Neurons and Cognition (q-bio.NC)

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    In voxel-based neuroimage analysis, lesion features have been the main focus in disease prediction due to their interpretability with respect to the related diseases. However, we observe that there exists another type of features introduced during the preprocessing steps and we call them "\textbfProcedural Bias". Besides, such bias can be leveraged to improve classification accuracy. Nevertheless, most existing models suffer from either under-fit without considering procedural bias or poor interpretability without differentiating such bias from lesion ones. In this paper, a novel dual-task algorithm namely \emphGSplit LBI is proposed to resolve this problem. By introducing an augmented variable enforced to be structural sparsity with a variable splitting term, the estimators for prediction and selecting lesion features can be optimized separately and mutually monitored by each other following an iterative scheme. Empirical experiments have been evaluated on the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative\thinspace(ADNI) database. The advantage of proposed model is verified by improved stability of selected lesion features and better classification results.
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    Recurrently coupled networks of inhibitory neurons robustly generate oscillations in the gamma band. Nonetheless, the corresponding Wilson-Cowan type firing rate equation for such an inhibitory population does not generate such oscillations without an explicit time delay. We show that this discrepancy is due to a voltage-dependent spike-synchronization mechanism inherent in networks of spiking neurons which is not captured by standard firing rate equations. Here we investigate an exact low-dimensional description for a network of heterogeneous canonical type-I inhibitory neurons which includes the sub-threshold dynamics crucial for generating synchronous states. In the limit of slow synaptic kinetics the spike-synchrony mechanism is suppressed and the standard Wilson-Cowan equations are formally recovered as long as external inputs are also slow. However, even in this limit synchronous spiking can be elicited by inputs which fluctuate on a time-scale of the membrane time-constant of the neurons. Our meanfield equations therefore represent an extension of the standard Wilson-Cowan equations in which spike synchrony is also correctly described.
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    Reinforcement learning (RL) has recently regained popularity, with major achievements such as beating the European game of Go champion. Here, for the first time, we show that RL can be used efficiently to train a spiking neural network (SNN) to perform object recognition in natural images without using an external classifier. We used a feedforward convolutional SNN and a temporal coding scheme where the most strongly activated neurons fire first, while less activated ones fire later, or not at all. In the highest layers, each neuron was assigned to an object category, and it was assumed that the stimulus category was the category of the first neuron to fire. If this assumption was correct, the neuron was rewarded, i.e. spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) was applied, which reinforced the neuron's selectivity. Otherwise, anti-STDP was applied, which encouraged the neuron to learn something else. As demonstrated on various image datasets (Caltech, ETH-80, and NORB), this reward modulated STDP (R-STDP) approach extracted particularly discriminative visual features, whereas classic unsupervised STDP extracts any feature that consistently repeats. As a result, R-STDP outperformed STDP on these datasets. Furthermore, R-STDP is suitable for online learning, and can adapt to drastic changes such as label permutations. Finally, it is worth mentioning that both feature extraction and classification were done with spikes, using at most one spike per neuron. Thus the network is hardware friendly and energy efficient.
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    The 'free energy principle' (FEP) has been suggested to provide a unified theory of the brain, integrating data and theory relating to action, perception, and learning. The theory and implementation of the FEP combines insights from Helmholtzian 'perception as inference', machine learning theory, and statistical thermodynamics. Here, we provide a detailed mathematical evaluation of a suggested biologically plausible implementation of the FEP that has been widely used to develop the theory. Our objectives are (i) to describe within a single article the mathematical structure of this implementation of the FEP; (ii) provide a simple but complete agent-based model utilising the FEP; (iii) disclose the assumption structure of this implementation of the FEP to help elucidate its significance for the brain sciences.