Plasma Physics (physics.plasm-ph)

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    Gyrokinetic theory is a basis for treating magnetised plasma dynamics slower than particle gyrofrequencies where the scale of the background is larger than relevant gyroradii. The energy of field perturbations can be comparable to the thermal energy but smaller than the energy of the background magnetic field. Properly applied, it is a low-frequency gauge transform rather than a treatment of particle orbits, and more a representation in terms of gyrocenters rather than particles than an approximation. By making all transformations and approximations in the field/particle Lagrangian one preserves exact energetic consistency so that time symmetry ensures energy conservation and spatial axisymmetry ensures toroidal angular momentum conservation. This method draws on earlier experience with drift kinetic models while showing the independence of gyrokinetic representation from particularities of Lie transforms or specific ordering limits, and that the essentials of low-frequency magnetohydrodynamics, including the equilibrium, are recovered. It gives a useful basis for total-f electromagnetic gyrokinetic computation. Various versions of the representation based upon choice of parallel velocity space coordinate are illustrated.
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    Low-frequency turbulence in magnetised plasmas is intrisically influenced by gyroscale effects across ion Larmor orbits. Here we show that fundamental vortex interactions like merging and co-advection in gyrofluid plasmas are essentially modified under the influence of gyroinduced vortex spiraling. For identical initial vorticity, the fate of co-rotating eddies is decided between accelerated merging or explosion by the asymmetry of initial density distributions. Structures in warm gyrofluid turbulence are characterised by gyrospinning enhanced filamentation into thin vorticity sheets.
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    Magnetorotational instability (MRI) is one of the fundamental processes in astrophysics, driving angular momentum transport and mass accretion in a wide variety of cosmic objects. Despite much theoretical/numerical and experimental efforts over the last decades, its saturation mechanism and amplitude, which sets the angular momentum transport rate, remains not well understood, especially in the limit of high resistivity, or small magnetic Prandtl numbers typical to interiors of protoplanetary disks, liquid cores of planets and liquid metals in laboratory. We investigate the nonlinear development and saturation properties of the helical magnetorotational instability (HMRI) in a magnetized Taylor-Couette flow using direct numerical simulations. From the linear theory of HMRI, it is known that the Elsasser number, or interaction parameter plays a special role for its dynamics and determines its growth rate. We show that this parameter is also important in the nonlinear problem. By increasing its value, a sudden transition from weakly nonlinear, where the system is slightly above the linear stability threshold, to turbulent regime occurs. We calculate the azimuthal and axial energy spectra corresponding to these two regimes and show that they differ qualitatively. Remarkably, the nonlinear states remain in all cases nearly axisymmetric suggesting that HMRI turbulence is quasi two-dimensional in nature. Although the contribution of non-axisymmetric modes increases moderately with the Elsasser number, their total energy remains much smaller than that of the axisymmetric ones.
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    We construct a five-mode helical dynamo model containing three velocity and two magnetic modes and solve it analytically. This model exhibits dynamo transition via supercritical pitchfork bifurcation. We show that the critical magnetic Reynolds number for dynamo transition ($\mathrm{Rm}_c$) asymptotes to constant values for very low and very high magnetic Prandtl numbers ($\mathrm{Pm}$). Beyond dynamo transition, secondary bifurcations lead to periodic, quasi-periodic, and chaotic dynamo states as the forcing amplitude is increased and chaos appears through a quasi-periodic route.
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    It is typically assumed that the kinetic and magnetic helicities play a crucial role in the growth of large-scale dynamo. In this paper we demonstrate that helicity is not essential for the amplification of large-scale magnetic field. For this purpose, we perform nonhelical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation, and show that the large-scale magnetic field can grow in nonhelical MHD when random external forcing is employed at scale $1/10$ the box size. The energy fluxes and shell-to-shell transfer rates computed using the numerical data show that the large-scale magnetic energy grows due to the energy transfers from the velocity field at the forcing scales.
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    Boron carbide (B4C) is one of the few materials that is expected to be mostly resilient with respect to the extremely high brilliance of the photon beam generated by free electron lasers (FELs) and is thus of considerable interest for optical applications in this field. However, as in the case of many other optics operated at modern light source facilities, B4C-coated optics are subject to ubiquitous carbon contaminations. These contaminations represent a serious issue for the operation of high performance FEL beamlines due to severe reduction of photon flux, beam coherence, creation of destructive interference, and scattering losses. A variety of B4C cleaning technologies were developed at different laboratories with varying success. We present a study regarding the low-pressure RF plasma cleaning of carbon contaminated B4C test samples via inductively coupled O2/Ar, H2/Ar, and pure O2 RF plasma produced following previous studies using the same IBSS GV10x downstream plasma source. Results regarding the chemistry, morphology as well as other aspects of the B4C optical coating before and after the plasma cleaning are reported. We conclude from these comparative plasma processes that pure O2 feedstock plasma only exhibits the required chemical selectivity for maintaining the integrity of the B4C optical coating.
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    The ubiquity of high energy tails in the charged particle velocity distribution functions observed in space plasmas suggests the existence of an underlying process responsible for taking a fraction of the charged particle population out of thermal equilibrium and accelerating them to suprathermal velocities. The present Letter focuses on a new mechanism that generates suprathermal electron distribution function. The said mechanism involves a newly discovered electrostatic bremsstrahlung emission that modifies the Langmuir fluctuation spectrum, which in turn distorts the Maxwellian distribution into the suprathermal distribution function. The weak turbulence equations that incorporate collisional effects on the wave dynamics are numerically analyzed in order to demonstrate this process. It is shown that after a long integration period a quasi-steady state is attained in which the electron velocity distribution highly resembles the core-halo velocity distribution associated with the solar wind observations. Such a process may be operative at the coronal source region, which is characterized by high collisionality.
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    We report the first measurements of equations of state of a fully relaxed magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) laboratory plasma. Parcels of magnetized plasma, called Taylor states, are formed in a coaxial magnetized plasma gun, and are allowed to relax and drift into a closed flux conserving volume. Density, ion temperature, and magnetic field are measured as a function of time as the Taylor states compress and heat. The theoretically predicted MHD and double adiabatic equations of state are compared to experimental measurements. We find that the MHD equation of state is inconsistent with our data.