Physics and Society (physics.soc-ph)

  • PDF
    The way the topological structure goes from a decoupled state into a coupled one in multiplex networks has been widely studied by means of analytical and numerical studies, involving models of artificial networks. In general, these experiments assume uniform interconnections between layers offering, on the one hand, an analytical treatment of the structural properties of multiplex networks but, on the other hand, loosing applicability to real networks where heterogeneity of the links' weights is an intrinsic feature. In this paper, we study 2-layer multiplex networks of musicians whose layers correspond to empirical datasets containing, and linking the information of: (i) collaboration between them and (ii) musical similarities. In our model, connections between the collaboration and similarity layers exist, but they are not ubiquitous for all nodes. Specifically, inter-layer links are created (and weighted) based on structural resemblances between the neighborhood of an artist, taking into account the level of interaction at each layer. Next, we evaluate the effect that the heterogeneity of the weights of the inter-layer links has on the structural properties of the whole network, namely the second smallest eigenvalue of the Laplacian matrix (algebraic connectivity). Our results show a transition in the value of the algebraic connectivity that is far from classical theoretical predictions where the weight of the inter-layer links is considered to be homogeneous.
  • PDF
    Machine learning and AI-assisted trading have attracted growing interest for the past few years. Here, we use this approach to test the hypothesis that the inefficiency of the cryptocurrency market can be exploited to generate abnormal profits. We analyse daily data for $1,681$ cryptocurrencies for the period between Nov. 2015 and Apr. 2018. We show that simple trading strategies assisted by state-of-the-art machine learning algorithms outperform standard benchmarks. Our results show that non-trivial, but ultimately simple, algorithmic mechanisms can help anticipate the short-term evolution of the cryptocurrency market.
  • PDF
    The possibility of using mathematics to model church growth is investigated using ideas from population modeling. It is proposed that a major mechanism of growth is through contact between religious enthusiasts and unbelievers, where the enthusiasts are only enthusiastic for a limited period. After that period they remain church members but less effective in recruitment. This leads to the general epidemic model which is applied to a variety of church growth situations. Results show that even a simple model like this can help understand the way in which churches grow, particularly in times of religious revival. This is a revised version of Hayward (1999) using System Dynamics and some small modifications to the SIR model.
  • PDF
    Typing Yesterday into the search-bar of your browser provides a long list of websites with, in top places, a link to a video by The Beatles. The order your browser shows its search results is a notable example of the use of network centrality. Centrality is a measure of the importance of the nodes in a network and it plays a crucial role in a huge number of fields, ranging from sociology to engineering, and from biology to economics. Many metrics are available to evaluate centrality. However, centrality measures are generally based on ad hoc assumptions, and there is no commonly accepted way to compare the effectiveness and reliability of different metrics. Here we propose a new perspective where centrality definition arises naturally from the most basic feature of a network, its adjacency matrix. Following this perspective, different centrality measures naturally emerge, including the degree, eigenvector, and hub-authority centrality. Within this theoretical framework, the accuracy of different metrics can be compared. Tests on a large set of networks show that the standard centrality metrics perform unsatisfactorily, highlighting intrinsic limitations of these metrics for describing the centrality of nodes in complex networks. More informative multi-component centrality metrics are proposed as the natural extension of standard metrics.
  • PDF
    Previous experiments have explored the effect of gender and cognitive reflection on dishonesty. However, to the best of our knowledge, no studies have investigated potential interactions between these two factors. Here we report a large online experiment (N = 766) where subjects first have a chance to lie for their benefit and then take a Cognitive Reflection Test (CRT). We find a significant interaction between gender and CRT score such that lack of deliberation promotes honesty for men but not for women. Additional analyses highlight that this effect is not driven by intuitive men but, at least partly, by men whose answers are neither intuitive nor deliberative, who happen to be particularly honest in our deception game.
  • PDF
    In this work, we investigate the effect of social media on the process of opinion formation in a human population. This effect is modeled as an external field in the dynamics of the two-dimensional Sznajd model with a probability P for an agent to follow the social media. We investigate the evolution of magnetization, the distribution of decision time and the average relaxation time in the presence of the external field. Our results suggest that the average relaxation time on the lattice of size L follows a power law, where the exponent depends on the probability P. We also show that phase transition between two distinct states of the system decreases for any initial distribution of the opinions as the probability P is increasing. For a critical point of P ~ 0.18, no phase transition is observed and the system evolves to a dictatorship regardless of the initial distribution of the opinions in the population.
  • PDF
    We propose a simple formula for estimating national seat shares in multidistrict elections employing the Jefferson-D'Hondt method for seat allocation solely on the basis of the national vote shares and fixed parameters of the electoral system. The proposed formula clarifies the relationship between seat bias and both the number of parties and the number of districts. We discuss how our formula differs from the simple generalization of the single-district asymptotic seat bias formulae and what assumptions must hold for our method to give exact results. We further demonstrate that despite minor violations of those assumptions, the formula provides a good estimate of actual seat allocations for all EU countries that have a national party system and employ the Jefferson-D'Hondt seat allocation method in parliamentary elections, i.e., Croatia, the Czech Republic, Finland, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, and Spain. Finally, we present a number of applications of the formula for the evaluation of political strategies.
  • PDF
    Dynamic community detection provides a coherent description of network clusters over time, allowing one to track the growth and death of communities as the network evolves. However, modularity maximization, a popular method for performing multilayer community detection, requires the specification of an appropriate null model as well as resolution and interlayer coupling parameters. Importantly, the ability of the algorithm to accurately detect community evolution is dependent on the choice of these parameters. In functional temporal networks, where evolving communities reflect changing functional relationships between network nodes, it is especially important that the detected communities reflect any state changes of the system. Here, we present analytical work suggesting that a uniform null model provides improved sensitivity to the detection of small evolving communities in temporal correlation networks. We then propose a method for increasing the sensitivity of modularity maximization to state changes in nodal dynamics by modeling self-identity links between layers based on the self-similarity of the network nodes between layers. This method is more appropriate for functional temporal networks from both a modeling and mathematical perspective, as it incorporates the dynamic nature of network nodes. We motivate our method based on applications in neuroscience where network nodes represent neurons and functional edges represent similarity of firing patterns in time. Finally, we show that in simulated data sets of neuronal spike trains, updating interlayer links based on the firing properties of the neurons provides superior community detection of evolving network structure when group of neurons change their firing properties over time.

Recent comments

Noon van der Silk May 23 2017 11:15 UTC

I think this thread has reached it's end.

I've locked further comments, and I hope that the quantum computing community can thoughtfully find an approach to language that is inclusive to all and recognises the diverse background of all researchers, current and future.

I direct your attention t

...(continued)
Varun Narasimhachar May 23 2017 02:14 UTC

While I would never want to antagonize my peers or to allow myself to assume they were acting irrationally, I do share your concerns to an extent. I worry about the association of social justice and inclusivity with linguistic engineering, virtual lynching, censorship, etc. (the latter phenomena sta

...(continued)
Aram Harrow May 23 2017 01:30 UTC

I think you are just complaining about issues that arise from living with other people in the same society. If you disagree with their values, well, then some of them might have a negative opinion about you. If you express yourself in an aggressive way, and use words like "lynch" to mean having pe

...(continued)
Steve Flammia May 23 2017 01:04 UTC

I agree with Noon that the discussion is becoming largely off topic for SciRate, but that it might still be of interest to the community to discuss this. I invite people to post thoughtful and respectful comments over at [my earlier Quantum Pontiff post][1]. Further comments here on SciRate will be

...(continued)
Noon van der Silk May 23 2017 00:59 UTC

I've moderated a few comments on this post because I believe it has gone past useful discussion, and I'll continue to remove comments that I believe don't add anything of substantial value.

Thanks.

Aram Harrow May 22 2017 23:13 UTC

The problem with your argument is that no one is forcing anyone to say anything, or banning anything.

If the terms really were offensive or exclusionary or had other bad side effects, then it's reasonable to discuss as a community whether to keep them, and possibly decide to stop using them. Ther

...(continued)
stan May 22 2017 22:53 UTC

Fair enough. At the end of the day I think most of us are concerned with the strength of the result not the particular language used to describe it.

VeteranVandal May 22 2017 22:41 UTC

But how obvious is ancilla? To me it is not even remotely obvious (nor clear as a term, but as the literature used it so much, I see such word in much the same way as I see auxiliary, in fact - now if you want to take offense with auxiliary, what can I say? I won't invent words just to please you).

...(continued)
VeteranVandal May 22 2017 22:21 UTC

I don't think science can or should avoid the perpetuation of existing "historical unequal social order" by changing the language, as to me it seems that, if you try hard enough you can find problem with anything you want to be offended at - rationalizations are tricky things you can often get carri

...(continued)
Fernando Brandao May 22 2017 21:37 UTC

I am not sure if the ArXiv is the best venue for this kind of paper/rant. Also, I’m concerned that so much energy is being put into the discussion. As a non-native speaker, I might not get all nuances of the language, but I have a hard time understanding why we should drop a scientific jargon like “

...(continued)