Biological Physics (physics.bio-ph)

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    Dynamic patterning of specific proteins is essential for the spatiotemporal regulation of many important intracellular processes in procaryotes, eucaryotes, and multicellular organisms. The emergence of patterns generated by interactions of diffusing proteins is a paradigmatic example for self-organization. In this article we review quantitative models for intracellular Min protein patterns in E. coli, Cdc42 polarization in S. cerevisiae, and the bipolar PAR protein patterns found in C. elegans. By analyzing the molecular processes driving these systems we derive a theoretical perspective on general principles underlying self-organized pattern formation. We argue that intracellular pattern formation is not captured by concepts such as "activators"', "inhibitors", or "substrate-depletion". Instead, intracellular pattern formation is based on the redistribution of proteins by cytosolic diffusion, and the cycling of proteins between distinct conformational states. Therefore, mass-conserving reaction-diffusion equations provide the most appropriate framework to study intracellular pattern formation. We conclude that directed transport, e.g. cytosolic diffusion along an actively maintained cytosolic gradient, is the key process underlying pattern formation. Thus the basic principle of self-organization is the establishment and maintenance of directed transport by intracellular protein dynamics.
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    During the last decade coarse-grained nucleotide models have emerged that allow us to DNA and RNA on unprecedented time and length scales. Among them is oxDNA, a coarse-grained, sequence-specific model that captures the hybridisation transition of DNA and many structural properties of single- and double-stranded DNA. oxDNA was previously only available as standalone software, but has now been implemented into the popular LAMMPS molecular dynamics code. This article describes the new implementation and analyses its parallel performance. Practical applications are presented that focus on single-stranded DNA, an area of research which has been so far under-investigated. The LAMMPS implementation of oxDNA lowers the entry barrier for using the oxDNA model significantly, facilitates future code development and interfacing with existing LAMMPS functionality as well as other coarse-grained and atomistic DNA models.
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    We study the temperature dependence of the underlying mechanisms related to the signal strength and imaging depth in photoacoustic imaging. The presented theoretical and experimental results indicate that imaging depth can be improved by lowering the temperature of the intermediate medium that the laser passes through to reach the imaging target. We discuss the temperature dependency of optical and acoustic properties of the intermediate medium and their changes due to cooling. We demonstrate that the SNR improvement of the photoacoustic signal is mainly due to the reduction of Grüneisen parameter of the intermediate medium which leads to a lower level of background noise. These findings may open new possibilities toward the application of biomedical laser refrigeration.
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    The propagation of an action potential (AP) in a nerve fibre is accompanied by mechanical and thermal effects. In this paper an attempt is made to build up a mathematical model which couples the AP with a possible pressure wave (PW) in the axoplasm and waves in the nerve fibre wall (longitudinal - LW and transverse - TW) made of a lipid bilayer (biomembrane). A system of differential equations includes the governing equations of single waves with coupling forces between them. The single equations are kept as simple as possible in order to carry out the proof of concept. An assumption based on earlier studies is made that the coupling forces depend on changes (the gradient, time derivative) of the voltage. In addition it is assumed that the transverse displacement of the biomembrane can be calculated from the gradient of the LW in the biomembrane. The computational simulation is focused to determining the influence of possible coupling forces on the emergence of mechanical waves from the AP. As a result, an ensemble of waves (AP, PW, LW, TW) emerges. The further experiments should verify assumptions about coupling forces. In the Appendix, the numerical scheme used for simulations, is presented.
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    We present dynamic equations for two dimensional closed surfaces and analytically solve it for some simplified cases. We derive final equations for surface normal motions by two different ways. The solution of the equations of motions in normal direction indicates that any closed, two dimensional, homogeneous surface with time invariable surface energy density adopts constant mean curvature shape when it comes in equilibrium with environment. As an example, we apply the formalism to analyze equilibrium shapes of micelles and explain why they adopt spherical, lamellar and cylindrical shapes. We show that theoretical calculation for micellar optimal radius is in good agreement with all atom simulations and experiments.