Biomolecules (q-bio.BM)

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    Deciphering the links between amino acid sequence and amyloid fibril formation is key for understanding protein misfolding diseases. Here we use Monte Carlo simulations to study aggregation of short peptides in a coarse-grained model with hydrophobic-polar (HP) amino acid sequences and correlated side chain orientations for hydrophobic contacts. A significant heterogeneity is observed in the aggregate structures and in the thermodynamics of aggregation for systems of different HP sequences and different number of peptides. Fibril-like ordered aggregates are found for several sequences that contain the common HPH pattern while other sequences may form helix bundles or disordered aggregates. A wide variation of the aggregation transition temperatures among sequences, even among those of the same hydrophobic fraction, indicates that not all sequences undergo aggregation at a presumable physiological temperature. The transition is found to be the most cooperative and first-order like for sequences forming fibril-like structures. For a fibril-prone sequence, it is shown that fibril formation follows the nucleation and growth mechanism. Interestingly, a binary mixture of peptides of an aggregation-prone and a non-aggregation-prone sequence shows association and conversion of the latter to the fibrillar structure. Our study highlights the role of sequence in selecting fibril-like aggregates and also the impact of structural template on fibril formation by peptides of unrelated sequences.
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    Essentially all biology is active and dynamic. Biological entities autonomously sense, com- pute, and respond using energy-coupled ratchets that can produce force and do work. The cytoskeleton, along with its associated proteins and motors, is a canonical example of biological active matter, which is responsible for cargo transport, cell motility, division, and morphol- ogy. Prior work on cytoskeletal active matter systems showed either extensile or contractile dynamics. Here, we demonstrate a cytoskeletal system that can control the direction of the network dynamics to be either extensile, contractile, or static depending on the concentration of filaments or transient crosslinkers through systematic variation of the crosslinker or micro- tubule concentrations. Based off these new observations and our previously published results, we created a simple one-dimensional model of the interaction of filaments within a bundle. Despite its simplicity, our model recapitulates the observed activities of our experimental sys- tem, implying that the dynamics of our finite networks of bundles are driven by the local filament-filament interactions within the bundle. Finally, we show that contractile phases can result in autonomously motile networks that resemble cells. Our experiments and model allow us to gain a deeper understanding of cytoskeletal dynamics and provide a stepping stone for designing active, autonomous systems that could potentially dynamically switch states.