Classical Physics (physics.class-ph)

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    Using some rigorous results by Wiener [(1930). \em Acta Math. \bf 30, 118-242] on the Fourier integral of a bounded function and the condition that small-angle scattering intensities of amorphous samples are almost everywhere continuous, we obtain the conditions that must be obeyed by a function $\eta(\br)$ for this may be considered a physical scattering density fluctuation. It turns out that these conditions can be recast in the form that the $V\to\infty$ limit of the modulus of the Fourier transform of $\eta(\br)$, evaluated over a cubic box of volume $V$ and divided by $\sqrt{V}$, exists and that its square obeys the Porod invariant relation. Some examples of one-dimensional scattering density functions, obeying the aforesaid condition, are also numerically illustrated.
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    We investigate how the theory of self-adjoint differential equations alone can be used to provide a satisfactory solution of the inverse vatiational problem. For the discrete system, the self-adjoint form of the Newtonian equation allows one to find an explicitly time-dependent Lagrangian representation. On the other hand, the same Newtonian equation in conjunction with its adjoint forms a natural basis to construct an explicitly time-independent analytic representation of the system. This approach when applied to the equation of damped harmonic oscillator help one disclose the mathematical origin of the Bateman image equation. We have made use of a continuum analog of the same approach to find the Lagrangian or analytic representation of nonlinear evolution equations.
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    We consider non-stationary oscillations of an infinite string with time-varying tension. The string lies on the Winkler foundation with a point inhomogeneity (a concentrated spring with negative stiffness). In such a system with constant parameters (the string tension), under certain conditions a trapped mode of oscillation exists and is unique. Therefore, applying a non-stationary external excitation to this system can lead to the emergence of the string oscillations localized near the inhomogeneity. We provide an analytical description of non-stationary localized oscillations of the string with slowly time-varying tension using the asymptotic procedure based on successive application of two asymptotic methods, namely the method of stationary phase and the method of multiple scales. The obtained analytical results were verified by independent numerical calculations based on the finite difference method. The applicability of the analytical formulas was demonstrated for various types of external excitation and laws governing the varying tension. In particular, we have shown that in the case when the trapped mode frequency approaches zero, localized low-frequency oscillations with increasing amplitude precede the localized string buckling. The dependence of the amplitude of such oscillations on its frequency is more complicated in comparison with the case of a one degree of freedom system with time-varying stiffness.
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    An interesting phenomenon that occurs in projectile motion, the "coming and going", is analyzed considering linear air resistance force. By performing both approximate and numerical analysis, it is showed how a determined critical angle and an interesting geometrical property of projectiles can change due to variation on the linear air resistance coefficient.
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    A plane problem is considered for a sectioned 1D elastic body, like a beam or a plate, which is in contact with a structure or a 2D medium both homogeneous in the longitudinal coordinate. Under internal forces, the sections can rotate and transversely displace relative to each other. An analytical technique is suggested where the structural discontinuities are considered as generalized strains in the continuous body. This approach eliminates the need for examining separate sections with subsequent conjugation. Only conditions related to the discontinuities should be satisfied, while the continuity in other respects is preserved automatically. No obstacle remains for the continuous Fourier transform. For a uniform partitioning, the discrete transform is used together with the continuous one. The technique is demonstrated by obtaining the Floquet wave dispersive relations with their dependence upon interface stiffness. To this end, we briefly consider the wave in the sectioned beam on Winkler's foundation, the gravity wave in a plate (also sectioned) on deep water and the Floquet-Rayleigh wave in such a plate on an elastic half-space.
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    Contact dynamics (CD) is a powerful method to solve the dynamics of large systems of colliding rigid bodies. CD can be computationally more efficient than classical penalty-based discrete element methods (DEM) for simulating contact between stiff materials such as rock, glass, or engineering metals. However, by idealizing bodies as perfectly rigid, contact forces computed by CD can be non-unique due to indeterminacy in the contact network, which is a common occurence in dense granular flows. We propose a CD method that is designed to identify only the unique set of contact forces that would be predicted by a soft particle method, such as DEM, in the limit of large stiffness. The method involves applying an elastic compatibility condition to the contact forces, which maintains no-penetration constraints but filters out force distributions that could not have arisen from stiff elastic contacts. The method can be used as a post-processing step that could be integrated into existing CD codes with minimal effort. We demonstrate its efficacy in a variety of indeterminate problems, including some involving multiple materials, non-spherical shapes, and nonlinear contact constitutive laws.