Neurons and Cognition (q-bio.NC)

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    Brain-Machine Interaction (BMI) system motivates interesting and promising results in forward/feedback control consistent with human intention. It holds great promise for advancements in patient care and applications to neurorehabilitation. Here, we propose a novel neurofeedback-based BCI robotic platform using a personalized social robot in order to assist patients having cognitive deficits through bilateral rehabilitation and mental training. For initial testing of the platform, electroencephalography (EEG) brainwaves of a human user were collected in real time during tasks of imaginary movements. First, the brainwaves associated with imagined body kinematics parameters were decoded to control a cursor on a computer screen in training protocol. Then, the experienced subject was able to interact with a social robot via our real-time BMI robotic platform. Corresponding to subject's imagery performance, he/she received specific gesture movements and eye color changes as neural-based feedback from the robot. This hands-free neurofeedback interaction not only can be used for mind control of a social robot's movements, but also sets the stage for application to enhancing and recovering mental abilities such as attention via training in humans by providing real-time neurofeedback from a social robot.
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    A core aspect of human intelligence is the ability to learn new tasks quickly and switch between them flexibly. Here, we describe a modular continual reinforcement learning paradigm inspired by these abilities. We first introduce a visual interaction environment that allows many types of tasks to be unified in a single framework. We then describe a reward map prediction scheme that learns new tasks robustly in the very large state and action spaces required by such an environment. We investigate how properties of module architecture influence efficiency of task learning, showing that a module motif incorporating specific design principles (e.g. early bottlenecks, low-order polynomial nonlinearities, and symmetry) significantly outperforms more standard neural network motifs, needing fewer training examples and fewer neurons to achieve high levels of performance. Finally, we present a meta-controller architecture for task switching based on a dynamic neural voting scheme, which allows new modules to use information learned from previously-seen tasks to substantially improve their own learning efficiency.
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    We introduce a novel data-driven approach to discover and decode features in the neural code coming from large population neural recordings with minimal assumptions, using cohomological learning. We apply our approach to neural recordings of mice moving freely in a box, where we find a circular feature. We then observe that the decoded value corresponds well to the head direction of the mouse. Thus we capture head direction cells and decode the head direction from the neural population activity without having to process the behaviour of the mouse. Interestingly, the decoded values convey more information about the neural activity than the tracked head direction does, with differences that have some spatial organization. Finally, we note that the residual population activity, after the head direction has been accounted for, retains some low-dimensional structure but with no discernible shape.
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    We propose a fusion approach that combines features from simultaneously recorded electroencephalographic (EEG) and magnetoencephalographic (MEG) signals to improve classification performances in motor imagery-based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). We applied our approach to a group of 15 healthy subjects and found a significant classification performance enhancement as compared to standard single-modality approaches in the alpha and beta bands. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the advantage of considering multimodal approaches as complementary tools for improving the impact of non-invasive BCIs.
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    Flow is a hyper-engaged state of consciousness most commonly described in athletics, popularly termed being in the zone. Quantitative research into flow has been hampered by the disruptive nature of gathering subjective reports. Here we show that a passive probe (suppression of Auditory Evoked Potential in EEG) that allowed our participants to remain engaged in a first-person shooting game while we continually tracked the depth of their immersion corresponded with the participants' subjective experiences, and with their objective performance levels. Comparing this time-varying record of flow against the overall EEG record, we identified neural correlates of flow in the anterior cingulate cortex and the temporal pole. These areas displayed increased beta band activity, mutual connectivity, and feedback connectivity with primary motor cortex. These results corroborate the notion that the flow state is an objective and quantifiable state of consciousness, which we identify and characterize across subjective, behavioral and neural measures.