Quantitative Methods (q-bio.QM)

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    The event-based model (EBM) for data-driven disease progression modeling estimates the sequence in which biomarkers for a disease become abnormal. This helps in understanding the dynamics of disease progression and facilitates early diagnosis by staging patients on a disease progression timeline. Existing EBM methods are all generative in nature. In this work we propose a novel discriminative approach to EBM, which is shown to be more accurate as well as computationally more efficient than existing state-of-the art EBM methods. The method first estimates for each subject an approximate ordering of events, by ranking the posterior probabilities of individual biomarkers being abnormal. Subsequently, the central ordering over all subjects is estimated by fitting a generalized Mallows model to these approximate subject-specific orderings based on a novel probabilistic Kendall's Tau distance. To evaluate the accuracy, we performed extensive experiments on synthetic data simulating the progression of Alzheimer's disease. Subsequently, the method was applied to the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) data to estimate the central event ordering in the dataset. The experiments benchmark the accuracy of the new model under various conditions and compare it with existing state-of-the-art EBM methods. The results indicate that discriminative EBM could be a simple and elegant approach to disease progression modeling.
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    Hypothesis generation is becoming a crucial time-saving technique which allows biomedical researchers to quickly discover implicit connections between important concepts. Typically, these systems operate on domain-specific fractions of public medical data. MOLIERE, in contrast, utilizes information from over 24.5 million documents. At the heart of our approach lies a multi-modal and multi-relational network of biomedical objects extracted from several heterogeneous datasets from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). These objects include but are not limited to scientific papers, keywords, genes, proteins, diseases, and diagnoses. We model hypotheses using Latent Dirichlet Allocation applied on abstracts found near shortest paths discovered within this network, and demonstrate the effectiveness of MOLIERE by performing hypothesis generation on historical data. Our network, implementation, and resulting data are all publicly available for the broad scientific community.
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    Boolean matrix factorisation (BooMF) infers interpretable decompositions of a binary data matrix into a pair of low-rank, binary matrices: One containing meaningful patterns, the other quantifying how the observations can be expressed as a combination of these patterns. We introduce the OrMachine, a probabilistic generative model for BooMF and derive a Metropolised Gibbs sampler that facilitates very efficient parallel posterior inference. Our method outperforms all currently existing approaches for Boolean Matrix factorization and completion, as we show on simulated and real world data. This is the first method to provide full posterior inference for BooMF which is relevant in applications, e.g. for controlling false positive rates in collaborative filtering, and crucially it improves the interpretability of the inferred patterns. The proposed algorithm scales to large datasets as we demonstrate by analysing single cell gene expression data in 1.3 million mouse brain cells across 11,000 genes on commodity hardware.
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    Consider the problem of modeling hysteresis for finite-state random walks using higher-order Markov chains. This Letter introduces a Bayesian framework to determine, from data, the number of prior states of recent history upon which a trajectory is statistically dependent. The general recommendation is to use leave-one-out cross validation, using an easily-computable formula that is provided in closed form. Importantly, Bayes factors using flat model priors are biased in favor of too-complex a model (more hysteresis) when a large amount of data is present and the Akaike information criterion (AIC) is biased in favor of too-sparse a model (less hysteresis) when few data are present.