Biological Physics (physics.bio-ph)

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    Important cellular processes such as migration, differentiation, and development often rely on precise timing. Yet, the molecular machinery that regulates timing is inherently noisy. How do cells achieve precise timing with noisy components? We investigate this question using a first-passage-time approach, for an event triggered by a molecule that crosses an abundance threshold and that is regulated by either an accumulating activator or a diminishing repressor. We find that the optimal strategy corresponds to a nonlinear increase in the amount of the target molecule over time. Optimality arises from a tradeoff between minimizing the extrinsic timing noise of the regulator, and minimizing the intrinsic timing noise of the target molecule itself. Although either activation or repression outperforms an unregulated strategy, when we consider the effects of cell division, we find that repression outperforms activation if division occurs late in the process. Our results explain the nonlinear increase and low noise of mig-1 gene expression in migrating neuroblast cells during Caenorhabditis elegans development, and suggest that mig-1 regulation is dominated by repression for maximal temporal precision. These findings suggest that dynamic regulation may be a simple and powerful strategy for precise cellular timing.
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    Nanoscale membrane assemblies of sphingolipids, cholesterol, and certain proteins, also known as lipid rafts, play a crucial role in facilitating a broad range of important cell functions. Whereas on living cell membranes lipid rafts have been postulated to have nanoscopic dimensions and to be highly transient, the existence of a similar type of dynamic nanodomains in multicomponent lipid bilayers has been questioned. Here, we perform fluorescence correlation spectroscopy on planar plasmonic antenna arrays with different nanogap sizes to assess the dynamic nanoscale organization of mimetic biological membranes. Our approach takes advantage of the highly enhanced and confined excitation light provided by the nanoantennas together with their outstanding planarity to investigate membrane regions as small as 10 nm in size with microsecond time resolution. Our diffusion data are consistent with the coexistence of transient nanoscopic domains in both the liquid-ordered and the liquid-disordered microscopic phases of multicomponent lipid bilayers. These nanodomains have characteristic residence times between 30 and 150 \mus and sizes around 10 nm, as inferred from the diffusion data. Thus, although microscale phase separation occurs on mimetic membranes, nanoscopic domains also coexist, suggesting that these transient assemblies might be similar to those occurring in living cells, which in the absence of raft-stabilizing proteins are poised to be short-lived. Importantly, our work underscores the high potential of photonic nanoantennas to interrogate the nanoscale heterogeneity of native biological membranes with ultrahigh spatiotemporal resolution.
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    A systematic asymptotic study is conducted for the dynamic Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) system, that describes the transport of ions. One intriguing feature of this system is the presence of a thin boundary/Debye layer, and this presents significant challenges on numerical computation and on deriving macroscopic continuum models for cellular structures from microscopic description. This work mainly focuses on the one-dimensional system, including the general multi-ion case. We manage to derive an electro-neutral (EN) system for the bulk region, with a variety of effective boundary conditions reduced from original ones. Then, this EN system can be solved directly and efficiently without calculating the solution in boundary layer. The derivation is based on matched asymptotics, and the key idea is to bring back some higher order contributions into effective boundary conditions. For flux boundary conditions, these effective conditions are physically incorrect to omit such contributions, which account for accumulation of ions in boundary layer; while for Dirichlet boundary conditions, they can be considered as generalization of continuity of electrochemical potential. The validity of the EN system is verified by a number of numerical examples. Particularly, we have derived an EN model for neuronal axon by combining with the Hodgkin-Huxley model, and demonstrated the phenomenon of action potential. The computational time is significantly reduced, since the it needs less mesh points and allows relatively large time step.
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    The present work reports about the dynamics of a collection of randomly distributed, and randomly oriented, oscillators in 3D space, coupled by an interaction potential falling as $1/r^3$, where r stands for the inter-particle distance. This model schematically represents a collection of identical biomolecules, coherently vibrating at some common frequency, coupled with a $1/r^3$ potential stemming from the electrodynamic interaction between oscillating dipoles. The oscillating dipole moment of each molecule being a direct consequence of its coherent (collective) vibration. By changing the average distance among the molecules, neat and substantial changes in the power spectrum of the time variation of a collective observable are found. As the average intermolecular distance can be varied by changing the concentration of the solvated molecules, and as the collective variable investigated is proportional to the projection of the total dipole moment of the model biomolecules on a coordinate plane, we have found a prospective experimental strategy of spectroscopic kind to check whether the mentioned intermolecular electrodynamic interactions can be strong enough to be detectable, and thus to be of possible relevance to biology.