Medical Physics (physics.med-ph)

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    Aims. Clinical data indicating a heart rate (HR) target during rate control therapy for permanent atrial fibrillation (AF) and assessing its eventual relationship with reduced exercise tolerance are lacking. The present study aims at investigating the impact of resting HR on the hemodynamic response to exercise in permanent AF patients by means of a computational cardiovascular model. Methods. The AF lumped-parameter model was run to simulate resting (1 Metabolic Equivalent of Task-MET) and various exercise conditions (4 METs: brisk walking; 6 METs: skiing; 8 METs: running), considering different resting HR (70 bpm for the slower resting HR-SHR simulations, and 100 bpm for the higher resting HR-HHR simulations). To compare relative variations of cardiovascular variables upon exertion, the variation comparative index (VCI) - the absolute variation between the exercise and the resting values in SHR simulations referred to the absolute variation in HHR simulations -was calculated at each exercise grade (VCI4, VCI6 and VCI8). Results. Pulmonary venous pressure underwent a greater increase in HHR compared to SHR simulations (VCI4 = 0.71, VCI6 = 0.73 and VCI8 = 0.77), while for systemic arterial pressure the opposite is true (VCI4 = 1.15, VCI6 = 1.36, VCI8 = 1.56). Conclusions. The computational findings suggest that a slower, with respect to a higher resting HR, might be preferable in permanent AF patients, since during exercise pulmonary venous pressure undergoes a slighter increase and systemic blood pressure reveals a more appropriate increase.
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    Hand-crafted features extracted from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images (DCE-MRIs) have shown strong predictive abilities in characterization of breast lesions. However, heterogeneity across medical image datasets hinders the generalizability of these features. One of the sources of the heterogeneity is the variation of MR scanner magnet strength, which has a strong influence on image quality, leading to variations in the extracted image features. Thus, statistical decision algorithms need to account for such data heterogeneity. Despite the variations, we hypothesize that there exist underlying relationships between the features extracted from the datasets acquired with different magnet strength MR scanners. We compared the use of a multi-task learning (MTL) method that incorporates those relationships during the classifier training to support vector machines run on a merged dataset that includes cases with various MRI strength images. As a result, higher predictive power is achieved with the MTL method.
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    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is an emerging medical imaging modality that is not yet adopted by clinical practice. Most of the working MPI prototypes including commercial-grade research MPI scanners utilize cylindrical bores that limit the access to the scanner and the imaging volume. Recently a single-sided or an asymmetric device that is based on a field-free point (FFP) coplanar coil topology has been introduced that shows promise in alleviating access constraint issues. In this paper, we present a simulation study of selection coils for a novel design of a single-sided MPI device that has an advantage of a more sensitive field-free line (FFL) topology.
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    The monitoring of sleep patterns without patient's inconvenience or involvement of a medical specialist is a clinical question of significant importance. To this end, we propose an automatic sleep stage monitoring system based on an affordable, unobtrusive, discreet, and long-term wearable in-ear sensor for recording the Electroencephalogram (ear-EEG). The selected features for sleep pattern classification from a single ear-EEG channel include the spectral edge frequency (SEF) and multi- scale fuzzy entropy (MSFE), a structural complexity feature. In this preliminary study, the manually scored hypnograms from simultaneous scalp-EEG and ear-EEG recordings of four subjects are used as labels for two analysis scenarios: 1) classification of ear-EEG hypnogram labels from ear-EEG recordings and 2) prediction of scalp-EEG hypnogram labels from ear-EEG recordings. We consider both 2-class and 4-class sleep scoring, with the achieved accuracies ranging from 78.5 % to 95.2 % for ear-EEG labels predicted from ear-EEG, and 76.8 % to 91.8 % for scalp-EEG labels predicted from ear-EEG. The corresponding kappa coefficients, which range from 0.64 to 0.83 for Scenario 1 and from 0.65 to 0.80 for Scenario 2, indicate a Substantial to Almost Perfect agreement, thus proving the feasibility of in-ear sensing for sleep monitoring in the community.