Neurons and Cognition (q-bio.NC)

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    Machine learning models are vulnerable to adversarial examples: small changes to images can cause computer vision models to make mistakes such as identifying a school bus as an ostrich. However, it is still an open question whether humans are prone to similar mistakes. Here, we create the first adversarial examples designed to fool humans, by leveraging recent techniques that transfer adversarial examples from computer vision models with known parameters and architecture to other models with unknown parameters and architecture, and by modifying models to more closely match the initial processing of the human visual system. We find that adversarial examples that strongly transfer across computer vision models influence the classifications made by time-limited human observers.
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    The standard state space model is widely believed to account for the cerebellar computation in motor adaptation tasks [1]. Here we show that several recent experiments [2-4] where the visual feedback is irrelevant to the motor response challenge the standard model. Furthermore, we propose a new model that accounts for the the results presented in [2-4]. According to this new model, learning and forgetting are coupled and are error size dependent. We also show that under reasonable assumptions, our proposed model is the only model that accounts for both the classical adaptation paradigm as well as the recent experiments [2-4].
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    Neural networks modularity is a major challenge for the development of control circuits of neural activity. Under physiological limitations, the accessible regions for external stimulation are possibly different from the functionally relevant ones, requiring complex indirect control designs. Moreover, control over one region might affect activity of other downstream networks, once sparse connections exist. We address these questions by developing a hybrid device of a cortical culture functionally integrated with a biomimetic hardware neural network. This design enables the study of modular networks controllability, while connectivity is well-defined and key features of cortical networks are accessible. Using a closed-loop control to monitor the activity of the coupled hybrid, we show that both modules are congruently modified, in the macroscopic as well as the microscopic activity levels. Control impacts efficiently the activity on both sides whether the control circuit is an indirect series one, or implemented independently only on one of the modules. Hence, these results present global functional impacts of a local control intervention. Overall, this strategy provides an experimental access to the controllability of neural activity irregularities, when embedded in a modular organization.