Instrumentation and Detectors (physics.ins-det)

  • PDF
    The RICH detector of the NA62 experiment at CERN SPS is required to suppress $\mu^+$ contamination in $K^+ \to \pi^+ \nu \bar\nu$ candidate events by a factor at least 100 between 15 and 35 GeV/c momentum, to measure the pion arrival time with $\sim 100$ ps resolution and to produce a trigger for a charged track. It consists of a 17 m long tank filled with Neon gas at atmospheric pressure. Čerenkov light is reflected by a mosaic of 20 spherical mirrors placed at the downstream end of the vessel and is collected by 1952 photomultipliers placed at the upstream end. The construction of the detector will be described and the performance reached during first runs will be discussed.
  • PDF
    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE), one of the four scientific space science missions within the framework of the Strategic Pioneer Program on Space Science of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, is a general purpose high energy cosmic-ray and gamma-ray observatory, which was successfully launched on December 17th, 2015 from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center. The DAMPE scientific objectives include the study of galactic cosmic rays up to $\sim 10$ TeV and hundreds of TeV for electrons/gammas and nuclei respectively, and the search for dark matter signatures in their spectra. In this paper we illustrate the layout of the DAMPE instrument, and discuss the results of beam tests and calibrations performed on ground. Finally we present the expected performance in space and give an overview of the mission key scientific goals.
  • PDF
    Torque magnetometry is a key method to measure the magnetic anisotropy and quantum oscillations in metals. In order to resolve quantum oscillations in sub-millimeter sized samples, piezo-electric micro-cantilevers were introduced. In the case of strongly correlated metals with large Fermi surfaces and high cyclotron masses, magnetic torque sensitivities in excess of $10^4$ are required at temperatures well below 1 K and magnetic fields beyond 10 T. Here, we present a new broadband read-out scheme for piezo-electric micro-cantilevers and Wheatstone type resistance measurements in magnetic fields up to 15 T and temperatures down to 100 mK. By using a two-stage SQUID as null detector of a cold Wheatstone bridge, we were able to achieve a magnetic moment resolution of $\Delta m = 2\times10^{14}$ J/T at maximal field, outperforming conventional magnetometers by at least one order of magnitude in this temperature and magnetic field range. Exemplary de Haas-van Alphen measurement of a newly grown delafossite, PdRhO$_2$, were used to show the superior performance of our setup.
  • PDF
    Acoustic neutrino detection is a promising approach to extend the energy range of neutrino telescopes to energies beyond $10^{18}$\u2009eV. Currently operational and planned water-Cherenkov neutrino telescopes, most notably KM3NeT, include acoustic sensors in addition to the optical ones. These acoustic sensors could be used as instruments for acoustic detection, while their main purpose is the position calibration of the detection units. In this article, a Monte Carlo simulation chain for acoustic detectors will be presented, covering the initial interaction of the neutrino up to the signal classification of recorded events. The ambient and transient background in the simulation was implemented according to data recorded by the acoustic set-up AMADEUS inside the ANTARES detector. The effects of refraction on the neutrino signature in the detector are studied, and a classification of the recorded events is implemented. As bipolar waveforms similar to those of the expected neutrino signals are also emitted from other sound sources, additional features like the geometrical shape of the propagation have to be considered for the signal classification. This leads to a large improvement of the background suppression by almost two orders of magnitude, since a flat cylindrical "pancake" propagation pattern is a distinctive feature of neutrino signals. An overview of the simulation chain and the signal classification will be presented and preliminary studies of the performance of the classification will be discussed.
  • PDF
    The OPERA experiment was designed to search for $\nu_{\mu} \rightarrow \nu_{\tau}$ oscillations in appearance mode through the direct observation of tau neutrinos in the CNGS neutrino beam. In this paper, we report a study of the multiplicity of charged particles produced in charged-current neutrino interactions in lead. We present charged hadron average multiplicities, their dispersion and investigate the KNO scaling in different kinematical regions. The results are presented in detail in the form of tables that can be used in the validation of Monte Carlo generators of neutrino-lead interactions.
  • PDF
    The performance of the upgraded solid deuterium ultracold neutron source at the pulsed reactor TRIGA Mainz is described. The current configuration stage comprises the installation of a He liquefier to run UCN experiments over long-term periods, the use of stainless steel neutron guides with improved transmission as well as sputter-coated non-magnetic $^{58}$NiMo alloy at the inside walls of the thermal bridge and the converter cup. The UCN yield was measured in a `standard' UCN storage bottle (stainless steel) with a volume of 32 liters outside the biological shield at the experimental area yielding UCN densities of 8.5 /cm$^3$; an increase by a factor of 3.5 compared to the former setup. The measured UCN storage curve is in good agreement with the predictions from a Monte Carlo simulation developed to model the source. The growth and formation of the solid deuterium converter during freeze-out are affected by the ortho/para ratio of the H$_2$ premoderator.
  • PDF
    High precision, high numerical aperture mirrors are desirable for mediating strong atom-light coupling in quantum optics applications and can also serve as important reference surfaces for optical metrology. In this work we demonstrate the fabrication of highly-precise hemispheric mirrors with numerical aperture NA = 0.996. The mirrors were fabricated from aluminum by single-point diamond turning using a stable ultra- precision lathe calibrated with an in-situ white-light interferometer. Our mirrors have a diameter of 25 mm and were characterized using a combination of wide-angle single- shot and small-angle stitched multi-shot interferometry. The measurements show root- mean-square (RMS) form errors consistently below 25 nm. The smoothest of our mirrors has a RMS error of 14 nm and a peak-to-valley (PV) error of 88 nm, which corresponds to a form accuracy of $\lambda$=50 for visible optics.
  • PDF
    In this paper, we report the development of an intensity modulated fiber optic sensor for angular displacement measurement. This sensor was designed to present high sensitivity, linear response, wide bandwidth and, furthermore, to be simple and low cost. The sensor comprises two optical fibers, a positive lens, a reflective surface, an optical source, and a photodetector. A mathematical model was developed to determine and simulate the static characteristic curve of the sensor and to compare different sensor configurations regarding the core radii of the optical fibers. The simulation results showed that the sensor configurations tested are highly sensitive to small angle variation (in the range of microradians) with nonlinearity less than or equal to 1\%. The normalized sensitivity ranges from $(0.25\times V_{\rm max})$ to $(2.40\times V_{\rm max})$ mV/$\mu$rad (where $V_{\rm max}$ is the peak voltage of the static characteristic curve) and the linear range, from 194 to 1840 $\mu$rad. The unnormalized sensitivity for a reflective surface with reflectivity of 100\% was measured as 7.7 mV/$\mu$rad. The simulations were compared with experimental results to validate the mathematical model and to define the most suitable configuration for ultrasonic detection. The sensor was tested on the characterization of a piezoelectric transducer and as part of a laser ultrasonics setup. The velocity of the longitudinal, shear, and surface waves were measured on aluminum samples as 6.43 mm/$\mu$s, 3.17 mm/$\mu$s, 2.96 mm/$\mu$s, respectively, with an error smaller than 1.3\%. The sensor proved to be suitable to detect ultrasonic waves and to perform time-of-flight measurements and nondestructive inspection, being an alternative to the piezoelectric or the interferometric detectors.