Quantitative Biology (q-bio)

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    Multicellular chemotaxis can occur via individually chemotaxing cells that are physically coupled. Alternatively, it can emerge collectively, from cells chemotaxing differently in a group than they would individually. We find that while the speeds of these two mechanisms are roughly the same, the precision of emergent chemotaxis is higher than that of individual-based chemotaxis for one-dimensional cell chains and two-dimensional cell sheets, but not three-dimensional cell clusters. We describe the physical origins of these results, discuss their biological implications, and show how they can be tested using common experimental measures such as the chemotactic index.
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    The aim of this work is to quantify the spatio-temporal dynamics of flow-driven amoeboid locomotion in small ($\sim$100 $\mu$m) fragments of the true slime mold \phys \it polycephalum. In this model organism, cellular contraction drives intracellular flows, and these flows transport the chemical signals that regulate contraction in the first place. As a consequence of these non-linear interactions, a diversity of migratory behaviors can be observed in migrating \phys fragments. To study these dynamics, we measure the spatio-temporal distributions of the velocities of the endoplasm and ectoplasm of each migrating fragment, the traction stresses it generates on the substratum, and the concentration of free intracellular calcium. Using these unprecedented experimental data, we classify migrating \phys fragments according to their dynamics, finding that they often exhibit spontaneously coordinated waves of flow, contractility and chemical signaling. We show that \phys fragments exhibiting symmetric spatio-temporal patterns of endoplasmic flow migrate significantly slower than fragments with asymmetric patterns. In addition, our joint measurements of ectoplasm velocity and traction stress at the substratum suggest that forward motion of the ectoplasm is enabled by a succession of stick-slip transitions, which we conjecture are also organized in the form of waves. Combining our experiments with a simplified convection-diffusion model, we show that the convective transport of calcium ions may be key for establishing and maintaining the spatio-temporal patterns of calcium concentration that regulate the generation of contractile forces.
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    Hair cells, the sensory receptors of the internal ear, subserve different functions in various receptor organs: they detect oscillatory stimuli in the auditory system, but transduce constant and step stimuli in the vestibular and lateral-line systems. We show that a hair cell's function can be controlled experimentally by adjusting its mechanical load. By making bundles from a single organ operate as any of four distinct types of signal detector, we demonstrate that altering only a few key parameters can fundamentally change a sensory cell's role. The motions of a single hair bundle can resemble those of a bundle from the amphibian vestibular system, the reptilian auditory system, or the mammalian auditory system, demonstrating an essential similarity of bundles across species and receptor organs.
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    An SEIRS epidemic with disease fatalities is introduced in a growing population (modelled as a super-critical linear birth and death process). The study of the initial phase of the epidemic is stochastic, while the analysis of the major outbreaks is deterministic. Depending on the values of the parameters, the following scenarios are possible. i) The disease dies out quickly, only infecting few; ii) the epidemic takes off, the \textitnumber of infected individuals grows exponentially, but the \textitfraction of infected individuals remains negligible; iii) the epidemic takes off, the \textitnumber of infected grows initially quicker than the population, the disease fatalities diminish the growth rate of the population, but it remains super critical, and the \emphfraction of infected go to an endemic equilibrium; iv) the epidemic takes off, the \textitnumber of infected individuals grows initially quicker than the population, the diseases fatalities turn the exponential growth of the population to an exponential decay.
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    Human populations have a complex history of introgression and of changing population size. Human genetic variation has been affected by both these processes, so that inference of past population size depends upon the pattern of gene flow and introgression among past populations. One remarkable aspect of human population history as inferred from genetics is a consistent "wave" of larger effective population size, prior to the bottlenecks and expansions of the last 100,000 years. Here I carry out a series of simulations to investigate how introgression and gene flow from genetically divergent ancestral populations affect the inference of ancestral effective population size. Both introgression and gene flow from an extinct, genetically divergent population consistently produce a wave in the history of inferred effective population size. The time and amplitude of the wave reflect the time of origin of the genetically divergent ancestral populations and the strength of introgression or gene flow. These results demonstrate that even small fractions of introgression or gene flow from ancient populations may have large effects on the inference of effective population size.
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    Beta oscillations observed in motor cortical local field potentials (LFPs) recorded on separate electrodes of a multi-electrode array have been shown to exhibit non-zero phase shifts that organize into a planar wave propagation. Here, we generalize this concept by introducing additional classes of patterns that fully describe the spatial organization of beta oscillations. During a delayed reach-to-grasp task in monkey primary motor and dorsal premotor cortices we distinguish planar, synchronized, random, circular, and radial phase patterns. We observe that specific patterns correlate with the beta amplitude (envelope). In particular, wave propagation accelerates with growing amplitude, and culminates at maximum amplitude in a synchronized pattern. Furthermore, the occurrence probability of a particular pattern is modulated with behavioral epochs: Planar waves and synchronized patterns are more present during movement preparation where beta amplitudes are large, whereas random phase patterns are dominant during movement execution where beta amplitudes are small.
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    The brain processes visual inputs having structure over a large range of spatial scales. The precise mechanisms or algorithms used by the brain to achieve this feat are largely unknown and an open problem in visual neuroscience. In particular, the spatial extent in visual space over which primary visual cortex (V1) performs evidence integration has been shown to change as a function of contrast and other visual parameters, thus adapting scale in visual space in an input-dependent manner. We demonstrate that a simple dynamical mechanism---dynamical criticality---can simultaneously account for the well-documented input-dependence characteristics of three properties of V1: scales of integration in visuotopic space, extents of lateral integration on the cortical surface, and response latencies.

Recent comments

wiadealo Nov 07 2016 09:27 UTC

Is it [fantasy][1] or real?

[1]: http://buchderfarben.de

climaiw Sep 12 2016 16:19 UTC

I would suggest planets where life can really make a difference.

resodiat Aug 23 2016 13:00 UTC

That is really a long-term perspective.