Quantitative Methods (q-bio.QM)

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    In recent years, the number of papers on Alzheimer's disease classification has increased dramatically, generating interesting methodological ideas on the use machine learning and feature extraction methods. However, practical impact is much more limited and, eventually, one could not tell which of these approaches are the most efficient. While over 90\% of these works make use of ADNI an objective comparison between approaches is impossible due to variations in the subjects included, image pre-processing, performance metrics and cross-validation procedures. In this paper, we propose a framework for reproducible classification experiments using multimodal MRI and PET data from ADNI. The core components are: 1) code to automatically convert the full ADNI database into BIDS format; 2) a modular architecture based on Nipype in order to easily plug-in different classification and feature extraction tools; 3) feature extraction pipelines for MRI and PET data; 4) baseline classification approaches for unimodal and multimodal features. This provides a flexible framework for benchmarking different feature extraction and classification tools in a reproducible manner. We demonstrate its use on all (1519) baseline T1 MR images and all (1102) baseline FDG PET images from ADNI 1, GO and 2 with SPM-based feature extraction pipelines and three different classification techniques (linear SVM, anatomically regularized SVM and multiple kernel learning SVM). The highest accuracies achieved were: 91% for AD vs CN, 83% for MCIc vs CN, 75% for MCIc vs MCInc, 94% for AD-A$\beta$+ vs CN-A$\beta$- and 72% for MCIc-A$\beta$+ vs MCInc-A$\beta$+. The code is publicly available at https://gitlab.icm-institute.org/aramislab/AD-ML (depends on the Clinica software platform, publicly available at http://www.clinica.run).
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    BackgroundLowering the gut exposure to antibiotics during treatments can prevent microbiota disruption. We evaluated the effect of an activated charcoal-based adsorbent, DAV131A, on fecal free moxifloxacin concentration and mortality in a hamster model of moxifloxacin-induced C. difficile infection.Methods215 hamsters receiving moxifloxacin subcutaneously (D1-D5) were orally infected at D3 with C. difficile spores. They received various doses (0-1800mg/kg/day) and schedules (BID, TID) of DAV131A (D1-D8). Moxifloxacin concentration and C. difficile counts were determined at D3, and mortality at D12. We compared mortality, moxifloxacin concentration and C. difficile counts according to DAV131A regimens, and modelled the link between DAV131A regimen, moxifloxacin concentration and mortality. ResultsAll hamsters that received no DAV131A died, but none of those that received 1800mg/kg/day. A significant dose-dependent relationship between DAV131A dose and (i) mortality rates, (ii) moxifloxacin concentration and (iii) C. difficile counts was evidenced. Mathematical modeling suggested that (i) lowering moxifloxacin concentration at D3, which was 58$\mu$g/g (95%CI=50-66) without DAV131A, to 17$\mu$g/g (14-21) would reduce mortality by 90% and (ii) this would be achieved with a daily DAV131A dose of 703mg/kg (596-809).ConclusionsIn this model of C. difficile infection, DAV131A reduced mortality in a dose-dependent manner by decreasing fecal free moxifloxacin concentration.
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    We consider a new concept of biometric-based cybersecurity systems for active authentication by continuous tracking, which utilizes biochemical processing of metabolites present in skin secretions. Skin secretions contain a large number of metabolites and small molecules that can be targeted for analysis. Here we argue that amino acids found in sweat can be exploited for the establishment of an amino acid profile capable of identifying an individual user of a mobile or wearable device. Individual and combinations of amino acids processed by biocatalytic cascades yield physical (optical or electronic) signals, providing a time-series of several outputs that, in their entirety, should suffice to authenticate a specific user based on standard statistical criteria. Initial results, motivated by biometrics, indicate that single amino acid levels can provide analog signals that vary according to the individual donor, albeit with limited resolution versus noise. However, some such assays offer digital separation (into well-defined ranges of values) according to groups such as age, biological sex, race, and physiological state of the individual. Multi-input biocatalytic cascades that handle several amino acid signals to yield a single digital-type output, as well as continuous-tracking time-series data rather than a single-instance sample, should enable active authentication at the level of an individual.