Optics (physics.optics)

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    Quantum information science and quantum information technology have seen a virtual explosion world-wide. It is all based on the observation that fundamental quantum phenomena on the individual particle or system-level lead to completely novel ways of encoding, processing and transmitting information. Quantum mechanics, a child of the first third of the 20th century, has found numerous realizations and technical applications, much more than was thought at the beginning. Decades later, it became possible to do experiments with individual quantum particles and quantum systems. This was due to technological progress, and for light in particular, the development of the laser. Hitherto, nearly all experiments and also nearly all realizations in the fields have been performed with qubits, which are two-level quantum systems. We suggest that this limitation is again mainly a technological one, because it is very difficult to create, manipulate and measure more complex quantum systems. Here, we provide a specific overview of some recent developments with higher-dimensional quantum systems. We mainly focus on Orbital Angular Momentum (OAM) states of photons and possible applications in quantum information protocols. Such states form discrete higher-dimensional quantum systems, also called qudits. Specifically, we will first address the question what kind of new fundamental properties exist and the quantum information applications which are opened up by such novel systems. Then we give an overview of recent developments in the field by discussing several notable experiments over the past 2-3 years. Finally, we conclude with several important open questions which will be interesting for investigations in the future.
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    Superconducting detectors are now well-established tools for low-light optics, and in particular quantum optics, boasting high-efficiency, fast response and low noise. Similarly, lithium niobate is an important platform for integrated optics given its high second-order nonlinearity, used for high-speed electro-optic modulation and polarization conversion, as well as frequency conversion and sources of quantum light. Combining these technologies addresses the requirements for a single platform capable of generating, manipulating and measuring quantum light in many degrees of freedom, in a compact and potentially scalable manner. We will report on progress integrating tungsten transition-edge sensors (TESs) and amorphous tungsten silicide superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) on titanium in-diffused lithium niobate waveguides. The travelling-wave design couples the evanescent field from the waveguides into the superconducting absorber. We will report on simulations and measurements of the absorption, which we can characterize at room temperature prior to cooling down the devices. Independently, we show how the detectors respond to flood illumination, normally incident on the devices, demonstrating their functionality.
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    We discuss the standard ab initio calculation of the refractive index by means of the scalar dielectric function and show its inherent limitations. To overcome these, we start from the general, microscopic wave equation in materials in terms of the frequency- and wavevector-dependent dielectric tensor, and we investigate under which conditions the standard treatment can be justified. We then provide a more general method of calculating the frequency- and direction-dependent refractive indices by means of a $(2 \times 2)$ complex-valued "optical tensor", which can be calculated from a purely frequency-dependent conductivity tensor. Finally, we illustrate the meaning of this optical tensor for the prediction of optical material properties such as birefringence and optical activity.
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    The ability to induce, observe and control quantum coherent interactions in room temperature, electrically driven optoelectronic devices is of outmost significance for advancing quantum science and engineering towards practical applications. Following up on previous demonstrations of Rabi oscillations, self-induced transparency and coherent control by shaped optical excitation pulses in quantum dot (QD) optical amplifiers, we report here on measuring Ramsey fringes in such devices. Observation of Ramsey fringes in semiconductor QDs was previously achieved only at cryogenic temperatures, mainly in isolated single dot systems, while now they have been demonstrated in an inhomogeneously broadened QD ensemble in the form of a 1.5 mm long optical amplifier operating at room temperature. A high-resolution pump probe scheme where both pulses are characterized by cross frequency resolved optical gating revealed a clear oscillatory behavior of the amplitude and instantaneous frequency of the probe pulse with a period that equals one optical cycle. Moreover, the temporal position of the output probe pulse also oscillates with the same periodicity but with a quarter cycle delay relative to the intensity variations. This delay is the time domain manifestation of coupling between the real and imaginary parts of the complex susceptibility. Using nominal input delays of 600 to 900 fs and scanning the separation around each delay in 1 fs steps, we map the evolution of the material de-coherence and extract a coherence time of 410 fs.
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    Due to their broad spectral width, ultrashort lasers provide new possibilities to shape light beams and control their properties, in particular through the use of spatio-temporal couplings. In this context, we present a theoretical investigation of the linear propagation of ultrashort laser beams that combine temporal chirp and a standard aberration known as longitudinal chromatism. When such beams are focused in a vacuum, or in a linear medium, the interplay of these two effects can be exploited to set the velocity of the resulting intensity peak to arbitrary values within the Rayleigh length, i.e. precisely where laser pulses are generally used. Such beams could find groundbreaking applications in the control of laser-matter interactions, in particular for laser-driven particle acceleration.
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    We present a theoretical analysis that demonstrates that the far-field radiative heat transfer between objects with dimensions smaller than the thermal wavelength can overcome the Planckian limit by orders of magnitude. We illustrate this phenomenon with micron-sized structures that can be readily fabricated and tested with existing technology. Our work shows the dramatic failure of the classical theory to predict the far-field radiative heat transfer between micro- and nano-devices.
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    We report the first intensity correlation measured with star light since Hanbury Brown and Twiss' historical experiments. The photon bunching $g^{(2)}(\tau, r=0)$, obtained in the photon counting regime, was measured for 3 bright stars, $\alpha$ Boo, $\alpha$ CMi, and $\beta$ Gem. The light was collected at the focal plane of a 1~m optical telescope, was transported by a multi-mode optical fiber, split into two avalanche photodiodes and digitally correlated in real-time. For total exposure times of a few hours, we obtained contrast values around $2\times10^{-3}$, in agreement with the expectation for chaotic sources, given the optical and electronic bandwidths of our setup. Comparing our results with the measurement of Hanbury Brown et al. on $\alpha$ CMi, we argue for the timely opportunity to extend our experiments to measuring the spatial correlation function over existing and/or foreseen arrays of optical telescopes diluted over several kilometers. This would enable $\mu$as long-baseline interferometry in the optical, especially in the visible wavelengths with a limiting magnitude of 10.
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    We propose to construct a nonreciprocal single-photon frequency converter via multiple semi-infinite coupled-resonator waveguides (CRWs). We first demonstrate that the frequency of a single photon can be converted nonreciprocally through two CRWs, which are coupled indirectly by optomechanical interactions with two nondegenerate mechanical modes. Based on such nonreciprocity, two different single-photon circulators are proposed in the T-shaped waveguides consisting of three semi-infinite CRWs, which are coupled in pairwise by optomechanical interactions. One circulator is proposed by using two nondegenerate mechanical modes and the other one is proposed by using three nondegenerate mechanical modes. Nonreciprocal single-photon frequency conversion is induced by breaking the time-reversal symmetry, and the optimal conditions for nonreciprocal frequency conversion are obtained. These proposals can be used to realize nonreciprocal frequency conversion of single photons in any two distinctive waveguides with different frequencies and they can allow for dynamic control of the direction of frequency conversion by tuning the phases of external driving lasers, which may have versatile applications in hybrid quantum networks.
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    Computational modelling has made many useful contributions to the field of optical tweezers. One aspect in which it can be applied is the simulation of the dynamics of particles in optical tweezers. This can be useful for systems with many degrees of freedom, and for the simulation of experiments. While modelling of the optical force is a prerequisite for simulation of the motion of particles in optical traps, non-optical forces must also be included; the most important are usually Brownian motion and viscous drag. We discuss some applications and examples of such simulations. We review the theory and practical principles of simulation of optical tweezers, including the choice of method of calculation of optical force, numerical solution of the equations of motion of the particle, and finish with a discussion of a range of open problems.
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    Here we show a photonic design for tunable dual-wavelength generation deploying optical nonlinear mode coupling of two coupled III-V semiconductor microring resonators (MRRs) connected to a pump and drop waveguide buses. Here one of the two rings contains a grating, while the other has a planar surface. The underling mechanism for the dual wavelength generation originates from the resonance-detuning of the spectra resulting in non-linear mode mixing. Tunability of the wavelengths is achieved by altering the grating depth of the MRR and the power coupling coefficients. For the grating design of the MRR we select a trapezoidal-profiled apodized grating to gain low reflectivity at sidelobes. A time-domain travelling wave (TDTW) analysis gives a InGaAsP core refractive index of 3.3 surrounded by a grating InP cladding with n=3.2. We further confirm that the propagation of a Gaussian pulse input with 10 mW power and bandwidth of 0.76 ps is well confined within the mode propagation of the system. Taken together our results show a 2:1 fan-out of two spectrally separate signals for compact and high functional sources on chip.
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    Quantum correlated, highly non-degenerate photons can be used to synthesize disparate quantum nodes and link quantum processing over incompatible wavelengths, thereby constructing heterogeneous quantum systems for otherwise unattainable superior performance. Existing techniques for correlated photons have been concentrated in the visible and near-IR domains, with the photon pairs residing within one octave. Here, we demonstrate direct generation and detection of high-purity photon pairs at room temperature that are four octaves apart, one at 780 nm to match the rubidium D2 line, and the other at 3950 nm that falls in a transparent, low-scattering optical window for free space applications. The pairs are created via spontaneous parametric downconversion in a lithium niobate waveguide with specially designed geometry and periodic poling. The 780 nm photons are measured with a silicon avalanche photodiode, and the 3950 nm photons are measured with an upconversion photon detector using a similar waveguide, which attains 34% internal conversion efficiency. Quantum correlation measurement yields a high coincidence-to-accidental ratio of 54, which indicates the strong correlation with the extremely non-degenerate photon pairs. Our system bridges existing quantum technology to the challenging mid-IR regime, where unprecedented applications are expected in metrology, sensing, communications, medical diagnostics, and so on.
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    Circular dichroism (CD), induced by chirality, is an important tool for manipulating light or for characterizing morphology of molecules, proteins, crystals and nano-structures. CD is manifested over a wide size-range, from molecules to crystals or large nanostructures. Being a weak phenomenon (small fraction of absorption), CD is routinely measured on macroscopic amount of matter in solution, crystals, or arrays of fabricated meta-particles. These measurements mask the sensitivity of CD to small structural variation in nano-objects. Recently, several groups reported on chiroptical effects in individual nanoscale objects: Some, using near-field microscopy, where the tip-object interaction requires consideration. Some, using dark field scattering on large objects, and others by monitoring the fluorescence of individual chiral molecules. Here, we report on the direct observation of CD in individual nano-objects by far field extinction microscopy. CD measurements of both chiral shaped nanostructures (Gammadions) and nanocrystals (HgS) with chiral lattice structure are reported.
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    In the majority of optomechanical experiments, the interaction between light and mechanical motion is mediated by radiation pressure, which arises from momentum transfer of reflecting photons. This is an inherently weak interaction, and optically generated carriers in semiconductors have been predicted to be the mediator of different and potentially much stronger forces. Here we demonstrate optomechanical forces induced by electron-hole pairs in coupled quantum wells embedded into a free-free nanomembrane. We identify contributions from the deformation-potential and piezoelectric coupling and observe optically driven motion more than 500 times larger than expected from radiation pressure. The amplitude and phase of the driven oscillations are controlled by an applied electric field, which tunes the carrier lifetime to match the mechanical period. Our work opens perspectives for not only enhancing the optomechanical interaction in a range of experiments, but also for interfacing mechanical objects with complex macroscopic quantum objects, such as excitonic condensates.
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    Transforming a laser beam into a mass flow has been a challenge both scientifically and technologically. Here we report the discovery of a new optofluidics principle and demonstrate the generation of a steady-state water flow by a pulsed laser beam through a glass window. In order to generate a flow or stream in the same path as the refracted laser beam in pure water from an arbitrary spot on the window, we first fill a glass cuvette with an aqueous solution of Au nanoparticles. A flow will emerge from the focused laser spot on the window after the laser is turned on for a few to tens of minutes, the flow remains after the colloidal solution is completely replaced by pure water. Microscopically, this transformation is made possible by an underlying plasmonic nanoparticle-decorated cavity which is self-fabricated on the glass by nanoparticle-assisted laser etching and exhibits size and shape uniquely tailored to the incident beam profile. Hydrophone signals indicate that the flow is driven via acoustic streaming by a long-lasting ultrasound wave that is resonantly generated by the laser and the cavity through the photoacoustic effect. The principle of this light-driven flow via ultrasound, i.e. photoacoustic streaming by coupling photoacoustics to acoustic streaming, is general and can be applied to any liquids, opening up new research and applications in optofluidics as well as traditional photoacoustics and acoustic streaming.

Recent comments

Stefano Pirandola Nov 30 2016 06:45 UTC

Dear Mark, thx for your comment. There are indeed missing citations to previous works by Rafal, Janek and Lorenzo that we forgot to add. Regarding your paper, I did not read it in detail but I have two main comments:

1- What you are using is completely equivalent to the tool of "quantum simulatio

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Mark M. Wilde Nov 30 2016 02:18 UTC

An update http://arxiv.org/abs/1609.02160v2 of this paper has appeared, one day after the arXiv post http://arxiv.org/abs/1611.09165 . The paper http://arxiv.org/abs/1609.02160v2 now includes (without citation) some results for bosonic Gaussian channels found independently in http://arxiv.org/abs/16

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Mark M. Wilde Oct 06 2016 15:44 UTC

The following paper found a setting in which adaptive operations do not help in quantum channel discrimination:

https://arxiv.org/abs/1408.3373

It is published as

Communications in Mathematical Physics, vol. 344, no. 3, pages 797-829, June 2016

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2

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Piotr Migdał Mar 25 2014 12:25 UTC

Maybe I should not bring political issues here, but the saddest thing here is the affiliation:

> Ward 350 of Evin Prison, Tehran, Iran

Read more on Wikipedia: [Omid Kokabee](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omid_Kokabee).