Fluid Dynamics (physics.flu-dyn)

  • PDF
    We have conducted experimental measurements and numerical simulations of a precession driven flow in a cylindrical cavity. The study is dedicated to the precession dynamo experiment currently under construction at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) and aims at the evaluation of the hydrodynamic flow with respect to its ability to drive a dynamo. We focus on the strongly non-linear regime in which the flow is essentially composed of the directly forced primary Kelvin mode and higher modes in terms of standing inertial waves arising from non-linear self-interactions. We obtain an excellent agreement between experiment and simulation with regard to both, flow amplitudes and flow geometry. A peculiarity is the resonance-like emergence of an axisymmetric mode that represents a double role structure in the meridional plane. Kinematic simulations of the magnetic field evolution induced by the time-averaged flow yield dynamo action at critical magnetic Reynolds numbers around ${\rm{Rm}}^{\rm{c}}\approx 430$ which is well within the range of the planned liquid sodium experiment.
  • PDF
    It is shown that the universal steady Euler flow field, independent of boundary shape or symmetry, in a toroidal domain with fixed boundary obeys a nonlinear Beltrami equation, with the nonlinearity arising from a Boltzmann-like, velocity-dependent factor. Moreover, this is a relaxed velocity field, in the sense that it extremizes the total kinetic energy in the domain under free variations of the velocity field, constrained only by tangential velocity and vorticity boundary conditions and conservation of total fluid helicity and entropy. This is analogous to Woltjer-Taylor relaxation of plasma magnetic field to a stationary state. However, unlike the magnetic field case, attempting to derive slow, quasi-relaxed dynamics from Hamilton's action principle, with constant total fluid helicity as a constraint, fails to agree, in the static limit, with the nonlinear Beltrami solution of the Euler equations. Nevertheless, an action principle that gives a quasi-relaxed dynamics that does agree can be formulated, by introducing a potential representation of the velocity field and defining an analogue of the magnetic helicity as a new constraint. A Hamiltonian form of quasi-relaxed fluid dynamics is also given.
  • PDF
    We study the motion of an electron bubble in the zero temperature limit where neither phonons nor rotons provide a significant contribution to the drag exerted on an ion moving within the superfluid. By using the Gross-Clark model, in which a Gross-Pitaevskii equation for the superfluid wavefunction is coupled to a Schrödinger equation for the electron wavefunction, we study how vortex nucleation affects the measured drift velocity of the ion. We use parameters that give realistic values of the ratio of the radius of the bubble with respect to the healing length in superfluid $^4$He at a pressure of one bar. By performing fully 3D spatio-temporal simulations of the superfluid coupled to an electron, that is modelled within an adiabatic approximation and moving under the influence of an applied electric field, we are able to recover the key dynamics of the ion-vortex interactions that arise and the subsequent ion-vortex complexes that can form. Using the numerically computed drift velocity of the ion as a function of the applied electric field, we determine the vortex-nucleation limited mobility of the ion to recover values in reasonable agreement with measured data.
  • PDF
    Magnetorotational instability (MRI) is one of the fundamental processes in astrophysics, driving angular momentum transport and mass accretion in a wide variety of cosmic objects. Despite much theoretical/numerical and experimental efforts over the last decades, its saturation mechanism and amplitude, which sets the angular momentum transport rate, remains not well understood, especially in the limit of high resistivity, or small magnetic Prandtl numbers typical to interiors of protoplanetary disks, liquid cores of planets and liquid metals in laboratory. We investigate the nonlinear development and saturation properties of the helical magnetorotational instability (HMRI) in a magnetized Taylor-Couette flow using direct numerical simulations. From the linear theory of HMRI, it is known that the Elsasser number, or interaction parameter plays a special role for its dynamics and determines its growth rate. We show that this parameter is also important in the nonlinear problem. By increasing its value, a sudden transition from weakly nonlinear, where the system is slightly above the linear stability threshold, to turbulent regime occurs. We calculate the azimuthal and axial energy spectra corresponding to these two regimes and show that they differ qualitatively. Remarkably, the nonlinear states remain in all cases nearly axisymmetric suggesting that HMRI turbulence is quasi two-dimensional in nature. Although the contribution of non-axisymmetric modes increases moderately with the Elsasser number, their total energy remains much smaller than that of the axisymmetric ones.
  • PDF
    We construct a five-mode helical dynamo model containing three velocity and two magnetic modes and solve it analytically. This model exhibits dynamo transition via supercritical pitchfork bifurcation. We show that the critical magnetic Reynolds number for dynamo transition ($\mathrm{Rm}_c$) asymptotes to constant values for very low and very high magnetic Prandtl numbers ($\mathrm{Pm}$). Beyond dynamo transition, secondary bifurcations lead to periodic, quasi-periodic, and chaotic dynamo states as the forcing amplitude is increased and chaos appears through a quasi-periodic route.
  • PDF
    It is typically assumed that the kinetic and magnetic helicities play a crucial role in the growth of large-scale dynamo. In this paper we demonstrate that helicity is not essential for the amplification of large-scale magnetic field. For this purpose, we perform nonhelical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation, and show that the large-scale magnetic field can grow in nonhelical MHD when random external forcing is employed at scale $1/10$ the box size. The energy fluxes and shell-to-shell transfer rates computed using the numerical data show that the large-scale magnetic energy grows due to the energy transfers from the velocity field at the forcing scales.
  • PDF
    In the theory of the Navier-Stokes equations, the viscous fluid in incompressible flow is modelled as a homogeneous and dense assemblage of constituent "fluid particles" with viscous stress proportional to rate of strain. The crucial concept of fluid flow is the velocity of the particle that is accelerated by the pressure and viscous interaction around it. In this paper, by virtue of the alternative constituent "micro-finite element", we introduce a set of new intrinsic quantities, called the vortex fields, to characterise the relative orientation between elements and the feature of micro-eddies in the element, while the description of viscous interaction in fluid returns to the initial intuition that the interlayer friction is proportional to the slip strength. Such a framework enables us to reconstruct the dynamics theory of viscous fluid, in which the flowing fluid can be modelled as a finite covering of elements and consequently indicated by a space-time differential manifold that admits complex topological evolution.
  • PDF
    The KdV equation can be derived in the shallow water limit of the Euler equations. Over the last few decades, this equation has been extended to include higher order effects. Although this equation has only one conservation law, exact periodic and solitonic solutions exist. Khare and Saxena \citeKhSa,KhSa14,KhSa15 demonstrated the possibility of generating new exact solutions by combining known ones for several fundamental equations (e.g., Korteweg - de Vries, Nonlinear Schrödinger). Here we find that this construction can be repeated for higher order, non-integrable extensions of these equations. Contrary to many statements in the literature, there seems to be no correlation between integrability and the number of nonlinear one variable wave solutions.
  • PDF
    In this paper, we construct the Boltzmann equation with respect to orthonormal vielbein fields in conservative form. This formalism allows the use of arbitrary coordinate systems to describe the space geometry, as well as of an adapted coordinate system in the momentum space, which is linked to the physical space through the use of vielbeins. Taking advantage of the conservative form, we derive the macroscopic equations in a covariant tensor notation, as well as the Chapman-Enskog expansion in the Bhatnaghar-Gross-Krook (BGK) approximation for the collision term. We highlight that in this formalism, the component of the momentum which is perpendicular to some curved boundary can be isolated as a separate momentum coordinate, for which the half-range Gauss-Hermite quadrature can be applied. We illustrate the application of this formalism for the simulation of the circular Couette flow between rotating coaxial cylinders using lattice Boltzmann models based on half-range Gauss-Hermite quadratures. We employ the fifth order WENO and third-order TVD Runge-Kutta numerical methods for the advection and time-stepping, respectively.
  • PDF
    In the context of stochastic two-phase flow in porous media, we introduce a novel and efficient method to estimate the probability distribution of the wetting saturation field under uncertain rock properties in highly heterogeneous porous systems, where streamline patterns are dominated by permeability heterogeneity, and for slow displacement processes (viscosity ratio close to unity). Our method, referred to as the frozen streamline distribution method (FROST), is based on a physical understanding of the stochastic problem. Indeed, we identify key random fields that guide the wetting saturation variability, namely fluid particle times of flight and injection times. By comparing saturation statistics against full-physics Monte Carlo simulations, we illustrate how this simple, yet accurate FROST method performs under the preliminary approximation of frozen streamlines. Further, we inspect the performance of an accelerated FROST variant that relies on a simplification about injection time statistics. Finally, we introduce how quantiles of saturation can be efficiently computed within the FROST framework, hence leading to robust uncertainty assessment.
  • PDF
    Transforming a laser beam into a mass flow has been a challenge both scientifically and technologically. Here we report the discovery of a new optofluidics principle and demonstrate the generation of a steady-state water flow by a pulsed laser beam through a glass window. In order to generate a flow or stream in the same path as the refracted laser beam in pure water from an arbitrary spot on the window, we first fill a glass cuvette with an aqueous solution of Au nanoparticles. A flow will emerge from the focused laser spot on the window after the laser is turned on for a few to tens of minutes, the flow remains after the colloidal solution is completely replaced by pure water. Microscopically, this transformation is made possible by an underlying plasmonic nanoparticle-decorated cavity which is self-fabricated on the glass by nanoparticle-assisted laser etching and exhibits size and shape uniquely tailored to the incident beam profile. Hydrophone signals indicate that the flow is driven via acoustic streaming by a long-lasting ultrasound wave that is resonantly generated by the laser and the cavity through the photoacoustic effect. The principle of this light-driven flow via ultrasound, i.e. photoacoustic streaming by coupling photoacoustics to acoustic streaming, is general and can be applied to any liquids, opening up new research and applications in optofluidics as well as traditional photoacoustics and acoustic streaming.
  • PDF
    Turbulence remains an unsolved multidisciplinary science problem. As one of the most well-known examples in turbulent flows, knowledge of the logarithmic mean velocity profile (MVP), so called the log law of the wall, plays an important role everywhere turbulent flow meets the solid wall, such as fluids in any kind of channels, skin friction of all types of transportations, the atmospheric wind on a planetary ground, and the oceanic current on the seabed. However, the mechanism of how this log-law MVP is formed under the multiscale nature of turbulent shears remains one of the greatest interests of turbulence puzzles. To untangle the multiscale coupling of turbulent shear stresses, we explore for a known fundamental tool in physics. Here we present how to reproduce the log-law MVP with the even harmonic modes of fixed-end standing waves. We find that when these harmonic waves of same magnitude are considered as the multiscale turbulent shear stresses, the wave envelope of their superposition simulates the mean shear stress profile of the wall-bounded flow. It implies that the log-law MVP is not expectedly related to the turbulent scales in the inertial subrange associated with the Kolmogorov energy cascade, revealing the dissipative nature of all scales involved. The MVP with reduced harmonic modes also shows promising connection to the understanding of flow transition to turbulence. The finding here suggests the simple harmonic waves as good agents to help unravel the complex turbulent dynamics in wall-bounded flow.
  • PDF
    I describe a method for computer algebra that helps with laborious calculations typically encountered in theoretical microhydrodynamics. The program mimics how humans calculate by matching patterns and making replacements according to the rules of algebra and calculus. This note gives an overview and walks through an example, while the accompanying code repository contains the implementation details, a tutorial, and more examples. The code repository is attached as supplementary material to this note, and maintained at https://github.com/jeinarsson/matte
  • PDF
    We present a method for identifying the coherent structures associated with individual Lagrangian flow trajectories even where only sparse particle trajectory data is available. The method, based on techniques in spectral graph theory, uses the Coherent Structure Coloring vector and associated eigenvectors to analyze the distance in higher-dimensional eigenspace between a selected reference trajectory and other tracer trajectories in the flow. By analyzing this distance metric in a hierarchical clustering, the coherent structure of which the reference particle is a member can be identified. This algorithm is proven successful in identifying coherent structures of varying complexities in canonical unsteady flows. Additionally, the method is able to assess the relative coherence of the associated structure in comparison to the surrounding flow. Although the method is demonstrated here in the context of fluid flow kinematics, the generality of the approach allows for its potential application to other unsupervised clustering problems in dynamical systems such as neuronal activity, gene expression, or social networks.
  • PDF
    One of the varieties of pores, often found in natural or artificial building materials, are the so-called blind pores of dead-end or saccate type. Three-dimensional model of such kind of pore has been developed in this work. This model has been used for simulation of water vapor interaction with individual pore by molecular dynamics in combination with the diffusion equation method. Special investigations have been done to find dependencies between thermostats implementations and conservation of thermodynamic and statistical values of water vapor - pore system. The two types of evolution of water-pore system have been investigated: drying and wetting of the pore. Full research of diffusion coefficient, diffusion velocity and other diffusion parameters has been made.