Chemical Physics (physics.chem-ph)

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    An experimental study was carried out to investigate the existence of a critical layer thickness in nanolayer coextrusion, under which no continuous layer is observed. Polymer films containing thousands of layers of alternating polymers with individual layer thicknesses below 100 nm have been prepared by coextrusion through a series of layer multiplying elements. Different films composed of alternating layers of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and polystyrene (PS) were fabricated with the aim to reach individual layer thicknesses as small as possible, varying the number of layers, the mass composition of both components and the final total thickness of the film. Films were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and a statistical analysis was used to determine the distribution in layer thicknesses and the continuity of layers. For the PS/PMMA nanolayered systems, results point out the existence of a critical layer thickness around 10 nm, below which the layers break up. This critical layer thickness is reached regardless of the processing route, suggesting it might be dependent only on material characteristics but not on process parameters. We propose this breakup phenomenon is due to small interfacial perturbations that are amplified by (van der Waals) disjoining forces.
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    Mixed quantum-classical dynamics simulations show that intersystem crossing between singlet and triplet states in SO$_2$ and in nucleobases takes place on an ultrafast timescale (few 100~fs), directly competing with internal conversion.
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    This Chapter is devoted to unravel the relaxation processes taking place after photoexcitation of isolated DNA/RNA nucleobases in gas phase from a time-dependent perspective. To this aim, several methods are at hand, ranging from full quantum dynamics to various flavours of semiclassical or ab initio molecular dynamics, each with its advantages and its limitations. As this contribution shows, the most common approach employed up-to-date to learn about the deactivation of nucleobases in gas phase is a combination of the Tully surface hopping algorithm with on-the-fly CASSCF calculations. Different methods or, even more dramatically, different electronic structure methods can provide different dynamics. A comprehensive review of the different mechanisms suggested for each nucleobase is provided and compared to available experimental time scales. The results are discussed in a general context involving the effects of the different applied electronic structure and dynamics methods. Mechanistic similarities and differences between the two groups of nucleobases---the purine derivatives (adenine and guanine) and the pyrimidine derivatives (thymine, uracil, and cytosine)---are elucidated. Finally, a perspective on the future of dynamics simulations in the context of nucleobase relaxation is given.
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    Photoionization using attosecond pulses can lead to the formation of coherent superpositions of the electronic states of the parent ion. However, ultrafast electron ejection triggers not only electronic but also nuclear dynamics---leading to electronic decoherence, which is typically neglected on time scales up to tens of femtoseconds. We propose a full quantum-dynamical treatment of nuclear motion in an adiabatic framework, where nuclear wavepackets move on adiabatic potential energy surfaces expanded up to second order at the Franck-Condon point. We show that electronic decoherence is caused by the interplay of a large number of nuclear degrees of freedom and by the relative topology of the potential energy surfaces. Application to $\mathrm{H_2O}$, paraxylene, and phenylalanine shows that an initially coherent state evolves to an electronically mixed state within just a few femtoseconds. In these examples the fast vibrations involving hydrogen atoms do not affect electronic coherence at short times. Conversely, vibrational modes involving the whole molecular skeleton, which are slow in the ground electronic state, quickly destroy it upon photoionization.
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    Intersystem crossing is a radiationless process that can take place in a molecule irradiated by UV-Vis light, thereby playing an important role in many environmental, biological and technological processes. This paper reviews different methods to describe intersystem crossing dynamics, paying attention to semiclassical trajectory theories, which are especially interesting because they can be applied to large systems with many degrees of freedom. In particular, a general trajectory surface hopping methodology recently developed by the authors, which is able to include non-adiabatic and spin-orbit couplings in excited-state dynamics simulations, is explained in detail. This method, termed SHARC, can in principle include any arbitrary coupling, what makes it generally applicable to photophysical and photochemical problems, also those including explicit laser fields. A step-by-step derivation of the main equations of motion employed in surface hopping based on the fewest-switches method of Tully, adapted for the inclusion of spin-orbit interactions, is provided. Special emphasis is put on describing the different possible choices of the electronic bases in which spin-orbit can be included in surface hopping, highlighting the advantages and inconsistencies of the different approaches.
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    Variational approaches for the calculation of vibrational wave functions and energies are a natural route to obtain highly accurate results with controllable errors. However, the unfavorable scaling and the resulting high computational cost of standard variational approaches limit their application to small molecules with only few vibrational modes. Here, we demonstrate how the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) can be exploited to optimize vibrational wave functions (vDMRG) expressed as matrix product states. We study the convergence of these calculations with respect to the size of the local basis of each mode, the number of renormalized block states, and the number of DMRG sweeps required. We demonstrate the high accuracy achieved by vDMRG for small molecules that were intensively studied in the literature. We then proceed to show that the complete fingerprint region of the sarcosyn-glycin dipeptide can be calculated with vDMRG.
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    The efficiency of solar energy harvesting systems is largely determined by their ability to transfer excitations from the antenna to the energy trapping center before recombination. Dark state protection achieved by coherent coupling between subunits in the antenna structure has been shown to significantly reduce radiative recombination and enhance the efficiency of energy trapping. Since the dark states cannot be populated by optical transitions from the ground, they are usually accessed through phononic relaxation from the bright state. In this study we explore a novel way of connecting the dark states and the bright states by optical transitions. In a ring-like chromophore system inspired by the natural photosynthetic antenna, the single-excitation bright state can be connected to the lowest energy single-excitation dark state optically through certain double-excitation states. We call such double-excitation states the ferry states and show that they are the result of accidental degeneracy between two categories of the double-excitation states. We then mathematically prove that the ferry states are only available when N the number of subunits on the ring satisfies N=4n+2 (n being an integer). Numerical calculations confirm the effect of having such ferry states by producing a significant energy transfer power spike at N=6 as compared to smaller N's when phononic relaxation is turned off. The proposed mathematical theory for the ferry states is not restricted to the particular numerical model and system but opens the possibility of new applications in any coherent optical system that adopts a ring structured chromophore arrangement.

Recent comments

Jarrod McClean Apr 02 2014 18:33 UTC

Ryan is exactly correct. The method would work with any of the clock constructions, however we decided that the machinery they developed to make sure it was implementable in qubits was unnecessary overhead for a classical implementation, where having a qudit with large d does not present a great ch

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Ryan Babbush Mar 23 2014 19:18 UTC

I'll let Jarrod correct me if he disagrees but I think the point Jarrod is making is that the original clocks of Feynman and Kitaev were designed with physical implementation in mind whereas this proposal is for a classical algorithm and as such, should not be measured by the same considerations (su

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Omar Shehab Mar 22 2014 04:06 UTC

Jarrod,

Would there be any issue if you had used the original Feynman's clock or Kitaev's clock for simulating quantum systems classically?

Omar Shehab Mar 22 2014 00:28 UTC

Thank you for your quick reply. In that case, as long as we are using qubits for your scheme we should be good. Having said that I am afraid it may jeopardize the local structure recommended by Feynman to some extent.

Jarrod McClean Mar 21 2014 14:16 UTC

Thank you for your interest in our paper! The reason for the apparent discrepancy is that our paper is designed for classical simulation of quantum systems using ideas (namely Feynman's Clock) from quantum computation. When performing the simulation on a classical computer, the underlying qubit st

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Omar Shehab Mar 21 2014 00:14 UTC

In equation 7 of the paper, the clock register is different from Feynman's original proposal. According to this paper, for a four clock steps quantum circuit, the sequence of the state of the clock register will be $|00\rangle \to |01\rangle \to |10\rangle \to |11\rangle$. It infers that we will nee

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Sergey Filippov Aug 02 2013 12:17 UTC

Physicists may be also interested in a realistic proposal of DFS computation with solid-state qubits: Phys. Lett. A 374, 3285 (2010), arXiv:0903.1056 [quant-ph]