Physics and Society (physics.soc-ph)

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    This study focuses on investigating the manner in which a prompt quarantine measure suppresses epidemics in networks. A simple and ideal quarantine measure is considered in which an individual is detected with a probability immediately after it becomes infected and the detected one and its neighbors are promptly isolated. The efficiency of this quarantine in suppressing a susceptible-infected-removed (SIR) model is tested in random graphs and uncorrelated scale-free networks. Monte Carlo simulations are used to show that the prompt quarantine measure outperforms random and acquaintance preventive vaccination schemes in terms of reducing the number of infected individuals. The epidemic threshold for the SIR model is analytically derived under the quarantine measure, and the theoretical findings indicate that prompt executions of quarantines are highly effective in containing epidemics. Even if infected individuals are detected with a very low probability, the SIR model under a prompt quarantine measure has finite epidemic thresholds in fat-tailed scale-free networks in which an infected individual can always cause an outbreak of a finite relative size without any measure. The numerical simulations also demonstrate that the present quarantine measure is effective in suppressing epidemics in real networks.
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    Moving bottlenecks, such as slow-driving vehicles, are commonly thought of as impediments to efficient traffic flow. Here, we demonstrate that in certain situations, moving bottlenecks---properly controlled---can actually be beneficial for the traffic flow, in that they reduce the overall fuel consumption, without imposing any delays on the other vehicles. As an important practical example, we study a fixed bottleneck (e.g., an accident) that has occurred further downstream. This new possibility of traffic control is particularly attractive with autonomous vehicles, which (a) will have fast access to non-local information, such as incidents and congestion downstream; and (b) can execute driving protocols accurately.
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    In this paper, we propose a novel generic model of opinion dynamics over a social network, in the presence of communication among the users leading to interpersonal influence i.e., peer pressure. Each individual in the social network has a distinct objective function representing a weighted sum of internal and external pressures. We prove conditions under which a connected group of users converges to a fixed opinion distribution, and under which conditions the group reaches consensus. Through simulation, we study the rate of convergence on large scale-free networks as well as the impact of user stubbornness on convergence in a simple political model.
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    Global and partial synchronization are the two distinctive forms of synchronization in coupled oscillators and have been well studied in the past decades. Recent attention on synchronization is focused on the chimera state (CS) and explosive synchronization (ES), but little attention has been paid to their relationship. We here study this topic by presenting a model to bridge these two phenomena, which consists of two groups of coupled oscillators and its coupling strength is adaptively controlled by a local order parameter. We find that this model displays either CS or ES in two limits. In between the two limits, this model exhibits both CS and ES, where CS can be observed for a fixed coupling strength and ES appears when the coupling is increased adiabatically. Moreover, we show both theoretically and numerically that there are a variety of CS basin patterns for the case of identical oscillators, depending on the distributions of both the initial order parameters and the initial average phases. This model suggests a way to easily observe CS, in contrast to others models having some (weak or strong) dependence on initial conditions.
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    Influencing various aspects of human activity, migration is associated also with language formation. To examine the mutual interaction of these processes, we study a Naming Game with migrating agents. The dynamics of the model leads to formation of low-mobility clusters, which turns out to break the symmetry of the Naming Game by favouring low-mobility languages. High-mobility languages are gradually eliminated from the system and the dynamics of language formation considerably slows down.
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    To help with the planning of inter-vehicular communication networks, an accurate understanding of traffic behavior and traffic phase transition is required. We calculate inter-vehicle spacings from empirical data collected in a multi-lane highway in California, USA. We calculate the correlation coefficients for spacings between vehicles in individual lanes to show that the flows are independent. We determine the first four moments for individual lanes at regular time intervals, namely the mean, variance, skewness and kurtosis. We follow the evolution of these moments as the traffic condition changes from the low-density free flow to high-density congestion. We find that the higher moments of inter-vehicle spacings have a well defined dependence on the mean value. The variance of the spacing distribution monotonously increases with the mean vehicle spacing. In contrast, our analysis suggests that the skewness and kurtosis provide one of the most sensitive probes towards the search for the critical points. We find two significant results. First, the kurtosis calculated in different time intervals for different lanes varies smoothly with the skewness. They share the same behavior with the skewness and kurtosis calculated for probability density functions that depend on a single parameter. Second, the skewness and kurtosis as functions of the mean intervehicle spacing show sharp peaks at critical densities expected for transitions between different traffic phases. The data show a considerable scatter near the peak positions, which suggests that the critical behavior may depend on other parameters in addition to the traffic density.
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    Group discussions are a way for individuals to exchange ideas and arguments in order to reach better decisions than they could on their own. One of the premises of productive discussions is that better solutions will prevail, and that the idea selection process is mediated by the (relative) competence of the individuals involved. However, since people may not know their actual competence on a new task, their behavior is influenced by their self-estimated competence --- that is, their confidence --- which can be misaligned with their actual competence. Our goal in this work is to understand the effects of confidence-competence misalignment on the dynamics and outcomes of discussions. To this end, we design a large-scale natural setting, in the form of an online team-based geography game, that allows us to disentangle confidence from competence and thus separate their effects. We find that in task-oriented discussions, the more-confident individuals have a larger impact on the group's decisions even when these individuals are at the same level of competence as their teammates. Furthermore, this unjustified role of confidence in the decision-making process often leads teams to under-perform. We explore this phenomenon by investigating the effects of confidence on conversational dynamics.
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    In this article, we discuss a dynamical stochastic model that represents the time evolution of income distribution of a population, where the dynamics develop from an interplay of multiple economic exchanges in the presence of multiplicative noise. The model remit stretches beyond the conventional framework of a Langevin-type kinetic equation in that our model dynamics is self-consistently constrained by dynamical conservation laws emerging from population and wealth conservation. This model is numerically solved and analyzed to interpret the inequality of income as a function of relevant dynamical parameters like the \it mobility $M$ and the \it total income $\mu$. In our model, inequality is quantified by the \it Gini index $G$. In particular, correlations between any two of the mobility index $M$ and/or the total income $\mu$ with the Gini index $G$ are investigated and compared with the analogous correlations resulting from an equivalent additive noise model. Our findings highlight the importance of a multiplicative noise based economic modeling structure in the analysis of inequality. The model also depicts the nature of correlation between mobility and total income of a population from the perspective of inequality measure.

Recent comments

Piotr Migdał Jun 07 2014 09:08 UTC

[Carl Linnaeus](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Linnaeus) appears to benefit a lot from this particular algorithm (and perhaps any other taking all links with the same value). Just look at [inbound links](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special:WhatLinksHere/Carl_Linnaeus) - vast majority of them ref

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Jaiden Mispy May 31 2014 08:12 UTC

It'd be interesting to see if the results change at all by targeting groups based around subjects other than software development. I'd expect developers to have non-representative knowledge of and interactions with bots.

Piotr Migdał Apr 18 2014 18:43 UTC

A podcast summarizing this paper, by Geoff Engelstein: [The Dice Tower # 351 - Dealing with the Mockers (43:55 - 50:36)](http://dicetower.coolstuffinc.com/tdt-351-dealing-with-the-mockers), and [an alternative link on the BoardGameGeek](http://boardgamegeek.com/boardgamepodcastepisode/117163/tdt-351

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Aram Harrow Mar 19 2013 02:59 UTC

The original quantum Pagerank paper used adiabatic evolution, and this one uses the Szegedy walk. I wonder how the methods compare.

Another thing I'd like someone to figure out at some point is whether these can be done using resources scaling like poly log(# vertices) for power law graphs. T

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