Instrumentation and Detectors (physics.ins-det)

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    Superconducting detectors are now well-established tools for low-light optics, and in particular quantum optics, boasting high-efficiency, fast response and low noise. Similarly, lithium niobate is an important platform for integrated optics given its high second-order nonlinearity, used for high-speed electro-optic modulation and polarization conversion, as well as frequency conversion and sources of quantum light. Combining these technologies addresses the requirements for a single platform capable of generating, manipulating and measuring quantum light in many degrees of freedom, in a compact and potentially scalable manner. We will report on progress integrating tungsten transition-edge sensors (TESs) and amorphous tungsten silicide superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) on titanium in-diffused lithium niobate waveguides. The travelling-wave design couples the evanescent field from the waveguides into the superconducting absorber. We will report on simulations and measurements of the absorption, which we can characterize at room temperature prior to cooling down the devices. Independently, we show how the detectors respond to flood illumination, normally incident on the devices, demonstrating their functionality.
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    Sensitive, real-time optical magnetometry with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond relies on accurate imaging of small ($\ll 10^{-2}$) fractional fluorescence changes across the diamond sample. We discuss the limitations on magnetic-field sensitivity resulting from the limited number of photoelectrons that a camera can record in a given time. Several types of camera sensors are analyzed and the smallest measurable magnetic-field change is estimated for each type. We show that most common sensors are of a limited use in such applications, while certain highly specific cameras allow to achieve nanotesla-level sensitivity in $1$~s of a combined exposure. Finally, we demonstrate the results obtained with a lock-in camera that pave the way for real-time, wide-field magnetometry at the nanotesla level and with micrometer resolution.
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    A tabletop low-noise differential amplifer with a bandwidth of 100 kHz is presented. Low voltage drifts of the order of 100 nV/day are reached by thermally stabilizing relevant amplifer components. The input leakage current is below 100 fA. Input-stage errors are reduced by extensive circuitry. Voltage noise, current noise, input capacitance and input current are extraordinarily low. The input resistance is larger than 1 TOhm. The amplifers were tested with and deployed for electrical transport measurements of quantum devices at cryogenic temperatures.
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    The Boulby Underground Germanium Suite (BUGS) comprises three low background, high-purity germanium detectors operating in the Boulby Underground Laboratory, located 1.1 km underground in the north-east of England, UK. BUGS utilises three types of detector to facilitate a high-sensitivity, high-throughput radioassay programme to support the development of rare-event search experiments. A Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detector delivers sensitivity to low-energy gamma-rays such as those emitted by 210Pb and 234Th. A Small Anode Germanium (SAGe) well-type detector is employed for efficient screening of small samples. Finally, a standard p-type coaxial detector provides fast screening of standard samples. This paper presents the steps used to characterise the performance of these detectors for a variety of sample geometries, including the corrections applied to account for cascade summing effects. For low-density materials, BUGS is able to radio-assay to specific activities down to 3.6 mBq/kg for 234Th and 6.6 mBq/kg for 210Pb both of which have uncovered some significant equilibrium breaks in the 238U chain. In denser materials, where gamma-ray self-absorption increases, sensitivity is demonstrated to specific activities of 0.9 mBq/kg for 226Ra, 1.1 mBq/kg for 228 Ra, 0.3 mBq/kg for 224Ra, and 8.6 mBq/kg for 40K with all upper limits at a 90% confidence level. These meet the requirements of most screening campaigns presently under way for rare-event search experiments, such as the LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) dark matter experiment. We also highlight the ability of the BEGe detector to probe the X-ray fluorescence region which can be important to identify the presence of radioisotopes associated with neutron production; this is of particular relevance in experiments sensitive to nuclear recoils.
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    In this work we address the advantages, limitations, and technical subtleties of employing FPGA-based digital servos for high-bandwidth feedback control of lasers in atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics experiments. Specifically, we provide the results of benchmark performance tests in experimental setups including noise, bandwidth, and dynamic range for two digital servos built with low and mid-range priced FPGA development platforms. The digital servo results are compared to results obtained from a commercially available state-of-the-art analog servo using the same plant for control (intensity stabilization). The digital servos have feedback bandwidths of 2.5 MHz, limited by the total signal latency, and we demonstrate improvements beyond the transfer function offered by the analog servo including a three pole filter and a two pole filter with phase compensation to suppress resonances. We also discuss limitations of our FPGA-servo implementation and general considerations when designing and using digital servos.
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    A stress is applied at the flat face and the apex of a prismatic piezoelectric crystal. The voltage generated at these points differs in order of magnitude. The result may be used to nondestructively test the uniformity of surfaces of piezoelectric crystals.