Biological Physics (physics.bio-ph)

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    The brain is a paradigmatic example of a complex system as its functionality emerges as a global property of local mesoscopic and microscopic interactions. Complex network theory allows to elicit the functional architecture of the brain in terms of links (correlations) between nodes (grey matter regions) and to extract information out of the noise. Here we present the analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging data from forty healthy humans during the resting condition for the investigation of the basal scaffold of the functional brain network organization. We show how brain regions tend to coordinate by forming a highly hierarchical chain-like structure of homogeneously clustered anatomical areas. A maximum spanning tree approach revealed the centrality of the occipital cortex and the peculiar aggregation of cerebellar regions to form a closed core. We also report the hierarchy of network segregation and the level of clusters integration as a function of the connectivity strength between brain regions.
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    Early theoretical work revealed that the simplest class of autocatalytic cycles, known as hypercycles, provide an elegant framework for understanding the evolution of mutualism. Furthermore, hypercycles are highly susceptible to parasites, spatial structure constituting a key protection against them. However, there is an insufficient experimental validation of these theoretical predictions, in addition to little knowledge on how environmental conditions could shape the spatial dynamics of hypercycles. Here, we constructed spatially extended hypercycles by using synthetic biology as a way to design mutualistic and parasitic \em E. coli strains. A mathematical model of the hypercycle front expansion is developed, providing analytic estimates of front speed propagation. Moreover, we explore how the environment affects the mutualistic consortium during range expansions. Interestingly, moderate improvements in environmental conditions (namely, increasing the availability of growth-limiting amino acids) can lead to a slowing-down of the front speed. Our agent-based simulations suggest that opportunistic depletion of environmental amino acids can lead to subsequent high fractions of stagnant cells at the front, and thus to the slow-down of the front speed. Moreover, environmental deterioration can also shape the interaction of the parasitic strain towards the hypercycle. On the one hand, the parasite is excluded from the population during range expansions in which the two species mutualism can thrive (in agreement with a classical theoretical prediction). On the other hand, environmental deterioration (e.g., associated with toxic chemicals) can lead to the survival of the parasitic strain, while reshaping the interactions within the three-species. The evolutionary and ecological implications for the design of synthetic consortia are outlined.
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    We present a generalized Landau-Brazovskii free energy for the solidification of chiral molecules on a spherical surface in the context of the assembly of viral shells. We encounter two types of icosahedral solidification transitions. The first type is a conventional first-order phase transition from the uniform to the icosahedral state. It can be described by a single icosahedral spherical harmonic of even $l$. The chiral pseudo-scalar term in the free energy creates secondary terms with chiral character but it does not affect the thermodynamics of the transition. The second type, associated with icosahedral spherical harmonics with odd $l$, is anomalous. Pure odd $l$ icosahedral states are unstable but stability is recovered if admixture with the neighboring $l+1$ icosahedral spherical harmonic is included, generated by the non-linear terms. This is in conflict with the principle of Landau theory that symmetry-breaking transitions are characterized by only a \textitsingle irreducible representation of the symmetry group of the uniform phase and we argue that this principle should be removed from Landau theory. The chiral term now directly affects the transition because it lifts the degeneracy between two isomeric mixed-$l$ icosahedral states. A direct transition is possible only over a limited range of parameters. Outside this range, non-icosahedral states intervene. For the important case of capsid assembly dominated by $l=15$, the intervening states are found to be based on octahedral symmetry.