Genomics (q-bio.GN)

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    We construct genomic predictors for heritable and extremely complex human quantitative traits (height, heel bone density, and educational attainment) using modern methods in high dimensional statistics (i.e., machine learning). Replication tests show that these predictors capture, respectively, $\sim$40, 20, and 9 percent of total variance for the three traits. For example, predicted heights correlate $\sim$0.65 with actual height; actual heights of most individuals in validation samples are within a few cm of the prediction. The variance captured for height is comparable to the estimated SNP heritability from GCTA (GREML) analysis, and seems to be close to its asymptotic value (i.e., as sample size goes to infinity), suggesting that we have captured most of the heritability for the SNPs used. Thus, our results resolve the common SNP portion of the "missing heritability" problem -- i.e., the gap between prediction R-squared and SNP heritability. The $\sim$20k activated SNPs in our height predictor reveal the genetic architecture of human height, at least for common SNPs. Our primary dataset is the UK Biobank cohort, comprised of almost 500k individual genotypes with multiple phenotypes. We also use other datasets and SNPs found in earlier GWAS for out-of-sample validation of our results.
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    The Spliced Alignment Problem (SAP) that consists in finding an optimal semi-global alignment of a spliced RNA sequence on an unspliced genomic sequence has been largely considered for the prediction and the annotation of gene structures in genomes. Here, we re-visit it for the purpose of identifying CDS ortholog groups within a set of CDS from homologous genes and for computing multiple CDS alignments. We introduce a new constrained version of the spliced alignment problem together with an algorithm that exploits full information on the exon-intron structure of the input RNA and gene sequences in order to compute high-coverage accurate alignments. We show how pairwise spliced alignments between the CDS and the gene sequences of a gene family can be directly used in order to clusterize the set of CDS of the gene family into a set of ortholog groups. We also introduce an extension of the spliced alignment problem called Multiple Spliced Alignment Problem (MSAP) that consists in aligning simultaneously several RNA sequences on several genes from the same gene family. We develop a heuristic algorithmic solution for the problem. We show how to exploit multiple spliced alignments for the clustering of homologous CDS into ortholog and close paralog groups, and for the construction of multiple CDS alignments. An implementation of the method in Python is available on demande to SFA@USherbrooke.ca. Keywords: Spliced alignment, CDS ortholog groups, Multiple CDS alignment, Gene structure, Gene family.