Fluid Dynamics (physics.flu-dyn)

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    A variable-coefficient forced Korteweg-de Vries equation with spacial inhomogeneity is investigated in this paper. Under constraints, this equation is transformed into its bilinear form, and multi-soliton solutions are derived. Effects of spacial inhomogeneity for soliton velocity, width and background are discussed. Nonlinear tunneling for this equation is presented, where the soliton amplitude can be amplified or compressed. Our results might be useful for the relevant problems in fluids and plasmas.
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    The validity of the anelastic approximation has recently been questioned in the regime of rapidly-rotating compressible convection in low Prandtl number fluids (Calkins et al. 2015). Given the broad usage and the high computational efficiency of sound-proof approaches in this astrophysically relevant regime, this paper clarifies the conditions for a safe application. The potential of the alternative pseudo-incompressible ap- proximation is investigated, which in contrast to the anelastic approximation is shown to never break down for predicting the point of marginal stability. Its accuracy, however, decreases as the temporal derivative of pressure term in the continuity equation becomes non-negligible. The magnitude of this pressure term is found to be controlled by the phase Mach number that we introduce as the ratio of the phase velocity (corresponding to the oscillatory instability) to the local sound speed. We find that although the anelastic approximation for compressible convection in the rapidly rotating low Prandtl number regime is inaccurate at marginal stability, it does not show unphysical behavior for supercritical convection. Growth rates com- puted with the linearized anelastic equations converge toward the corresponding fully compressible values as the Rayleigh number increases. Likewise, our fully nonlinear turbulent simulations, produced with our fully compressible and anelastic models and carried out in the regime in which Calkins et al. (2015) suspect the anelastic approximation to break down, show good agreement.
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    The effect of turbulence on the mass and heat transfer between small heavy inertial particles (HIP) and an embedding fluid is studied. Two effects are identified. The first effect is due to the relative velocity between the fluid and the particles, and a model for the relative velocity is presented. The second effect is due to the clustering of particles, where the mass transfer rate is inhibited due to the rapid depletion of the consumed species inside the dense particle clusters. This last effect is relevant for large Damkohler numbers and it may totally control the mass transfer rate for Damkohler numbers larger than unity. A model that describes how this effect should be incorporated into existing particle simulation tools is presented.
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    The transient electroosmotic flow of Maxwell fluid in a rotating microchannel is investigated both analytically and numerically. We bring out the complex dynamics of the flow during the transience due to the combination of rotation and rheological effects. We show the regimes of operation under which our analysis holds the most significance. We also shed some light on the volumetric flow rate characteristics as dictated by the underlying flow physics. Analytical solution compares well with the numerical solution. We believe that the results from the present study could potentially have far reaching applications in bio-fluidic microsystems where fluids such as blood, mucus and saliva may be involved.
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    Dynamics of active or self-propulsive Brownian particles in nonequilibrium status, has recently attracted great interest in many fields including biological entities and artificial micro/nanoscopic motors6. Understanding of their dynamics can provide insight into the statistical properties of biological and physical systems far from equilibrium. Generally, active Brownian particles can involve either translational or rotational motion. Here, we report the translational dynamics of photon-activated gold nanoparticles (NPs) in liquid cell imaged by four-dimensional electron microscopy (4D-EM). Under excitation of femtosecond (fs)-laser pulses, we observed that those Brownian NPs exhibit a superfast diffusive behavior with a diffusion constant four to five orders of magnitude greater than that in absence of laser excitation. The measured diffusion constant was found to follow a power-law dependence on the fs-laser fluence. Such superfast diffusion is induced by strong random driving forces arising from rapid nucleation, expansion and collapse of photoinduced nanobubbles (NBs) near the NP surface. In contrast, the motion of the NPs exhibit superfast ballistic translation at a short time scale down to nanoseconds (ns). Combining with physical model simulation, this study reveals a NB-propulsion mechanism for the self-propulsive motion, providing physical insights for better design of light-activated artificial micro/nanomotors.
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    This study aims to make use of two concepts in the field of aeroacoustics; an analogy with relativity, and Geometric Algebra. The analogy with relativity has been investigated in physics and cosmology, but less has been done to use this work in the field of aeroacoustics. Despite being successfully applied to a variety of fields, Geometric Algebra has yet to be applied to acoustics. Our aim is to apply these concepts first to a simple problem in aeroacoustics, sound propagation in uniform flow, and the more general problem of acoustic propagation in non-uniform flows. By using Geometric Algebra we are able to provide a simple geometric interpretation to a transformation commonly used to solve for sound fields in uniform flow. We are then able to extend this concept to an acoustic space-time applicable to irrotational, barotropic background flows. This geometrical framework is used to naturally derive the requirements that must be satisfied by the background flow in order for us to be able to solve for sound propagation in the non-uniform flow using the simple wave equation. We show that this is not possible in the most general situation, and provide an explicit expression that must be satisfied for the transformation to exist. We show that this requirement is automatically satisfied if the background flow is incompressible or uniform, and for both these cases derive an explicit transformation. In addition to a new physical interpretation for the transformation, we show that unlike previous investigations, our work is applicable to any frequency.