Biomolecules (q-bio.BM)

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    ATP synthases utilize a proton motive force to synthesize ATP. In reverse, these membrane-embedded enzymes can also hydrolyze ATP to pump protons over the membrane. To prevent wasteful ATP hydrolysis, distinct control mechanisms exist for ATP synthases in bacteria, archaea, chloroplasts and mitochondria. Single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) demonstrated that the C-terminus of the rotary subunit epsilon in the Escherichia coli enzyme changes its conformation to block ATP hydrolysis. Previously we investigated the related conformational changes of subunit F of the A1AO-ATP synthase from the archaeon Methanosarcina mazei Gö1. Here, we analyze the lifetimes of fluorescence donor and acceptor dyes to distinguish between smFRET signals for conformational changes and potential artefacts.
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    We study the solvation free energy of two different conformations (helix and extended) of two different peptides (deca-alanine and deca-glycine) in two different solvents (water and aqueous guanidinium chloride, GdmCl). The free energies are obtained using the quasichemical organization of the potential distribution theorem, an approach that naturally provides the repulsive (solvophobic or cavity) and attractive (solvophilic) contributions to solvation. The solvophilic contribution is further parsed into a chemistry contribution arising from solute interaction with the solvent in the first solvation shell and a long-range contribution arising from non-specific interactions between the solute and the solvent beyond the first solvation shell. The cavity contribution is obtained for two different envelopes, $\Sigma_{SE}$ which theory identifies as the solvent excluded volume and a larger envelope ($\Sigma_G$) beyond which solute-solvent interactions are Gaussian. For both envelopes, the cavity contribution in water is proportional to the surface area of the envelope. The same does not hold for GdmCl(aq), revealing limitations of using molecular area to assess solvation energetics, especially in mixed solvents. The $\Sigma_G$-cavity contribution predicts that GdmCl(aq) should favor the more compact state, contrary to the role of GdmCl in unfolding proteins. The chemistry contribution attenuates this effect, but still the net local (chemistry plus $\Sigma_G$-packing) contribution is inadequate in capturing the role of GdmCl. With the inclusion of the long-range contribution, which is dominated by van~der~Waals interaction, aqueous GdmCl favors the extended conformation over the compact conformation. Our finding emphasizes the importance of weak, but attractive, long-range dispersion interactions in protein solution thermodynamics.