Biological Physics (physics.bio-ph)

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    Recently, a new neutron spectroscopy for the dynamics in complex (bio-) systems has been proposed [A. Benedetto, and G. J. Kearley, Sci. Rep. 6, 34266, (2016)]. This spectroscopy is ideal where only the overall relaxation time in a parameterless way is required, for example in complex systems, because only the elastic-scattering intensity as a function of the energy resolution is required. This has been termed "Elastic Scattering Spectroscopy" (ESS). It is based on the inflection points in the elastic-scattering intensity at the energy-resolution value corresponding to the overall system relaxation-time. A Constant wavelength (CW) option, more suitable for reactor sources, and the time-of-flight (TOF) option, more suitable for spallation sources, have already been proposed, and here we examine the concept of a third option based on neutron spin-echo (NSE), called ESS-NSE. In principle, this consists of simply measuring depolarisation at the relatively-intense elastic echo-condition, as a function of resolution, with the basic set-up being similar to standard spin-echo. In its basic set-up, ESS spin-echo can access 5 orders of magnitude in time from nanoseconds to tens of picoseconds, reaching slower relaxation processes than the CW and TOF options recently presented. However, spatial focussing is important for the small sample-sizes of biological systems, so we also explore how the fields may be shaped to enable a small neutron beam to be focussed on the sample.
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    Revealing the structure of complex biological macromolecules, such as proteins, is an essential step for understanding the chemical mechanisms that determine the diversity of their functions. Synchrotron based x-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy have made major contributions in determining thousands of protein structures even from micro-sized crystals. They suffer from some limitations that have not been overcome, such as radiation damage, the natural inability to crystallize of a number of proteins and experimental conditions for structure determination that are incompatible with the physiological environment. Today the ultrashort and ultra-bright pulses of X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) have made attainable the dream to determine protein structure before radiation damage starts to destroy the samples. However, the signal-to-noise ratio remains a great challenge to obtain usable diffraction patterns from a single protein molecule. We describe here a new methodology that should overcome the signal and protein crystallization limits. Using a multidisciplinary approach, we propose to create a two dimensional protein array with defined orientation attached on a self-assembled-monolayer. We develop a literature-based, flexible toolbox capable of assembling different proteins on a functionalized surface while keeping them under physiological conditions during the experiment, using a water-confining graphene cover.
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    Cytosine methylation has been found to play a crucial role in various biological processes, including a number of human diseases. The detection of this small modification remains challenging. In this work, we computationally explore the possibility of detecting methylated DNA strands through direct electrical conductance measurements. Using density functional theory and the Landauer-Buttiker method, we study the electronic properties and charge transport through an eight base-pair methylated DNA strand and its native counterpart. We first analyze the effect of cytosine methylation on the tight-binding parameters of two DNA strands and then model the transmission of the electrons and conductance through the strands both with and without decoherence. We find that the main difference of the tight-binding parameters between the native DNA and the methylated DNA lies in the on-site energies of (methylated) cytosine bases. The intra- and inter- strand hopping integrals between two nearest neighboring guanine base and (methylated) cytosine base also change with the addition of the methyl groups. Our calculations show that in the phase-coherent limit, the transmission of the methylated strand is close to the native strand when the energy is nearby the highest occupied molecular orbital level and larger than the native strand by 5 times in the bandgap. The trend in transmission also holds in the presence of the decoherence with the same rate. The lower conductance for the methylated strand in the experiment is suggested to be caused by the more stable structure due to the introduction of the methyl groups. We also study the role of the exchangecorrelation functional and the effect of contact coupling by choosing coupling strengths ranging from weak to strong coupling limit.
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    Precise localization of nanoparticles within a cell is crucial to the understanding of cell-particle interactions and has broad applications in nanomedicine. Here, we report a proof-of-principle experiment for imaging individual functionalized nanoparticles within a mammalian cell by correlative microscopy. Using a chemically-fixed, HeLa cell labeled with fluorescent core-shell nanoparticles as a model system, we implemented a graphene-oxide layer as a substrate to significantly reduce background scattering. We identified cellular features of interest by fluorescence microscopy, followed by scanning transmission X-ray tomography to localize the particles in 3D, and ptychographic coherent diffractive imaging of the fine features in the region at high resolution. By tuning the X-ray energy to the Fe L-edge, we demonstrated sensitive detection of nanoparticles composed of a 22 nm magnetic Fe3O4 core encased by a 25-nm-thick fluorescent silica (SiO2) shell. These fluorescent core-shell nanoparticles act as landmarks and offer clarity in a cellular context. Our correlative microscopy results confirmed a subset of particles to be fully internalized, and high-contrast ptychographic images showed two oxidation states of individual nanoparticles with a resolution of ~16.5 nm. The ability to precisely localize individual fluorescent nanoparticles within mammalian cells will expand our understanding of the structure/function relationships for functionalized nanoparticles.