Fluid Dynamics (physics.flu-dyn)

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    Plane Poiseuille flow, the pressure driven flow between parallel plates, shows a route to turbulence connected with a linear instability to Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves, and another one, the bypass transition, that is triggered with finite amplitude perturbation. We use direct numerical simulations to explore the arrangement of the different routes to turbulence among the set of initial conditions. For plates that are a distance $2H$ apart and in a domain of width $2\pi H$ and length $2\pi H$ the subcritical instability to TS waves sets in at $Re_{c}=5815$ that extends down to $Re_{TS}\approx4884$. The bypass route becomes available above $Re_E=459$ with the appearance of three-dimensional finite-amplitude traveling waves. The bypass transition covers a large set of finite amplitude perturbations. Below $Re_c$, TS appear for a tiny set of initial conditions that grows with increasing Reynolds number. Above $Re_c$ the previously stable region becomes unstable via TS waves, but a sharp transition to the bypass route can still be identified. Both routes lead to the same turbulent in the final stage of the transition, but on different time scales. Similar phenomena can be expected in other flows where two or more routes to turbulence compete.
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    We investigate the accuracy and robustness of one of the most common methods used in glaciology for the discretization of the $\mathfrak{p}$-Stokes equations: equal order finite elements with Galerkin Least-Squares (GLS) stabilization. Furthermore we compare the results to other stabilized methods. We find that the vertical velocity component is more sensitive to the choice of GLS stabilization parameter than horizontal velocity. Additionally, the accuracy of the vertical velocity component is especially important since errors in this component can cause ice surface instabilities and propagate into future ice volume predictions. If the element cell size is set to the minimum edge length and the stabilization parameter is allowed to vary non-linearly with viscosity, the GLS stabilization parameter found in literature is a good choice on simple domains. However, near ice margins the standard parameter choice may result in significant oscillations in the vertical component of the surface velocity. For these cases, other stabilization techniques, such as the interior penalty method, result in better accuracy and are less sensitive to the choice of the stabilization parameter. During this work we also discovered that the manufactured solutions often used to evaluate errors in glaciology are not reliable due to high artificial surface forces at singularities. We perform our numerical experiments in both FEniCS and Elmer/Ice.
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    Understanding the statistics of ocean geostrophic turbulence is of utmost importance in understanding its interactions with the global ocean circulation and the climate system as a whole. Here, a study of eddy-mixing entropy in a forced-dissipative barotropic ocean model is presented. Entropy is a concept of fundamental importance in statistical physics and information theory; motivated by equilibrium statistical mechanics theories of ideal geophysical fluids, we consider the effect of forcing and dissipation on eddy-mixing entropy, both analytically and numerically. By diagnosing the time evolution of eddy-mixing entropy it is shown that the entropy provides a descriptive tool for understanding three stages of the turbulence life cycle: growth of instability, formation of large scale structures and steady state fluctuations. Further, by determining the relationship between the time evolution of entropy and the maximum entropy principle, evidence is found for the action of this principle in a forced-dissipative flow. The maximum entropy potential vorticity statistics are calculated for the flow and are compared with numerical simulations. Deficiencies of the maximum entropy statistics are discussed in the context of the mean-field approximation for energy. This study highlights the importance entropy and statistical mechanics in the study of geostrophic turbulence.
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    We explore the scaling behavior of an unsteady flow that is generated by an oscillating body of finite size in a gas. If the gas is gradually rarefied, the Navier-Stokes equations begin to fail and a kinetic description of the flow becomes more appropriate. The failure of the Navier-Stokes equations can be thought to take place via two different physical mechanisms: either the continuum hypothesis breaks down as a result of a finite size effect; or local equilibrium is violated due to the high rate of strain. By independently tuning the relevant linear dimension and the frequency of the oscillating body, we can experimentally observe these two different physical mechanisms. All the experimental data, however, can be collapsed using a single dimensionless scaling parameter that combines the relevant linear dimension and the frequency of the body. This proposed Knudsen number for an unsteady flow is rooted in a fundamental symmetry principle, namely Galilean invariance.
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    Internal gravity waves play a primary role in geophysical fluids: they contribute significantly to mixing in the ocean and they redistribute energy and momentum in the middle atmosphere. Until recently, most studies were focused on plane wave solutions. However, these solutions are not a satisfactory description of most geophysical manifestations of internal gravity waves, and it is now recognized that internal wave beams with a confined profile are ubiquitous in the geophysical context. We will discuss the reason for the ubiquity of wave beams in stratified fluids, related to the fact that they are solutions of the nonlinear governing equations. We will focus more specifically on situations with a constant buoyancy frequency. Moreover, in light of recent experimental and analytical studies of internal gravity beams, it is timely to discuss the two main mechanisms of instability for those beams. i) The Triadic Resonant Instability generating two secondary wave beams. ii) The streaming instability corresponding to the spontaneous generation of a mean flow.
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    We formulate a general criterion for the exact preservation of the "lake at rest" solution in general mesh-based and meshless numerical schemes for the strong form of the shallow-water equations with bottom topography. The main idea is a careful mimetic design for the spatial derivative operators in the momentum flux equation that is paired with a compatible averaging rule for the water column height arising in the bottom topography source term. We prove consistency of the mimetic difference operators analytically and demonstrate the well-balanced property numerically using finite difference and RBF-FD schemes in the one- and two-dimensional cases.
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    We propose a model for the density statistics in supersonic turbulence, which play a crucial role in star-formation and the physics of the interstellar medium (ISM). Motivated by [Hopkins, MNRAS, 430, 1880 (2013)], the model considers the density to be arranged into a collection of strong shocks of width $\sim\! \mathcal{M}^{-2}$, where $\mathcal{M}$ is the turbulent Mach number. With two physically motivated parameters, the model predicts all density statistics for $\mathcal{M}>1$ turbulence: the density probability distribution and its intermittency (deviation from log-normality), the density variance-Mach number relation, power spectra, and structure functions. For the proposed model parameters, reasonable agreement is seen between model predictions and numerical simulations, albeit within the large uncertainties associated with current simulation results. More generally, the model could provide a useful framework for more detailed analysis of future simulations and observational data. Due to the simple physical motivations for the model in terms of shocks, it is straightforward to generalize to more complex physical processes, which will be helpful in future more detailed applications to the ISM. We see good qualitative agreement between such extensions and recent simulations of non-isothermal turbulence.
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    The dynamics of interacting quantum vortices in a quasi-2D spatially nonuniform Bose-Einstein condensate is considered in hydrodynamic approximation for the case when equilibrium density of the condensate vanishes at two points of the plane, in each of them the presence of a stationary vortex of several quanta of circulation is possible. A special class of the density profiles is chosen, so that with the help of a conformal mapping of the plane onto a cylinder, analytical calculation becomes possible for the velocity field created by vortices. Equations of motion are presented in a noncanonical Hamiltonian form. The theory is generalized to the case when condensate takes form of a curved quasi-2D shell in the 3D space.