Biological Physics (physics.bio-ph)

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    Nanoscopic protein machines can store and manipulate information. We show that it happens if their intramolecular stochastic dynamics of conformational transitions enable performing the work in many randomly selected ways. A sample model of such dynamics, specified by a critical complex network, is investigated by computer simulations. For this model, the generalized fluctuation theorem is proven to be held with a possible entropy reduction at the expense of information creation. Information creation and storage takes place in the transient, nonergodic stages of dynamics before completing the free energy transduction cycle. From the biological perspective, the suppositions could be of especial importance that (1) a partial compensation of entropy production by information creation is the reason for most protein machines to operate as dimers or higher organized assemblies and (2) nonergodicity is essential for transcription factors in search for the target on DNA. From a broader physical perspective, it is worth emphasizing the guess that, similarly as work and heat are changes in energy, information could be considered as a change in fluctuating organization, which is also an adequately defined thermodynamic function of state.
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    We explore a model of metapopulation genetics which is based on a more ecologically motivated approach than is frequently used in population genetics. The size of the population is regulated by competition between individuals, rather than by artificially imposing a fixed population size. The increased complexity of the model is managed by employing techniques often used in the physical sciences, namely exploiting time-scale separation to eliminate fast variables and then constructing an effective model from the slow modes. Remarkably, an initial model with 2$\mathcal{D}$ variables, where $\mathcal{D}$ is the number of islands in the metapopulation, can be reduced to a model with a single variable. We analyze this effective model and show that the predictions for the probability of fixation of the alleles and the mean time to fixation agree well with those found from numerical simulations of the original model.
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    In this work, we develop a two-component coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) model for simulating the erythrocyte membrane. This proposed model possesses the key feature of combing the lipid bilayer and the erythrocyte cytoskeleton, thus showing both the fluidic behavior of the lipid bilayer and elastic properties of the erythrocyte cytoskeleton. The proposed model facilitates simulations that span large length-scales (~ micrometer) and time-scales (~ ms). By tuning the interaction potential parameters, diffusivity and bending rigidity of the membrane model can be controlled. In the study of the membrane under shearing, we find that in low shear strain rate, the developed shear stress is mainly due to the spectrin network, while the viscosity of the lipid bilayer contributes to the resulting shear stress at higher strain rates. In addition, the effects of the reduction of the spectrin network connectivity on the shear modulus of the membrane are investigated.
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    Plants monitor their surrounding environment and control their physiological functions by producing an electrical response. We recorded electrical signals from different plants by exposing them to Sodium Chloride (NaCl), Ozone (O3) and Sulfuric Acid (H2SO4) under laboratory conditions. After applying pre-processing techniques such as filtering and drift removal, we extracted few statistical features from the acquired plant electrical signals. Using these features, combined with different classification algorithms, we used a decision tree based multi-class classification strategy to identify the three different external chemical stimuli. We here present our exploration to obtain the optimum set of ranked feature and classifier combination that can separate a particular chemical stimulus from the incoming stream of plant electrical signals. The paper also reports an exhaustive comparison of similar feature based classification using the filtered and the raw plant signals, containing the high frequency stochastic part and also the low frequency trends present in it, as two different cases for feature extraction. The work, presented in this paper opens up new possibilities for using plant electrical signals to monitor and detect other environmental stimuli apart from NaCl, O3 and H2SO4 in future.