Optics (physics.optics)

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    We show that radiative decay in dielectric nanocomposite is greatly affected by the shape and arrangement of its constituents. For the same fractions of constituting materials the radiative decay rate can differ by orders of magnitude. E.g. for the case of diluted luminescent nanoparticles with refractive index of 1.43 inside a host with refractive index of 3.5 we show that one can achieve broadband Purcell factors of up to 40, which is of the same order as what can be achieved for a single frequency with deliberately patterned high Q dielectric resonators. Further, we discuss the fact that the Purcell factor is a spatially inhomogenous quantity and we present a simple way to calculate the average Purcell factor in arbitrary nanocomposites based on the reciprocity theorem and a quasistatic approximation. It is shown that in dielectric nanocomposites a low index luminescent medium should occupy gaps between high index particles to achieve maximal Purcell enhancement.
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    Natural light harvesting systems exploit electronic coupling of identical chromophores to generate efficient and robust excitation transfer and conversion. Dark states created by strong coupling between chromophores in the antenna structure can significantly reduce radiative recombination and enhance energy conversion efficiency. Increasing the number of the chromophores increases the number of dark states and the associated enhanced energy conversion efficiency, yet also delocalizes excitations away from the trapping center and reduces the energy conversion rate. Therefore, a competition between dark state protection and delocalization must be considered when designing the optimal size of a light harvesting system. In this study, we explore the two competing mechanisms in a chain-structured antenna and show that dark state protection is the dominant mechanism, with an intriguing dependence on the parity of the number of chromophores. This dependence is linked to the exciton distribution among eigenstates which is strongly affected by the coupling strength between chromophores and the temperature. Combining these findings, we propose that increasing the coupling strength between the chromophores can significantly increase the power output of the light harvesting system.
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    The formal link between magnitudes per square arcsecond and luminance is discussed in this paper. Directly related to the human visual system, luminance is defined in terms of the spectral radiance of the source, weighted by the CIE V($\lambda$) luminous efficiency function, and scaled by the 683 lm/W luminous efficacy constant. In consequence, any exact and spectrum-independent relationship between luminance and magnitudes per square arcsecond requires that the latter be measured precisely in the CIE V($\lambda$) band. The luminance value corresponding to m_VC=0 (zero-point of the CIE V($\lambda$) magnitude scale) depends on the reference source chosen for the definition of the magnitude system. Using absolute AB magnitudes, the zero-point luminance of the CIE V($\lambda$) photometric band is 10.96 x 10^4 cd/m^2.
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    Temporal modes (TM) are a new basis for storage and retrieval of quantum information in states of light. The full TM manipulation toolkit requires a practical quantum pulse gate (QPG), which is a device that unitarily maps any given TM component of the optical input field onto a different, easily separable subspace or degree of freedom. An ideal QPG must "separate" the selected TM component with unit efficiency, whilst avoiding crosstalk from orthogonal TMs. All attempts at implementing QPGs in pulsed-pump traveling-wave systems have been unable to satisfy both conditions simultaneously. This is due to a known selectivity limit in processes that rely on spatio-temporally local, nonlinear interactions between pulsed modes traveling at independent group velocities. This limit is a consequence of time ordering in the quantum dynamical evolution, which is predicted to be overcome by coherently cascading multiple stages of low-efficiency, but highly TM-discriminatory QPGs. Multi-stage interferometric quantum frequency conversion in nonlinear waveguides was first proposed for precisely this purpose. TM-nonselective cascaded frequency conversion, also called optical Ramsey interferometry, has recently been demonstrated with continuous-wave (CW) fields. Here, we present the first experimental demonstration of TM-selective optical Ramsey interferometry and show a significant enhancement in TM selectivity over single-stage schemes.
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    Classical and quantum optical devices rely on the powerful light trapping and transporting architectures offered by nanophotonic systems. These properties derive from the way the optical modes are sculpture by multiple scattering. Here we propose a graph approach to nanophotonics, and a network platform to design of light-matter interaction. We report a photonic network built from recurrent scattering in a mesh of subwavelength waveguides, with Anderson-localized network modes. These modes are designed via the network connectivity and topology and can be modeled by a graph description of Maxwell's equations. The photonic networks sustain random lasing action and exhibit lasing thresholds and optical properties which are determined by the network topology. Photonic network lasers are promising new device architectures for sensitive biosensing and for developing on-chip tunable laser sources for future information processing.
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    Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) is a computational imaging technique that overcomes the physical space-bandwidth product (SBP) limit of a conventional microscope by applying angular diversity illuminations. In the usual model of FPM, the microscopic system is approximated as being space-invariant with transfer function determined by a complex pupil function of the objective. However, in real experimental conditions, several unexpected "semi-bright and semi-dark" images with strong vignetting effect can be easily observed when the sample is illuminated by the LED within the "transition zone" between bright field and dark field. These imperfect images, apparently, are not coincident with the space-invariant model and could deteriorate the reconstruction quality severely. In this Letter, we examine the impact of this space-invariant approximation on FPM image formation based on rigorous wave optics-based analysis. Our analysis shows that for a practical FPM microscope with a low power objective and a large field of view, the space invariance is destroyed by diffraction at other stops associated with different lens elements to a large extent. A modified version of the space-variant model is derived and discussed. Two simple countermeasures are also presented and experimentally verified to bypass or partially alleviate the vignetting-induced reconstruction artifacts.
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    Light-shining-through-a-wall experiments represent a new experimental approach to search for undiscovered elementary particles not accessible with accelerator based experiments. The next generation of these experiments, such as ALPS II, require high finesse, long baseline optical cavities with fast length control. In this paper we report on a length stabilization control loop used to keep a cavity resonant with light at a wavelength of 532nm. It achieves a unity-gain-frequency of 4kHz and actuates on a mirror with a diameter of 50.8mm. This length control system was implemented on a 10m cavity and its projected performance meets the ALPS II requirements. The finesse of this cavity was measured to be 93,800$\pm$500 for 1064nm light, a value which is close to the design requirements for the ALPS II regeneration cavity.
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    We consider a one-dimensional photonic crystal composed of alternating layers of isotropic and anisotropic dielectric materials. Such a system has different band structures for different polarizations of light. We demonstrate that if an anisotropic defect layer is inserted into the structure, the crystal can support an optical bound state in the continuum. By tilting the principle dielectric axes of the defect layer relative to those of the photonic crystal we observe a long-lived resonance in the transmission spectrum. We derive an analytical expression for the decay rate of the resonance that agrees well with the numerical data by the Berreman anisotropic transfer matrix approach. An experimental set-up with a liquid crystal defect layer is proposed to tune the Q-factor of the resonance through applying an external electric field. We speculate that the set-up provides a simple and robust platform for observing optical bound states in the continuum in the form of resonances with tunable Q-factor.
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    Ultrathin planar absorbing layers, including semiconductor and metal films, and 2D materials, are promising building blocks for solar energy harvesting devices but poor light absorption has been a critical issue. Although interference in ultrathin absorbing layers has been studied to realize near perfect absorption at a specific wavelength, achieving high broadband absorption still remains challenging. Here, we both theoretically and experimentally demonstrated a method to tune not only reflection phase shift but also electromagnetic energy dissipation to design broadband solar absorber with simple planar structure consisting of an ultrathin absorbing layer separated from the metallic substrate by a transparent layer. We explicitly identified by deriving a new formulism that the absorbing material with refractive index proportional to the wavelength as well as extinction coefficient independent of the wavelength, is the ideal building block to create ultrathin planar broadband absorbers. To demonstrate the general strategy for naturally available absorbing materials in both high-loss (refractory metals) and weak-absorption (2D materials) regimes, we leveraged the bound-electron interband transition with a broad Lorentz oscillator peak to design a solar thermal absorber based on a ultrathin Cr layer; and leveraged the strong exciton attributed to the spin-orbit coupling for the spectrum near the band edge, and the bound-electron interband transition for shorter wavelengths, to design a solar photovoltaic absorber based on a atomically thin MoS2 layer. Furthermore, our designed ultrathin broadband solar absorbers with planar structures have comparable absorption properties compared to the absorbers with nanopatterns. Our proposed design strategies pave the way to novel nanometer thick energy harvesting and optoelectronic devices with simple planar structures.
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    The interaction of electromagnetic waves with metallic nanostructures generates resonant oscillations of the conduction-band electrons at the metal surface. These resonances can lead to large enhancements of the incident field and to the confinement of light to small regions, typically several orders of magnitude smaller than the incident wavelength. The accurate prediction of these resonances entails several challenges. Small geometric variations in the plasmonic structure may lead to large variations in the electromagnetic field responses. Furthermore, the material parameters that characterize the optical behavior of metals at the nanoscale need to be determined experimentally and are consequently subject to measurement errors. It then becomes essential that any predictive tool for the simulation and design of plasmonic structures accounts for fabrication tolerances and measurement uncertainties. In this paper, we develop a reduced order modeling framework that is capable of real-time accurate electromagnetic responses of plasmonic nanogap structures for a wide range of geometry and material parameters. The main ingredients of the proposed method are: (i) the hybridizable discontinuous Galerkin method to numerically solve the equations governing electromagnetic wave propagation in dielectric and metallic media, (ii) a reference domain formulation of the time-harmonic Maxwell's equations to account for geometry variations; and (iii) proper orthogonal decomposition and empirical interpolation techniques to construct an efficient reduced model. To demonstrate effectiveness of the models developed, we analyze geometry sensitivities and explore optimal designs of a 3D periodic annular nanogap structure.
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    Photon bunching with $g^{(2)}(0) > 45$ was observed in the cathodoluminescence of neutral nitrogen vacancy (NV$^{0}$) centers in nanodiamonds excited by a converged electron beam in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope. Spectrally resolved Hanbury Brown-Twiss interferometry is leveraged to demonstrate that the bunching emerges from the phonon sideband, while no observable bunching is detected at the zero-phonon line. This is consistent with fast phonon-mediated recombination dynamics, substantiated by agreement between a Bayesian regression and a Monte-Carlo model of super-thermal nitrogen vacancy luminescence.

Recent comments

Stefano Pirandola Nov 30 2016 06:45 UTC

Dear Mark, thx for your comment. There are indeed missing citations to previous works by Rafal, Janek and Lorenzo that we forgot to add. Regarding your paper, I did not read it in detail but I have two main comments:

1- What you are using is completely equivalent to the tool of "quantum simulatio

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Mark M. Wilde Nov 30 2016 02:18 UTC

An update http://arxiv.org/abs/1609.02160v2 of this paper has appeared, one day after the arXiv post http://arxiv.org/abs/1611.09165 . The paper http://arxiv.org/abs/1609.02160v2 now includes (without citation) some results for bosonic Gaussian channels found independently in http://arxiv.org/abs/16

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Mark M. Wilde Oct 06 2016 15:44 UTC

The following paper found a setting in which adaptive operations do not help in quantum channel discrimination:

https://arxiv.org/abs/1408.3373

It is published as

Communications in Mathematical Physics, vol. 344, no. 3, pages 797-829, June 2016

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2

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Piotr Migdał Mar 25 2014 12:25 UTC

Maybe I should not bring political issues here, but the saddest thing here is the affiliation:

> Ward 350 of Evin Prison, Tehran, Iran

Read more on Wikipedia: [Omid Kokabee](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omid_Kokabee).