Chemical Physics (physics.chem-ph)

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    We present a comprehensive benchmark study of the adsorption energy of a single water molecule on the (001) LiH surface using periodic coupled cluster and quantum Monte Carlo theories. We benchmark and compare different implementations of quantum chemical wave function based theories in order to verify the reliability of the predicted adsorption energies and the employed approximations. Furthermore we compare the predicted adsorption energies to those obtained employing widely-used van der Waals density-functionals. Our findings show that quantum chemical approaches are becoming a robust and reliable tool for condensed phase electronic structure calculations, providing an additional tool that can also help in potentially improving currently available van der Waals density-functionals.
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    We develop a new scheme for determining molecular partial atomic charges (PACs) with external electrostatic potential (ESP) closely mimicking that of the molecule. The PACs are the "minimal corrections" to a reference-set of PACs necessary for reproducing exactly the tensor components of the Cartesian zero- first- and second- molecular electrostatic multipoles. We evaluate the quality of ESP reproduction when "minimally correcting" (MC) Mulliken, Hirshfeld or iterated-Hirshfeld reference PACs. In all these cases the MC-PACs significantly improve the ESP while preserving the reference PACs' adherence to point- and rotational-translational- symmetries of the molecule. When iterative-Hirshfeld PACs are used as reference the MC-PACs yield ESPs of comparable quality to those of the ChElPG charge fitting method.

Recent comments

Jarrod McClean Apr 02 2014 18:33 UTC

Ryan is exactly correct. The method would work with any of the clock constructions, however we decided that the machinery they developed to make sure it was implementable in qubits was unnecessary overhead for a classical implementation, where having a qudit with large d does not present a great ch

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Ryan Babbush Mar 23 2014 19:18 UTC

I'll let Jarrod correct me if he disagrees but I think the point Jarrod is making is that the original clocks of Feynman and Kitaev were designed with physical implementation in mind whereas this proposal is for a classical algorithm and as such, should not be measured by the same considerations (su

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Omar Shehab Mar 22 2014 04:06 UTC

Jarrod,

Would there be any issue if you had used the original Feynman's clock or Kitaev's clock for simulating quantum systems classically?

Omar Shehab Mar 22 2014 00:28 UTC

Thank you for your quick reply. In that case, as long as we are using qubits for your scheme we should be good. Having said that I am afraid it may jeopardize the local structure recommended by Feynman to some extent.

Jarrod McClean Mar 21 2014 14:16 UTC

Thank you for your interest in our paper! The reason for the apparent discrepancy is that our paper is designed for classical simulation of quantum systems using ideas (namely Feynman's Clock) from quantum computation. When performing the simulation on a classical computer, the underlying qubit st

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Omar Shehab Mar 21 2014 00:14 UTC

In equation 7 of the paper, the clock register is different from Feynman's original proposal. According to this paper, for a four clock steps quantum circuit, the sequence of the state of the clock register will be $|00\rangle \to |01\rangle \to |10\rangle \to |11\rangle$. It infers that we will nee

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Sergey Filippov Aug 02 2013 12:17 UTC

Physicists may be also interested in a realistic proposal of DFS computation with solid-state qubits: Phys. Lett. A 374, 3285 (2010), arXiv:0903.1056 [quant-ph]