relative binding ability of a group of anti- Angiopoietin-2 aptamers is proposed and tested against data already available in the literature. Results: The procedure consists of three steps: a. the production of a large set of conformations for each candidate aptamer; b. the rigid docking upon the receptor; c. the topological and electrical characterization of the products. Steps a and b allow a global binding score of the ligand-receptor complexes, based on the distribution of the "effective affinity", i.e. the sum of the conformational and the docking energies. Step c. employes a complex network approach (Proteotronics) to characterize the electrical properties of the aptamers and the complexes. Finally, a comparison of the theoretical results with the measurements obtained for the same aptamers in experiments on the SPR biosensor is performed, revealing a good agreement.
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    Throughout the animal kingdom, animals frequently benefit from living in groups. Models of collective behaviour show that simple local interactions are sufficient to generate group morphologies found in nature (swarms, flocks and mills). However, individuals also interact with the complex noisy environment in which they live. In this work, we experimentally investigate the group performance in navigating a noisy light gradient of two unrelated freshwater species: golden shiners (Notemigonus crysoleucas) and rummy nose tetra (Hemigrammus bleheri). We find that tetras outperform shiners due to their innate individual ability to sense the environmental gradient. Using numerical simulations, we examine how group performance depends on the relative weight of social and environmental information. Our results highlight the importance of balancing of social and environmental information to promote optimal group morphologies and performance.