Neurons and Cognition (q-bio.NC)

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    Hair cells, the sensory receptors of the internal ear, subserve different functions in various receptor organs: they detect oscillatory stimuli in the auditory system, but transduce constant and step stimuli in the vestibular and lateral-line systems. We show that a hair cell's function can be controlled experimentally by adjusting its mechanical load. By making bundles from a single organ operate as any of four distinct types of signal detector, we demonstrate that altering only a few key parameters can fundamentally change a sensory cell's role. The motions of a single hair bundle can resemble those of a bundle from the amphibian vestibular system, the reptilian auditory system, or the mammalian auditory system, demonstrating an essential similarity of bundles across species and receptor organs.
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    Beta oscillations observed in motor cortical local field potentials (LFPs) recorded on separate electrodes of a multi-electrode array have been shown to exhibit non-zero phase shifts that organize into a planar wave propagation. Here, we generalize this concept by introducing additional classes of patterns that fully describe the spatial organization of beta oscillations. During a delayed reach-to-grasp task in monkey primary motor and dorsal premotor cortices we distinguish planar, synchronized, random, circular, and radial phase patterns. We observe that specific patterns correlate with the beta amplitude (envelope). In particular, wave propagation accelerates with growing amplitude, and culminates at maximum amplitude in a synchronized pattern. Furthermore, the occurrence probability of a particular pattern is modulated with behavioral epochs: Planar waves and synchronized patterns are more present during movement preparation where beta amplitudes are large, whereas random phase patterns are dominant during movement execution where beta amplitudes are small.
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    The brain processes visual inputs having structure over a large range of spatial scales. The precise mechanisms or algorithms used by the brain to achieve this feat are largely unknown and an open problem in visual neuroscience. In particular, the spatial extent in visual space over which primary visual cortex (V1) performs evidence integration has been shown to change as a function of contrast and other visual parameters, thus adapting scale in visual space in an input-dependent manner. We demonstrate that a simple dynamical mechanism---dynamical criticality---can simultaneously account for the well-documented input-dependence characteristics of three properties of V1: scales of integration in visuotopic space, extents of lateral integration on the cortical surface, and response latencies.