Plasma Physics (physics.plasm-ph)

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    Low-collisionality stellarator plasmas usually display a large negative radial electric field that has been expected to cause accumulation of impurities due to their high charge number. In this paper, two combined effects that can potentially modify this scenario are discussed. First, it is shown that, in low collisionality plasmas, the kinetic contribution of the electrons to the radial electric field can make it negative but small, bringing the plasma close to impurity temperature screening (i.e., to a situation in which the ion temperature gradient is the main drive of impurity transport and causes outward flux); in plasmas of very low collisionality, such as those of the Large Helical Device displaying impurity hole, screening may actually occur. Second, the component of the electric field that is tangent to the flux surface (in other words, the variation of the electrostatic potential on the flux surface), although smaller than the radial component, has recently been suggested to be an additional relevant drive for radial impurity transport. Here, it is explained that, especially when the radial electric field is small, the tangential magnetic drift has to be kept in order to correctly compute the tangential electric field, that can be larger than previously expected. This can have a strong impact on impurity transport, as we illustrate by means of simulations using the newly-developed code KNOSOS (KiNetic Orbit-averaging-SOlver for Stellarators).
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    Plasma turbulence, and edge density fluctuations in particular, can under certain conditions broaden the cross-section of injected microwave beams significantly. This can be a severe problem for applications relying on well-localized deposition of the microwave power, like the control of MHD instabilities. Here we investigate this broadening mechanism as a function of fluctuation level, background density and propagation length in a fusion-relevant scenario using two numerical codes, the full-wave code IPF-FDMC and the novel wave kinetic equation solver WKBeam. The latter treats the effects of fluctuations using a statistical approach, based on an iterative solution of the scattering problem (Born approximation). The full-wave simulations are used to benchmark this approach. The Born approximation is shown to be valid over a large parameter range, including ITER-relevant scenarios.
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    The time varying currents in the Ohmic transformer in the SST-1 tokamak induce voltages that drive large eddy currents in the passive structures like the vacuum vessel and cryostat. Since the vacuum vessel and the cryostat are toroidally continuous without electrical breaks in SST- 1, this leads to a shielding effect on the flux penetrating the vacuum vessel. This reduces the magnitude of the loop voltage seen by the plasma as also delays its buildup. Also the induced currents alter the null location of magnetic field. This will have serious implications on the plasma breakdown and startup and corrective measures may be required in case of an insufficient loop voltage or an improper null. Further, the eddy currents distribution will be vital for the plasma equilibrium and need to be considered while reconstructing the equilibrium. Evolution of the toroidal eddy currents in SST-1 passive structures has been studied using a toroidal-filament model. The model calculations are compared with the measured signals in the magnetic diagnostics like the toroidal flux loops and magnetic pick-up coils installed on the SST-1.
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    Results are reported of an experiment performed at the Eclipse laser facility in CELIA, Bordeaux, on the generation of strong electromagnetic pulses. Measurements were performed of the target neutralization current, the total target charge and the tangential component of the magnetic field for the laser energies ranging from 45 mJ to 92 mJ with the pulse duration approximately 40 fs, and for the pulse durations ranging from 39 fs to 1000 fs, with the laser energy approximately 90 mJ. It was found that the values obtained for thick (mm scale) Cu targets are visibly higher than values reported in previous experiments, which is argued to be a manifestation of a strong dependence of the target electric polarization process on the laser contrast and hence on the amount of preplasma. It was also found that values obtained for thin (micrometer scale) Al foils were visibly higher than values for thick Cu targets, especially for pulse durations longer than 100 fs. The correlations between the total target charge versus the maximum value of the target neutralization current, and the maximum value of the tangential component of the magnetic field versus the total target charge were analysed. They were found to be in very good agreement with correlations seen in data from previous experiments, which provides a good consistency check on our experimental procedures.
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    Turbulence driven by small scale instabilities causes large heat and particle transport and is a major limiting factor of current fusion devices. Above a critical value, the ion temperature gradient leads to the growth of a microinstability -- the ion temperature gradient mode -- that often dominates the ion energy transport. It has recently been discovered that energetic ions generated by auxiliary heating may reduce the growth of this instability. By applying the gyrokinetic formalism and performing linear simulations using the local continuum gyrokinetic code GS2, we explore the linear physics of this stabilising effect. In order to isolate important effects due to the presence of fast ions, we make use of the flexibility of GS2 to change the plasma and magnetic geometry parameters independently. We assess the possibility to neglect magnetic geometry changes to simplify the analysis, by investigating its contribution to the stabilising effect. For the cases studied we find that the Shafranov shift and safety factor profile might have to be taken into account. For fixed fast ion density and temperature a destabilising influence of their density gradient is found, while the high fast ion temperature gradient is stabilising, both as predicted by theoretical models. A large part of the observed stabilisation comes from the fast ion contribution to the plasma $\beta$. In addition, the effect of $\beta$ is enhanced because of the large density and temperature gradients of the fast ions. We investigate the role of hot ion mass and charge in order to evaluate the stabilisation of different types of hot ions. Also the possibility of adjusting the electron and ion profiles to account for the presence of fast ions without including them as a kinetic species, is considered. Finally, quasi-linear theory is invoked for linking linear results to saturated values of the nonlinear heat fluxes.
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    Recent X-ray observations of merger shocks in galaxy clusters have shown that the post-shock plasma is two-temperature, with the protons being hotter than the electrons. In this work, the second of a series, we investigate by means of two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations the efficiency of electron irreversible heating in perpendicular low Mach number shocks. We consider values of plasma beta (ratio of thermal and magnetic pressures) in the range $4\lesssim \beta_{p0}\lesssim 32$ and sonic Mach number (ratio of shock speed to pre-shock sound speed) in the range $2\lesssim M_{s}\lesssim 5$, as appropriate for galaxy cluster shocks. As shown in Paper I, magnetic field amplification - induced by shock compression of the pre-shock field, or by strong proton cyclotron and mirror modes accompanying the relaxation of proton temperature anisotropy - can drive the electron temperature anisotropy beyond the threshold of the electron whistler instability. The growth of whistler waves breaks the electron adiabatic invariance, and allows for efficient entropy production. We find that the post-shock electron temperature $T_{e2}$ exceeds the adiabatic expectation $T_{e2,\rm ad}$ by an amount $(T_{e2}-T_{e2,\rm ad})/T_{e0}\simeq 0.044 \,M_s (M_s-1)$ (here, $T_{e0}$ is the pre-shock temperature), which depends only weakly on the plasma beta, over the range $4\lesssim \beta_{p0}\lesssim 32$ which we have explored, and on the proton-to-electron mass ratio (the coefficient of $\simeq 0.044$ is measured for our fiducial $m_i/m_e=49$, and we estimate that it will decrease to $\simeq 0.03$ for the realistic mass ratio). Our results have important implications for current and future observations of galaxy cluster shocks in the radio band (synchrotron emission and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect) and at X-ray frequencies.