Quantitative Biology (q-bio)

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    Brains need to predict how our muscles and body react to motor commands. How networks of spiking neurons can learn to reproduce these non-linear dynamics, using local, online and stable learning rules, is an important, open question. Here, we present a supervised learning scheme for the feedforward and recurrent connections in a network of heterogeneous spiking neurons. The error in the output is fed back through fixed random connections with a negative gain, causing the network to follow the desired dynamics, while an online and local rule changes the weights; hence we call the scheme FOLLOW (Feedback-based Online Local Learning Of Weights) The rule is local in the sense that weight changes depend on the presynaptic activity and the error signal projected onto the post-synaptic neuron. We provide examples of learning linear, non-linear and chaotic dynamics, as well as the dynamics of a two-link arm. Using the Lyapunov method, and under reasonable assumptions and approximations, we show that FOLLOW learning is uniformly stable, with the error going to zero asymptotically.
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    The event-based model (EBM) for data-driven disease progression modeling estimates the sequence in which biomarkers for a disease become abnormal. This helps in understanding the dynamics of disease progression and facilitates early diagnosis by staging patients on a disease progression timeline. Existing EBM methods are all generative in nature. In this work we propose a novel discriminative approach to EBM, which is shown to be more accurate as well as computationally more efficient than existing state-of-the art EBM methods. The method first estimates for each subject an approximate ordering of events, by ranking the posterior probabilities of individual biomarkers being abnormal. Subsequently, the central ordering over all subjects is estimated by fitting a generalized Mallows model to these approximate subject-specific orderings based on a novel probabilistic Kendall's Tau distance. To evaluate the accuracy, we performed extensive experiments on synthetic data simulating the progression of Alzheimer's disease. Subsequently, the method was applied to the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) data to estimate the central event ordering in the dataset. The experiments benchmark the accuracy of the new model under various conditions and compare it with existing state-of-the-art EBM methods. The results indicate that discriminative EBM could be a simple and elegant approach to disease progression modeling.
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    Hypothesis generation is becoming a crucial time-saving technique which allows biomedical researchers to quickly discover implicit connections between important concepts. Typically, these systems operate on domain-specific fractions of public medical data. MOLIERE, in contrast, utilizes information from over 24.5 million documents. At the heart of our approach lies a multi-modal and multi-relational network of biomedical objects extracted from several heterogeneous datasets from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). These objects include but are not limited to scientific papers, keywords, genes, proteins, diseases, and diagnoses. We model hypotheses using Latent Dirichlet Allocation applied on abstracts found near shortest paths discovered within this network, and demonstrate the effectiveness of MOLIERE by performing hypothesis generation on historical data. Our network, implementation, and resulting data are all publicly available for the broad scientific community.
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    Boolean matrix factorisation (BooMF) infers interpretable decompositions of a binary data matrix into a pair of low-rank, binary matrices: One containing meaningful patterns, the other quantifying how the observations can be expressed as a combination of these patterns. We introduce the OrMachine, a probabilistic generative model for BooMF and derive a Metropolised Gibbs sampler that facilitates very efficient parallel posterior inference. Our method outperforms all currently existing approaches for Boolean Matrix factorization and completion, as we show on simulated and real world data. This is the first method to provide full posterior inference for BooMF which is relevant in applications, e.g. for controlling false positive rates in collaborative filtering, and crucially it improves the interpretability of the inferred patterns. The proposed algorithm scales to large datasets as we demonstrate by analysing single cell gene expression data in 1.3 million mouse brain cells across 11,000 genes on commodity hardware.
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    Line attractors in neural networks have been suggested to be the basis of many brain functions, such as working memory, oculomotor control, head direction, locomotion, and sensory processing. In recent work, we incorporated pulse gating into feedforward neural networks and showed that the transmission of graded information can be viewed as a line attractor in the firing rate of transiently synchronous populations. While this was revealed in an analysis using rate models, graded information transfer persisted in spiking neural networks and was robust to intrinsic and extrinsic noise. Here, using a Fokker-Planck approach, we show that the gradedness of rate amplitude information transmission in pulse-gated networks is associated with the existence of a cusp catastrophe, and that the slow dynamics near the fold of the cusp underlies the robustness of the line attractor. Understanding the dynamical aspects of this cusp catastrophe allows us to show how line attractors can persist in biologically realistic neuronal networks and how the interplay of pulse gating, synaptic coupling and neuronal stochasticity can be used to enable attracting one-dimensional manifolds and thus, dynamically control graded information processing.
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    Cancer is a disease of cellular regulation, often initiated by genetic mutation within cells, and leading to a heterogeneous cell population within tissues. In the competition for nutrients and growth space within the tumors the phenotype of each cell determines its success. Selection in this process is imposed by both the microenvironment (neighboring cells, extracellular matrix, and diffusing substances), and the whole of the organism through for example the blood supply. In this view, the development of tumor cells is in close interaction with their increasingly changing environment: the more cells can change, the more their environment will change. Furthermore, instabilities are also introduced on the organism level: blood supply can be blocked by increased tissue pressure or the tortuousity of the tumor-neovascular vessels. This coupling between cell, microenvironment, and organism results in behavior that is hard to predict. Here we introduce a cell-based computational model to study the effect of blood flow obstruction on the micro-evolution of cells within a tumorous tissue. We demonstrate that stages of tumor development emerge naturally, without the need for sequential mutation of specific genes. Secondly, we show that instabilities in blood supply can impact the overall development of tumors and lead to the extinction of the dominant aggressive phenotype, showing a clear distinction between the fitness at the cell level and fitness at the population level. This provides new insights into potential side effects of recent tumor vasculature renormalization approaches.
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    We present here a browser-based application for visualizing patterns of connectivity in 3D stacked data matrices with large numbers of pairwise relations. Visualizing a connectivity matrix, looking for trends and patterns, and dynamically manipulating these values is a challenge for scientists from diverse fields, including neuroscience and genomics. In particular, high-dimensional neural data include those acquired via electroencephalography (EEG), electrocorticography (ECoG), magnetoencephalography (MEG), and functional MRI. Neural connectivity data contains multivariate attributes for each edge between different brain regions, which motivated our lightweight, open source, easy-to-use visualization tool for the exploration of these connectivity matrices to highlight connections of interest. Here we present a client-side, mobile-compatible visualization tool written entirely in HTML5/JavaScript that allows in-browser manipulation of user-defined files for exploration of brain connectivity. Visualizations can highlight different aspects of the data simultaneously across different dimensions. Input files are in JSON format, and custom Python scripts have been written to parse MATLAB or Python data files into JSON-loadable format. We demonstrate the analysis of connectivity data acquired via human ECoG recordings as a domain-specific implementation of our application. We envision applications for this interactive tool in fields seeking to visualize pairwise connectivity.
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    Our century has unprecedented new challenges, which need creative solutions and deep thinking. Contemplative, deep thinking became an "endangered species" in our rushing world of Tweets, elevator pitches and fast decisions. Here we describe that important aspects of both creativity and deep thinking can be understood as network phenomena of conceptual and social networks. "Creative nodes" occupy highly dynamic, boundary spanning positions in social networks. Creative thinking requires alternating plasticity-dominated and rigidity-dominated mindsets, which can be helped by dynamically changing social network structures. In the closing section we present three case studies which demonstrate the applications of the concept in the Hungarian research student movement, the Hungarian Templeton Program and the Youth Platform of the European Talent Support Network. These examples show how talent support programs can mobilize the power of social networks to enhance creative, deliberative, deep thinking of talented young minds, influencing social opinion, leading to community action, and developing charismatic leadership skills.
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    Whole genome duplication (WGD) is one of the most important events in the molecular evolution of organisms. In fish species, a WGD is considered to have occurred in the ancestral lineage of teleosts. Recent comprehensive ortholog comparisons among teleost genomes have provided useful data and insights into the fate of redundant genes generated by WGD. Based on these data, a mathematical model is proposed to explain the evolutionary scenario of genes after WGD. The model is parameterized taking into account an equilibrium between i) rapid loss of either of the duplicate genes and ii) moderate functional differentiation of each of duplicate genes, both of which are followed by slow gene loss under purifying selection. This model predicts that, in the teleost lineage, a maximum of about 3000 gene pairs may have differentiated functionally during 90 million years after WGD. Thus, the present study provides a possibility that the whole impact of WGD can be quantitatively assessed according to the model parameters, before details of genomic structural changes or functional differentiation are investigated. If the equilibrium model is valid not only for teleosts but also for other lineages that have undergone WGDs, correlations between the assessment indices and evolutionarily significant events, such as the diversification of species or the occurrence of novel phenotypes, could be tested and compared among those lineages.
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    Identification of intended movement type and movement phase of hand grasp shaping are critical features for the control of volitional neuroprosthetics. We demonstrate that neural dynamics during visually-guided imagined grasp shaping can encode intended movement. We apply Procrustes analysis and LASSO regression to achieve 72% accuracy (chance = 25%) in distinguishing between visually-guided imagined grasp trajectories. Further, we can predict the stage of grasp shaping in the form of elapsed time from start of trial (R2=0.4). Our approach contributes to more accurate single-trial decoding of higher-level movement goals and the phase of grasping movements in individuals not trained with brain-computer interfaces. We also find that the overall time-varying trajectory structure of imagined movements tend to be consistent within individuals, and that transient trajectory deviations within trials return to the task-dependent trajectory mean. These overall findings may contribute to the further understanding of the cortical dynamics of human motor imagery.
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    Zika virus (ZIKV) exhibits unique transmission dynamics in that it is concurrently spread by a mosquito vector and through sexual contact. We show that this sexual component of ZIKV transmission induces novel processes on networks through the highly asymmetric durations of infectiousness between males and females -- it is estimated that males are infectious for periods up to ten times longer than females -- leading to an asymmetric percolation process on the network of sexual contacts. We exactly solve the properties of this asymmetric percolation on random sexual contact networks and show that this process exhibits two epidemic transitions corresponding to a core-periphery structure. This structure is not present in the underlying contact networks, which are not distinguishable from random networks, and emerges \textitbecause of the asymmetric percolation. We provide an exact analytical description of this double transition and discuss the implications of our results in the context of ZIKV epidemics. Most importantly, our study suggests a bias in our current ZIKV surveillance as the community most at risk is also one of the least likely to get tested.
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    Consider the problem of modeling hysteresis for finite-state random walks using higher-order Markov chains. This Letter introduces a Bayesian framework to determine, from data, the number of prior states of recent history upon which a trajectory is statistically dependent. The general recommendation is to use leave-one-out cross validation, using an easily-computable formula that is provided in closed form. Importantly, Bayes factors using flat model priors are biased in favor of too-complex a model (more hysteresis) when a large amount of data is present and the Akaike information criterion (AIC) is biased in favor of too-sparse a model (less hysteresis) when few data are present.
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    This paper investigates cells proliferation dynamics in small tumor cell aggregates using an individual based model (IBM). The simulation model is designed to study the morphology of the cell population and of the cell lineages as well as the impact of the orientation of the division plane on this morphology. Our IBM model is based on the hypothesis that cells are incompressible objects that grow in size and divide once a threshold size is reached, and that newly born cell adhere to the existing cell cluster. We performed comparisons between the simulation model and experimental data by using several statistical indicators. The results suggest that the emergence of particular morphologies can be explained by simple mechanical interactions.
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    We analyse the asymptotic behaviour of integro-differential equations modelling N populations in interaction, where interactions are modelled by non-local terms involving linear combinations of the total number of individuals in each population. This model generalises the usual Lotka-Volterra ordinary differential equations. Our aim is to give conditions under which there is global asymptotical stability of coexistence steady-states at the level of the total number of individuals in each species. Through the analysis of a Lyapunov function, our first main result gives a simple and general condition on the matrix of interactions, together with a convergence rate. The second main result establishes another type of condition in the specific case of mutualistic interactions. These conditions are compared to the well-known condition given by Goh for classical Lotka-Volterra ordinary differential equations.

Recent comments

wiadealo Nov 07 2016 09:27 UTC

Is it [fantasy][1] or real?

[1]: http://buchderfarben.de

climaiw Sep 12 2016 16:19 UTC

I would suggest planets where life can really make a difference.

resodiat Aug 23 2016 13:00 UTC

That is really a long-term perspective.