Neurons and Cognition (q-bio.NC)

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    In recent years, the number of papers on Alzheimer's disease classification has increased dramatically, generating interesting methodological ideas on the use machine learning and feature extraction methods. However, practical impact is much more limited and, eventually, one could not tell which of these approaches are the most efficient. While over 90\% of these works make use of ADNI an objective comparison between approaches is impossible due to variations in the subjects included, image pre-processing, performance metrics and cross-validation procedures. In this paper, we propose a framework for reproducible classification experiments using multimodal MRI and PET data from ADNI. The core components are: 1) code to automatically convert the full ADNI database into BIDS format; 2) a modular architecture based on Nipype in order to easily plug-in different classification and feature extraction tools; 3) feature extraction pipelines for MRI and PET data; 4) baseline classification approaches for unimodal and multimodal features. This provides a flexible framework for benchmarking different feature extraction and classification tools in a reproducible manner. We demonstrate its use on all (1519) baseline T1 MR images and all (1102) baseline FDG PET images from ADNI 1, GO and 2 with SPM-based feature extraction pipelines and three different classification techniques (linear SVM, anatomically regularized SVM and multiple kernel learning SVM). The highest accuracies achieved were: 91% for AD vs CN, 83% for MCIc vs CN, 75% for MCIc vs MCInc, 94% for AD-A$\beta$+ vs CN-A$\beta$- and 72% for MCIc-A$\beta$+ vs MCInc-A$\beta$+. The code is publicly available at https://gitlab.icm-institute.org/aramislab/AD-ML (depends on the Clinica software platform, publicly available at http://www.clinica.run).
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    Introduction: Identification of blood-based metabolic changes might provide early and easy-to-obtain biomarkers. Methods: We included 127 AD patients and 121 controls with CSF-biomarker-confirmed diagnosis (cut-off tau/A$\beta_{42}$: 0.52). Mass spectrometry platforms determined the concentrations of 53 amine, 22 organic acid, 120 lipid, and 40 oxidative stress compounds. Multiple signatures were assessed: differential expression (nested linear models), classification (logistic regression), and regulatory (network extraction). Results: Twenty-six metabolites were differentially expressed. Metabolites improved the classification performance of clinical variables from 74% to 79%. Network models identified 5 hubs of metabolic dysregulation: Tyrosine, glycylglycine, glutamine, lysophosphatic acid C18:2 and platelet activating factor C16:0. The metabolite network for APOE $\epsilon$4 negative AD patients was less cohesive compared to the network for APOE $\epsilon$4 positive AD patients. Discussion: Multiple signatures point to various promising peripheral markers for further validation. The network differences in AD patients according to APOE genotype may reflect different pathways to AD.
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    Quantifying the similarity between two networks is critical in many applications. A number of algorithms have been proposed to compute graph similarity, mainly based on the properties of nodes and edges. Interestingly, most of these algorithms ignore the physical location of the nodes, which is a key factor in the context of brain networks involving spatially defined functional areas. In this paper, we present a novel algorithm called "SimiNet" for measuring similarity between two graphs whose nodes are defined a priori within a 3D coordinate system. SimiNet provides a quantified index (ranging from 0 to 1) that accounts for node, edge and spatiality features. Complex graphs were simulated to evaluate the performance of SimiNet that is compared with eight state-of-art methods. Results show that SimiNet is able to detect weak spatial variations in compared graphs in addition to computing similarity using both nodes and edges. SimiNet was also applied to real brain networks obtained during a visual recognition task. The algorithm shows high performance to detect spatial variation of brain networks obtained during a naming task of two categories of visual stimuli: animals and tools. A perspective to this work is a better understanding of object categorization in the human brain.