Neurons and Cognition (q-bio.NC)

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    Brains need to predict how our muscles and body react to motor commands. How networks of spiking neurons can learn to reproduce these non-linear dynamics, using local, online and stable learning rules, is an important, open question. Here, we present a supervised learning scheme for the feedforward and recurrent connections in a network of heterogeneous spiking neurons. The error in the output is fed back through fixed random connections with a negative gain, causing the network to follow the desired dynamics, while an online and local rule changes the weights; hence we call the scheme FOLLOW (Feedback-based Online Local Learning Of Weights) The rule is local in the sense that weight changes depend on the presynaptic activity and the error signal projected onto the post-synaptic neuron. We provide examples of learning linear, non-linear and chaotic dynamics, as well as the dynamics of a two-link arm. Using the Lyapunov method, and under reasonable assumptions and approximations, we show that FOLLOW learning is uniformly stable, with the error going to zero asymptotically.
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    Line attractors in neural networks have been suggested to be the basis of many brain functions, such as working memory, oculomotor control, head direction, locomotion, and sensory processing. In recent work, we incorporated pulse gating into feedforward neural networks and showed that the transmission of graded information can be viewed as a line attractor in the firing rate of transiently synchronous populations. While this was revealed in an analysis using rate models, graded information transfer persisted in spiking neural networks and was robust to intrinsic and extrinsic noise. Here, using a Fokker-Planck approach, we show that the gradedness of rate amplitude information transmission in pulse-gated networks is associated with the existence of a cusp catastrophe, and that the slow dynamics near the fold of the cusp underlies the robustness of the line attractor. Understanding the dynamical aspects of this cusp catastrophe allows us to show how line attractors can persist in biologically realistic neuronal networks and how the interplay of pulse gating, synaptic coupling and neuronal stochasticity can be used to enable attracting one-dimensional manifolds and thus, dynamically control graded information processing.
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    We present here a browser-based application for visualizing patterns of connectivity in 3D stacked data matrices with large numbers of pairwise relations. Visualizing a connectivity matrix, looking for trends and patterns, and dynamically manipulating these values is a challenge for scientists from diverse fields, including neuroscience and genomics. In particular, high-dimensional neural data include those acquired via electroencephalography (EEG), electrocorticography (ECoG), magnetoencephalography (MEG), and functional MRI. Neural connectivity data contains multivariate attributes for each edge between different brain regions, which motivated our lightweight, open source, easy-to-use visualization tool for the exploration of these connectivity matrices to highlight connections of interest. Here we present a client-side, mobile-compatible visualization tool written entirely in HTML5/JavaScript that allows in-browser manipulation of user-defined files for exploration of brain connectivity. Visualizations can highlight different aspects of the data simultaneously across different dimensions. Input files are in JSON format, and custom Python scripts have been written to parse MATLAB or Python data files into JSON-loadable format. We demonstrate the analysis of connectivity data acquired via human ECoG recordings as a domain-specific implementation of our application. We envision applications for this interactive tool in fields seeking to visualize pairwise connectivity.
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    Our century has unprecedented new challenges, which need creative solutions and deep thinking. Contemplative, deep thinking became an "endangered species" in our rushing world of Tweets, elevator pitches and fast decisions. Here we describe that important aspects of both creativity and deep thinking can be understood as network phenomena of conceptual and social networks. "Creative nodes" occupy highly dynamic, boundary spanning positions in social networks. Creative thinking requires alternating plasticity-dominated and rigidity-dominated mindsets, which can be helped by dynamically changing social network structures. In the closing section we present three case studies which demonstrate the applications of the concept in the Hungarian research student movement, the Hungarian Templeton Program and the Youth Platform of the European Talent Support Network. These examples show how talent support programs can mobilize the power of social networks to enhance creative, deliberative, deep thinking of talented young minds, influencing social opinion, leading to community action, and developing charismatic leadership skills.
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    Identification of intended movement type and movement phase of hand grasp shaping are critical features for the control of volitional neuroprosthetics. We demonstrate that neural dynamics during visually-guided imagined grasp shaping can encode intended movement. We apply Procrustes analysis and LASSO regression to achieve 72% accuracy (chance = 25%) in distinguishing between visually-guided imagined grasp trajectories. Further, we can predict the stage of grasp shaping in the form of elapsed time from start of trial (R2=0.4). Our approach contributes to more accurate single-trial decoding of higher-level movement goals and the phase of grasping movements in individuals not trained with brain-computer interfaces. We also find that the overall time-varying trajectory structure of imagined movements tend to be consistent within individuals, and that transient trajectory deviations within trials return to the task-dependent trajectory mean. These overall findings may contribute to the further understanding of the cortical dynamics of human motor imagery.