Geophysics (physics.geo-ph)

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    $^{222}$Rn is a noble radioactive gas produced along the $^{238}$U decay chain, which is present in the majority of soils and rocks. As $^{222}$Rn is the most relevant source of natural background radiation, understanding its distribution in the environment is of great concern for investigating the health impacts of low-level radioactivity and for supporting regulation of human exposure to ionizing radiation in modern society. At the same time, $^{222}$Rn is a widespread atmospheric tracer whose spatial distribution is generally used as a proxy for climate and pollution studies. Airborne gamma-ray spectroscopy (AGRS) always treated $^{222}$Rn as a source of background since it affects the indirect estimate of equivalent $^{238}$U concentration. In this work the AGRS method is used for the first time for quantifying the presence of $^{222}$Rn in the atmosphere and assessing its vertical profile. High statistics radiometric data acquired during an offshore survey are fitted as a superposition of a constant component due to the experimental setup background radioactivity plus a height dependent contribution due to cosmic radiation and atmospheric $^{222}$Rn. The refined statistical analysis provides not only a conclusive evidence of AGRS $^{222}$Rn detection but also a (0.96 $\pm$ 0.07) Bq/m$^{3}$ $^{222}$Rn concentration and a (1318 $\pm$ 22) m atmospheric layer depth fully compatible with literature data.
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    In this paper we present the results of a $\sim$5 hour airborne gamma-ray survey carried out over the Tyrrhenian sea in which the height range (77-3066) m has been investigated. Gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements have been performed by using the AGRS_16L detector, a module of four 4L NaI(Tl) crystals. The experimental setup was mounted on the Radgyro, a prototype aircraft designed for multisensorial acquisitions in the field of proximal remote sensing. By acquiring high-statistics spectra over the sea (i.e. in the absence of signals having geological origin) and by spanning a wide spectrum of altitudes it has been possible to split the measured count rate into a constant aircraft component and a cosmic component exponentially increasing with increasing height. The monitoring of the count rate having pure cosmic origin in the >3 MeV energy region allowed to infer the background count rates in the $^{40}$K, $^{214}$Bi and $^{208}$Tl photopeaks, which need to be subtracted in processing airborne gamma-ray data in order to estimate the potassium, uranium and thorium abundances in the ground. Moreover, a calibration procedure has been carried out by implementing the CARI-6P and EXPACS dosimetry tools, according to which the annual cosmic effective dose to human population has been linearly related to the measured cosmic count rates.
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    Regional characterization of the continental crust has classically been performed through either geologic mapping, geochemical sampling, or geophysical surveys. Rarely are these techniques fully integrated, due to limits of data coverage, quality, and/or incompatible datasets. We combine geologic observations, geochemical sampling, and geophysical surveys to create a coherent 3-D geologic model of a 50 x 50 km upper crustal region surrounding the SNOLAB underground physics laboratory in Canada, which includes the Southern Province, the Superior Province, the Sudbury Structure and the Grenville Front Tectonic Zone. Nine representative aggregate units of exposed lithologies are geologically characterized, geophysically constrained, and probed with 109 rock samples supported by compiled geochemical databases. A detailed study of the lognormal distributions of U and Th abundances and of their correlation permits a bivariate analysis for a robust treatment of the uncertainties. A downloadable 3D numerical model of U and Th distribution defines an average heat production of 1.5$^{+1.4}_{-0.7}$$\mu$W/m$^{3}$, and predicts a contribution of 7.7$^{+7.7}_{-3.0}$TNU (a Terrestrial Neutrino Unit is one geoneutrino event per 10$^{32}$ target protons per year) out of a crustal geoneutrino signal of 31.1$^{+8.0}_{-4.5}$TNU. The relatively high local crust geoneutrino signal together with its large variability strongly restrict the SNO+ capability of experimentally discriminating among BSE compositional models of the mantle. Future work to constrain the crustal heat production and the geoneutrino signal at SNO+ will be inefficient without more detailed geophysical characterization of the 3D structure of the heterogeneous Huronian Supergroup, which contributes the largest uncertainty to the calculation.