Instrumentation and Detectors (physics.ins-det)

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    We demonstrate identification of position, material, orientation and shape of objects imaged by an $^{85}$Rb atomic magnetometer performing electromagnetic induction imaging supported by machine learning. Machine learning maximizes the information extracted from the images created by the magnetometer, demonstrating the use of hidden data. Localization 2.6 times better than the spatial resolution of the imaging system and successful classification up to 97$\%$ are obtained. This circumvents the need of solving the inverse problem, and demonstrates the extension of machine learning to diffusive systems such as low-frequency electrodynamics in media. Automated collection of task-relevant information from quantum-based electromagnetic imaging will have a relevant impact from biomedicine to security.
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    We conduct a comprehensive set of tests of performance of surface coils used for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study of quasi 2-dimensional samples. We report ${^{115} \rm{In}}$ and ${^{31} \rm{P}}$ NMR measurements on InP, semi-conducting thin substrate samples. Surface coils of both zig-zag meander-line and concentric spiral geometries were used. We compare reception sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of NMR signal obtained by using surface-type coils to that obtained by standard solenoid-type coils. As expected, we find that surface-type coils provide better sensitivity for NMR study of thin films samples. Moreover, we compare the reception sensitivity of different types of the surface coils. We identify the optimal geometry of the surface coils for a given application and/or direction of the applied magnetic field.
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    Recent progress in the development of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) made of amorphous material has delivered excellent performances, and has had a great impact on a range of research fields. Despite showing the highest system detection efficiency (SDE) ever reported with SNSPDs, amorphous materials typically lead to lower critical currents, which impacts on their jitter performance. Combining a very low jitter and a high SDE remains a challenge. Here, we report on highly efficient superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors based on amorphous MoSi, combining system jitters as low as 26 ps and a SDE of 80% at 1550 nm. We also report detailed observations on the jitter behaviour, which hints at intrinsic limitations and leads to practical implications for SNSPD performance.
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    High Energy Particle Physics experiments at the LHC use hybrid silicon detectors, in both pixel and strip geometry, for their inner trackers. These detectors have proven to be very reliable and performant. Nevertheless, there is great interest in the development of depleted CMOS silicon detectors, which could achieve similar performances at lower cost of production and complexity. We present recent developments of this technology in the framework of the ATLAS CMOS demonstrator project. In particular, studies of two active sensors from LFoundry, CCPD_LF and LFCPIX, and the first fully monolithic prototype MONOPIX will be shown.
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    We report results of a search for light weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) dark matter from CDEX-1 experiment at the China Jinping Underground Laboratory (CJPL). Constraints on WIMP-nucleon spin-independent (SI) and spin-dependent (SD) couplings are derived with a physics threshold of 160 eVee, from an exposure of 737.1 kg-days. The SI and SD limits extend the lower reach of light WIMPs to 2 GeV and improve over our earlier bounds at WIMPs mass less than 6 GeV.
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    Light-shining-through-a-wall experiments represent a new experimental approach to search for undiscovered elementary particles not accessible with accelerator based experiments. The next generation of these experiments, such as ALPS II, require high finesse, long baseline optical cavities with fast length control. In this paper we report on a length stabilization control loop used to keep a cavity resonant with light at a wavelength of 532nm. It achieves a unity-gain-frequency of 4kHz and actuates on a mirror with a diameter of 50.8mm. This length control system was implemented on a 10m cavity and its projected performance meets the ALPS II requirements. The finesse of this cavity was measured to be 93,800$\pm$500 for 1064nm light, a value which is close to the design requirements for the ALPS II regeneration cavity.
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    This study developed a method to measure compound-specific chlorine isotopologue distribution of organochlorines for source identification and apportionment. Complete chlorine isotopologues of individual model organochlorines were detected by gas chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS). The measured relative abundances (RAmea), simulated relative abundances (RAsim), and relative variations between RAmea and RAsim (${\Delta}$RA) were obtained on basis of the detected MS signal intensities of individual isotopologues. The method has been partially validated in precision, injection-amount dependency and temporal drifts. The standard deviations (SDs) of RAmea of all istotopologues of perchlorethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) from different manufacturers were 0.002%-0.069%. The SDs of ${\Delta}$RA of the first three isotopologues of PCE and TCE from different manufacturers were 0.026%-0.155%. The ${\Delta}$RA and ${\Delta}$RA patterns of the standards of PCE and TCE from different manufacturers were able to be differentiated with statistical significance. The method has been successfully applied to an analogous case of source identification and apportionment for two trichlorodiphenyls that exhibited significant chlorine isotope fractionation on the GC-HRMS system. The results demonstrate that the ${\Delta}$RA in conjunction with isotope ratios can be applied to source identification and present high-validity identification outcomes. Moreover, the RAmea can be used to implement source apportionment for organochlorines from more sources with more reliable outcomes compared with the methods using isotope ratios only. This method opens a new way to perform fingerprinting analysis of compound-specific chlorine isotopologue distribution of organochlorines, and will be a promising high-performance approach in source delineation and apportionment for chlorinated organic compounds.
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    This paper presents the model-based design and evaluation of an instrument that estimates incident neutron direction using the kinematics of neutron scattering by hydrogen-1 nuclei in an organic scintillator. The instrument design uses a single, nearly contiguous volume of organic scintillator that is internally subdivided only as necessary to create optically isolated pillars. Scintillation light emitted in a given pillar is confined to that pillar by a combination of total internal reflection and a specular reflector applied to the four sides of the pillar transverse to its long axis. The scintillation light is collected at each end of the pillar using a photodetector. In this optically segmented design, the (x, y) position of scintillation light emission (where the x and y coordinates are transverse to the long axis of the pillars) is estimated as the pillar's (x, y) position in the scintillator "block", and the z-position (the position along the pillar's long axis) is estimated from the amplitude and relative timing of the signals produced by the photodetectors at each end of the pillar. For proton recoils greater than 1 MeV, we show that the (x, y, z)-position of neutron-proton scattering can be estimated with < 1 cm root-mean-squared [RMS] error and the proton recoil energy can be estimated with < 50 keV RMS error by fitting the photodetectors' response time history to models of optical photon transport within the scintillator pillars. Finally, we evaluate several alternative designs of this proposed single-volume scatter camera made of pillars of plastic scintillator (SVSC-PiPS), studying the effect of pillar dimensions, scintillator material, and photodetector response vs. time. Specifically, we conclude that an SVSC-PiPS constructed using EJ-204 and an MCP-PM will produce the most precise estimates of incident neutron direction and energy.
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    Construction of silicon neutron interferometers requires a perfect crystal silicon ingot (5 cm to 30 cm long) be machined such that Bragg diffracting "blades" protrude from a common base. Leaving the interferometer blades connected to the same base preserves Bragg plane alignment, but if the interferometer contains crystallographic misalignments of greater than about 10 nrad between the blades, interference fringe visibility begins to suffer. Additionally, the parallelism, thickness, and distance between the blades must be machined to micron tolerances. Traditionally, interferometers do not exhibit usable interference fringe visibility until 30 $\mu$m to 60 $\mu$m of machining surface damage is chemically etched away. However, if too much material is removed, the uneven etch rates across the interferometer cause the shape of the crystal blades to be outside of the required tolerances. As a result, the ultimate interference fringe visibility varies widely among neutron interferometers that are created under similar conditions. We find that annealing a previously etched interferometer at $800^\circ \mathrm{C}$ dramatically increased interference fringe visibility from 23 % to 90 %. The Bragg plane misalignments were also measured before and after annealing using neutron rocking curve interference peaks, showing that Bragg plane alignment was improved across the interferometer after annealing. This suggests that current interferometers with low fringe visibility may be salvageable and that annealing may become an important step in the fabrication process of future neutron interferometers, leading to less need for chemical etching and larger, more exotic neutron interferometers.
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    The Liquids Reflectometer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory provides neutron reflectivity capability for an average of about 30 experiments each year. In recent years, there has been a large effort to streamline the data processing and analysis for the instrument. While much of the data reduction can be automated, data analysis remains something that needs to be done by scientists. For this purpose, we present a reflectivity fitting web interface that captures the process of setting up and executing fits while reducing the need for installing software or writing Python scripts.