Biological Physics (physics.bio-ph)

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    Multicellular chemotaxis can occur via individually chemotaxing cells that are physically coupled. Alternatively, it can emerge collectively, from cells chemotaxing differently in a group than they would individually. We find that while the speeds of these two mechanisms are roughly the same, the precision of emergent chemotaxis is higher than that of individual-based chemotaxis for one-dimensional cell chains and two-dimensional cell sheets, but not three-dimensional cell clusters. We describe the physical origins of these results, discuss their biological implications, and show how they can be tested using common experimental measures such as the chemotactic index.
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    Microcolonies are aggregates of a few dozen to a few thousand cells exhibited by many bacteria. The formation of microcolonies is a crucial step towards the formation of more mature bacterial communities known as biofilms, but also mark a significant change in bacterial physiology. Within a microcolony, bacteria forgo a single cell lifestyle for a communal lifestyle hallmarked by high cell density and physical interactions between cells potentially leading to differentiation. It is thus crucial to understand how this transition occurs: how identical single cells assemble in these tight communities and might start to behave differently. Here we show that cells in the microcolonies formed by the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Ng) present differential motility behaviors within an hour upon colony formation. Observation of merging microcolonies and tracking of single cells within microcolonies reveal a heterogeneous motility behavior: cells close to the outside of the microcolony exhibit a much higher motility compared to cells towards the center. Extensive numerical simulations of a biophysical model for the microcolonies at the single cell level indicate that mechanical forces exerted by the bacterial cells are sufficient to generate the observed heterogeneous motility. Further corroborating this idea, experiment with cells lacking the ability to exert forces on their surroundings leads to their segregation on the outside of microcolonies as predicted by the biophysical model. This emergence of differential behavior within a multicellular microcolony is thus of mechanical origin and is likely the first step toward further bacterial differentiation and ultimately mature biofilms.
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    Hair cells, the sensory receptors of the internal ear, subserve different functions in various receptor organs: they detect oscillatory stimuli in the auditory system, but transduce constant and step stimuli in the vestibular and lateral-line systems. We show that a hair cell's function can be controlled experimentally by adjusting its mechanical load. By making bundles from a single organ operate as any of four distinct types of signal detector, we demonstrate that altering only a few key parameters can fundamentally change a sensory cell's role. The motions of a single hair bundle can resemble those of a bundle from the amphibian vestibular system, the reptilian auditory system, or the mammalian auditory system, demonstrating an essential similarity of bundles across species and receptor organs.
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    In MR elastography it is common to use an elastic model for the tissue's response in order to properly interpret the results. More complex models such as viscoelastic, fractional viscoelastic, poroelastic, or poroviscoelastic ones are also used. These models appear at first sight to be very different, but here it is shown that they all may be expressed in terms of elementary viscoelastic models. For a medium expressed with fractional models, many elementary spring-damper combinations are added, each of them weighted according to a long-tailed distribution, hinting at a fractional distribution of time constants or relaxation frequencies. This may open up for a more physical interpretation of the fractional models. The shear wave component of the poroelastic model is shown to be modeled exactly by a three-component Zener model. The extended poroviscoelastic model is found to be equivalent to what is called a non-standard four-parameter model. Accordingly, the large number of parameters in the porous models can be reduced to the same number as in their viscoelastic equivalents. As long as the individual displacements from the solid and fluid parts cannot be measured individually the main use of the poro(visco)elastic models is therefore as a physics based method for determining parameters in a viscoelastic model.