Atomic Physics (physics.atom-ph)

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    We theoretically study artificial light harvesting by a dimerized Mobius ring. When the donors in the ring are dimerized, the energies of the donor ring are splitted into two sub-bands. Because of the nontrivial Mobius boundary condition, both the photon and acceptor are coupled to all collectiveexcitation modes in the donor ring. Therefore, the quantum dynamics in the light harvesting are subtly influenced by the dimerization in the Mobius ring. It is discovered that energy transfer is more efficient in a dimerized ring than that in an equally-spaced ring. This discovery is also confirmed by the calculation with the perturbation theory, which is equivalent to the Wigner-Weisskopf approximation. Our findings may be benificial to the optimal design of artificial light harvesting.
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    We demonstrate the control of electron-electron correlation in frustrated double ionization (FDI) of the two-electron triatomic molecule D$_{3}^{+}$ when driven by two orthogonally polarized two-color laser fields. We employ a three-dimensional semi-classical model that fully accounts for the electron and nuclear motion in strong fields. We analyze the FDI probability and the distribution of the momentum of the escaping electron along the polarization direction of the longer wavelength and more intense laser field. These observables when considered in conjunction bare clear signatures of the prevalence or absence of electron-electron correlation in FDI, depending on the time-delay between the two laser pulses. We find that D$_{3}^{+}$ is a better candidate compared to H$_{2}$ for demonstrating also experimentally that electron-electron correlation indeed underlies FDI.
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    Ellipticity-induced resonances in the magnetic-field dependence of nonlinear magneto-optical rotation of frequency-modulated light propagating through an atomic vapor are observed and studied. The resonances provide a precision $\textit{in situ}$ method to measure and control the ellipticity of light interacting with the atomic vapor and minimize associated vector light shifts. In these experiments, the light propagation direction is orthogonal to the applied magnetic field $\textbf{B}$ and the major axis of the light polarization ellipse is along $\textbf{B}$. When the light modulation frequency matches the Larmor frequency, elliptically polarized light produces precessing atomic spin orientation transverse to $\textbf{B}$ via synchronous optical pumping. The precessing spin orientation causes optical rotation oscillating at the Larmor frequency by modulating the atomic vapor's circular birefringence. The accuracy with which light ellipticity can be measured exceeds that of existing methods by orders of magnitude.
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    High-precision QED calculations of the ground-state ionization energies are performed for all boronlike ions with the nuclear charge numbers in the range $16 \leqslant Z\leqslant 96$. The rigorous QED calculations are performed within the extended Furry picture and include all many-electron QED effects up to the second order of the perturbation theory. The contributions of the third- and higher-order electron-correlation effects are accounted for within the Breit approximation. The nuclear recoil and nuclear polarization effects are taken into account as well. In comparison with the previous evaluations of the ground-state ionization energies of boronlike ions the accuracy of the theoretical predictions has been improved significantly.
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    In this chapter we review the field of radio-frequency dressed atom trapping. We emphasise the role of adiabatic potentials and give simple, but generic models of electromagnetic fields that currently produce traps for atoms at microkelvin temperatures and below. The paper aims to be didactic and starts with general descriptions of the essential ingredients of adiabaticity and magnetic resonance. As examples of adiabatic potentials we pay attention to radio-frequency dressing in both the quadrupole trap and the Ioffe-Pritchard trap. We include a description of the effect of different choices of radio-frequency polarisation and orientations or alignment. We describe how the adiabatic potentials, formed from radio-frequency fields, can themselves be probed and manipulated with additional radio-frequency fields including multi-photon-effects. We include a description of time-averaged adiabatic potentials. Practical issues for the construction of radio-frequency adiabatic potentials are addressed including noise, harmonics, and beyond rotating wave approximation effects.
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    We report attosecond-scale probing of the laser-induced dynamics in molecules. We apply the method of high-harmonic spectroscopy, where laser-driven recolliding electrons on various trajec- tories record the motion of their parent ion. Based on the transient phase-matching mechanism of high-order harmonic generation, short and long trajectories contributing to the same harmonic order are distinguishable in both the spatial and frequency domains, giving rise to a one-to-one map between time and photon energy for each trajectory. The short and long trajectories in H2 and D2 are used simultaneously to retrieve the nuclear dynamics on the attosecond and angstrom scale. Compared to using only short trajectories, this extends the temporal range of the measurement to one optical cycle. The experiment is also applied to methane and ammonia molecules.
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    We present the properties of a magneto-optical trap (MOT) of CaF molecules. We study the process of loading the MOT from a decelerated buffer-gas-cooled beam, and how best to slow this molecular beam in order to capture the most molecules. We determine how the number of molecules, the photon scattering rate, the oscillation frequency, damping constant, temperature, cloud size and lifetime depend on the key parameters of the MOT, especially the intensity and detuning of the main cooling laser. We compare our results to analytical and numerical models, to the properties of standard atomic MOTs, and to MOTs of SrF molecules. We load up to $2 \times 10^4$ molecules, and measure a maximum scattering rate of $2.5 \times 10^6$ s$^{-1}$ per molecule, a maximum oscillation frequency of 100 Hz, a maximum damping constant of 500 s$^{-1}$, and a minimum MOT rms radius of 1.5 mm. A minimum temperature of 730 $\mu$K is obtained by ramping down the laser intensity to low values. The lifetime, typically about 100 ms, is consistent with a leak out of the cooling cycle with a branching ratio of about $6 \times 10^{-6}$. The MOT has a capture velocity of about 11 m/s.