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Populations and Evolution (q-bio.PE)

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    This work consists of an epidemic model with vaccination coupled with an opinion dynamics. Our objective was to study how disease risk perception can influence opinions about vaccination and therefore the spreading of the disease. Differently from previous works we have considered continuous opinions. The epidemic spreading is governed by a SIS-like model with an extra vaccinated state. In our model individuals vaccinate with a probability proportional to their opinions. The opinions change due to peer influence in pairwise interactions. The epidemic feedback to the opinion dynamics acts as an external field increasing the vaccination probability. We performed Monte Carlo simulations in fully-connected populations. Interestingly we observed the emergence of a first-order phase transition, besides the usual active-absorbing phase transition presented in the SIS model. Our simulations also show that with a certain combination of parameters, an increment in the initial fraction of the population that is pro-vaccine has a twofold effect: it can lead to smaller epidemic outbreaks in the short term, but it also contributes to the survival of the chain of infections in the long term. Our results also suggest that it is possible that more effective vaccines can decrease the long-term vaccine coverage. This is a counterintuitive outcome, but it is in line with empirical observations that vaccines can become a victim of their own success.

Recent comments

C. Jess Riedel Jul 04 2017 21:26 UTC

Even if we kickstart evolution with bacteria, the amount of time until we are capable of von Neumann probes is almost certainly too small for this to be relevant. See for instance [Armstrong & Sandberg](http://www.sciencedirect.com.proxy.lib.uwaterloo.ca/science/article/pii/S0094576513001148). It

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xecehim Jun 27 2017 15:03 UTC

It has been [published][1]

[1]: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10509-016-2911-0

wiadealo Nov 07 2016 09:27 UTC

Is it [fantasy][1] or real?

[1]: http://buchderfarben.de

climaiw Sep 12 2016 16:19 UTC

I would suggest planets where life can really make a difference.

resodiat Aug 23 2016 13:00 UTC

That is really a long-term perspective.