Fluid Dynamics (physics.flu-dyn)

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    Despite recent progress, laminar-turbulent coexistence in transitional planar wall-bounded shear flows is still not well understood. Contrasting with the processes by which chaotic flow inside turbulent patches is sustained at the local (minimal flow unit) scale, the mechanisms controlling the obliqueness of laminar-turbulent interfaces typically observed all along the coexistence range are still mysterious. An extension of Waleffe's approach [Phys. Fluids 9 (1997) 883--900] is used to show that, already at the local scale, drift flows breaking the problem's spanwise symmetry are generated just by slightly detuning the modes involved in the self-sustainment process. This opens perspectives for theorizing the formation of laminar-turbulent patterns.
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    An expression for the dimensionless dissipation rate was derived from the Karman-Howarth equation by asymptotic expansion of the second- and third- order structure functions in powers of the inverse Reynolds number. The implications of the time-derivative term for the assumption of local stationarity (or local equilibrium) which underpins the derivation of the Kolmogorov `4/5' law for the third-order structure function were studied. It was concluded that neglect of the time-derivative cannot be justified by reason of restriction to certain scales (the inertial range) nor to large Reynolds numbers. In principle, therefore, the hypothesis cannot be correct, although it may be a good approximation. It follows, at least in principle, that the quantitative aspects of the hypothesis of local stationarity could be tested by a comparison of the asymptotic dimensionless dissipation rate for free decay with that for the stationary case. But in practice this is complicated by the absence of an agreed evolution time for making the measurements during the decay. However, we can assess the quantitative error involved in using the hypothesis by comparing the exact asymptotic value of the dimensionless dissipation in free decay calculated on the assumption of local stationarity to the experimentally determined value (e.g. by means of direct numerical simulation), as this relationship holds for all measuring times. Should the assumption of local stationarity lead to significant error, then the `4/5' law needs to be corrected. Despite this, scale invariance in wavenumber space appears to hold in the formal limit of infinite Reynolds numbers, which implies that the `-5/3' energy spectrum does not require correction in this limit.
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    This paper presents novel insights about the influence of soluble surfactants on bubble flows obtained by Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS). Surfactants are amphiphilic compounds which accumulate at fluid interfaces and significantly modify the respective interfacial properties, influencing also the overall dynamics of the flow. With the aid of DNS local quantities like the surfactant distribution on the bubble surface can be accessed for a better understanding of the physical phenomena occurring close to the interface. The core part of the physical model consists in the description of the surfactant transport in the bulk and on the deformable interface. The solution procedure is based on an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) Interface-Tracking method. The existing methodology was enhanced to describe a wider range of physical phenomena. A subgrid-scale (SGS) model is employed in the cases where a fully resolved DNS for the species transport is not feasible due to high mesh resolution requirements and, therefore, high computational costs. After an exhaustive validation of the latest numerical developments, the DNS of single rising bubbles in contaminated solutions is compared to experimental results. The full velocity transients of the rising bubbles, especially the contaminated ones, are correctly reproduced by the DNS. The simulation results are then studied to gain a better understanding of the local bubble dynamics under the effect of soluble surfactant. One of the main insights is that the quasi-steady state of the rise velocity is reached without ad- and desorption being necessarily in local equilibrium.
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    Motivated by the relevance of edge state solutions as mediators of transition, we use direct numerical simulations to study the effect of spatially non-uniform viscosity on their energy and stability in minimal channel flows. What we seek is a theoretical support rooted in a fully non-linear framework that explains the modified threshold for transition to turbulence in flows with temperature-dependent viscosity. Consistently over a range of subcritical Reynolds numbers, we find that decreasing viscosity away from the walls weakens the streamwise streaks and the vortical structures responsible for their regeneration. The entire self-sustained cycle of the edge state is maintained on a lower kinetic energy level with a smaller driving force, compared to a flow with constant viscosity. Increasing viscosity away from the walls has the opposite effect. In both cases, the effect is proportional to the strength of the viscosity gradient. The results presented highlight a local shift in the state space of the position of the edge state relative to the laminar attractor with the consequent modulation of its basin of attraction in the proximity of the edge state and of the surrounding manifold. The implication is that the threshold for transition is reduced for perturbations evolving in the neighbourhood of the edge state in case viscosity decreases away from the walls, and vice versa.
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    We investigate fluid mediated effective interactions in a confined film geometry, between two rigid, no-slip plates, where one of the plates is mobile and subjected to a random external forcing with zero average. The fluid is assumed to be compressible and viscous, and the external surface forcing to be of small amplitude, thus enabling a linear hydrodynamic analysis. While the transverse and longitudinal hydrodynamic stresses (forces per unit area) acting on either of the plates vanish on average, they exhibit significant fluctuations that can be quantified through their equal-time, two-point correlators. For transverse (shear) stresses, the same-plate correlators on both the fixed and the mobile plates, and also the cross-plate correlator, exhibit decaying power-law behaviors as functions of the inter-plate separation with universal exponents: At small separations, the exponents are given by -1 in all cases, while at large separations the exponents are found to be larger, differing in magnitude, viz., -2 (for the same-plate correlator on the fixed plate), -4 (for the excess same-plate correlator on the mobile plate) and -3 (for the cross-plate correlator). For longitudinal (compressional) stresses, we find much weaker power-law decays with exponents -3/2 (for the excess same-plate correlator on the mobile plate) and -1 (for the cross-plate correlator) in the large inter-plate separation regime. The same-plate stress correlator on the fixed plate increases and saturates on increase of the inter-plate separation, reflecting the non-decaying nature of the longitudinal forces acting on the fixed plate. The qualitative differences between the transverse and longitudinal stress correlators stem from the distinct nature of the shear and compression modes as, for instance, the latter exhibit acoustic propagation and, hence, relatively large fluctuations across the fluid film.