Geophysics (physics.geo-ph)

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    When modeling global satellite data to recover a planetary magnetic or gravitational potential field and evaluate it elsewhere, the method of choice remains their analysis in terms of spherical harmonics. When only regional data are available, or when data quality varies strongly with geographic location, the inversion problem becomes severely ill-posed. In those cases, adopting explicitly local methods is to be preferred over adapting global ones (e.g., by regularization). Here, we develop the theory behind a procedure to invert for planetary potential fields from vector observations collected within a spatially bounded region at varying satellite altitude. Our method relies on the construction of spatiospectrally localized bases of functions that mitigate the noise amplification caused by downward continuation (from the satellite altitude to the planetary surface) while balancing the conflicting demands for spatial concentration and spectral limitation. Solving simultaneously for internal and external fields in the same setting of regional data availability reduces internal-field artifacts introduced by downward-continuing unmodeled external fields, as we show with numerical examples. The AC-GVSF are optimal linear combinations of vector spherical harmonics. Their construction is not altogether very computationally demanding when the concentration domains (the regions of spatial concentration) have circular symmetry, e.g., on spherical caps or rings - even when the spherical-harmonic bandwidth is large. Data inversion proceeds by solving for the expansion coefficients of truncated function sequences, by least-squares analysis in a reduced-dimensional space. Hence, our method brings high-resolution regional potential-field modeling from incomplete and noisy vector-valued satellite data within reach of contemporary desktop machines.
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    Xu et al. [J. Asian Earth Sci. \bf 77, 59-65 (2013)] It has just been reported that approximately 2 months prior to the $M_w$9.0 Tohoku earthquake that occurred in Japan on 11 March 2011 anomalous variations of the geomagnetic field have been observed in the vertical component at a measuring station about 135 km from the epicenter for about 10 days (4 to 14 January 2011). Here, we show that this observation is in striking agreement with independent recent results obtained from natural time analysis of seismicity in Japan. In particular, this analysis has revealed that an unprecedented minimum of the order parameter fluctuations of seismicity was observed around 5 January 2011, thus pointing to the initiation at that date of a strong precursory Seismic Electric Signals activity accompanied by the anomalous geomagnetic field variations. Starting from this date, natural time analysis of the subsequent seismicity indicates that a strong mainshock was expected in a few days to one week after 08:40 LT on 10 March 2011.
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    Applying Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) to the geomagnetic data recorded at three measuring stations in Japan, Rong et al. in 2012 reported that anomalous magnetic field variations were identified well before the occurrence of the disastrous Tohoku $M_w$9.0 earthquake that occurred on 11 March 2011 in Japan exhibiting increased "non-uniform" scaling behavior. Here, we provide an explanation for the appearance of this increase of "non-uniform" scaling on the following grounds: These magnetic field variations are the ones that accompany the electric field variations termed Seismic Electric Signals (SES) activity which have been repeatedly reported that precede major earthquakes. DFA as well as multifractal DFA reveal that the latter electric field variations exhibit scaling behavior as shown by analyzing SES activities observed before major earthquakes in Greece. Hence, when these variations are superimposed on a background of pseudosinusoidal trend, their long range correlation properties -quantified by DFA- are affected resulting in an increase of the "non-uniform" scaling behavior. The same is expected to hold for the former magnetic field variations.