Atomic Physics (physics.atom-ph)

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    Electric-field noise from the surfaces of ion-trap electrodes couples to the ion's charge causing heating of the ion's motional modes. This heating limits the fidelity of quantum gates implemented in quantum information processing experiments. The exact mechanism that gives rise to electric-field noise from surfaces is not well-understood and remains an active area of research. In this work, we detail experiments intended to measure ion motional heating rates with exchangeable surfaces positioned in close proximity to the ion, as a sensor to electric-field noise. We have prepared samples with various surface conditions, characterized in situ with scanned probe microscopy and electron spectroscopy, ranging in degrees of cleanliness and structural order. The heating-rate data, however, show no significant differences between the disparate surfaces that were probed. These results suggest that the driving mechanism for electric-field noise from surfaces is due to more than just thermal excitations alone.
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    An analytical, single-parametric, complete and orthonormal basis set consisting of the hydrogen wave-functions is put forward for \textitab initio calculations of observable characteristics of an arbitrary many-electron atom. By introducing a single parameter for the whole basis set of a given atom, namely an effective charge $Z^{*}$, we find a sufficiently good analytical approximation for the atomic characteristics of all elements of the periodic table. The basis completeness allows us to perform a transition into the secondary-quantized representation for the construction of a regular perturbation theory, which includes in a natural way correlation effects and allows one to easily calculate the subsequent corrections. The hydrogen-like basis set provides a possibility to perform all summations over intermediate states in closed form, with the help of the decomposition of the multi-particle Green function in a convolution of single-electronic Coulomb Green functions. We demonstrate that our analytical zeroth-order approximation provides better accuracy than the Thomas-Fermi model and already in second-order perturbation theory our results become comparable with those via multi-configuration Hartree-Fock.
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    The linear susceptibility of an atomic sample is formally equivalent to the response of a RLC circuit. We use a ladder of lumped RLC circuits to observe an analogue of slow-light, a well-known phenomenon in atomic physics. We first characterize the radio-frequency response of the circuit in the spectral domain exhibiting a transparency window surrounded by two strongly absorptive lines. We then observe a delayed pulse whose group delay is comparable to the pulse duration corresponding to slow-light propagation. The large group delay is obtained by cascading in a ladder configuration doubly resonant RLC cells.
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    We report on an original and simple formulation of the phase shift in N-light-pulse atom interferometers. We consider atomic interferometers based on two-photon transitions (Raman transitions or Bragg pulses). Starting from the exact analytical phase shift formula obtained from the atom optics ABCD formalism, we use a power series expansion in time of the position of the atomic wave packet with respect to the initial condition. The result of this expansion leads to a formulation of the interferometer phase shift where the leading coefficient in the phase terms up to T^k dependences (k >= 0) in the time separation T between pulses, can be simply expressed in terms of a product between a Vandermonde matrix, and a vector characterizing the two-photon pulse sequence of the interferometer. This simple coefficient dependence of the phase shift reflects very well the atom interferometer's sensitivity to a specific inertial field in the presence of multiple gravito-inertial effects. Consequently,we show that this formulation is well suited when looking for selective atomic sensors of accelerations, rotations, or photon recoil only, which can be obtained by simply zeroing some specific coefficients. We give a theoritical application of our formulation to the photon recoil measurement.
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    We suggest a simple approach to populate photonic quantum materials at non-zero chemical potential and near-zero temperature. Taking inspiration from forced evaporation in cold-atom experiments, the essential ingredients for our low-entropy thermal reservoir are (a) inter-particle interactions, and (b) energy-dependent loss. The resulting thermal reservoir may then be coupled to a broad class of Hamiltonian systems to produce low-entropy quantum phases. We present an idealized picture of such a reservoir, deriving the scaling of reservoir entropy with system parameters, and then propose several practical implementations using only standard circuit quantum electrodynamics tools, and extract the fundamental performance limits. Finally, we explore, both analytically and numerically, the coupling of such a thermalizer to the paradigmatic Bose-Hubbard chain, where we employ it to stabilize an $n=1$ Mott phase. In this case, the performance is limited by the interplay of dynamically arrested thermalization of the Mott insulator and finite heat capacity of the thermalizer, characterized by its repumping rate. This work explores a new approach to preparation of quantum phases of strongly interacting photons, and provides a potential route to topologically protected phases that are difficult to reach through adiabatic evolution.
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    We measured the absolute frequency of the $^1S_0$ - $^3P_0$ transition of $^{171}$Yb atoms confined in a one-dimensional optical lattice relative to the SI second. The determined frequency was 518 295 836 590 863.38(57) Hz. The uncertainty was reduced by a factor of 14 compared with our previously reported value in 2013 due to the significant improvements in decreasing the systematic uncertainties. This result is expected to contribute to the determination of a new recommended value for the secondary representations of the second.
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    The $5p$ two-photon ionization cross section of xenon in the photon-energy range below the one-photon ionization threshold is calculated within the time-dependent configuration-interaction-singles (TDCIS) method. The TDCIS calculations are compared to random-phase-approximation (RPA) calculations [Wendin \textitet al., J. Opt. Soc. Am. B \textbf4, 833 (1987)] and are found to reproduce the energy positions of the intermediate Rydberg states reasonably well. The effect of interchannel coupling is also investigated and found to change the cross section of the $5p$ shell only slightly compared to the intrachannel case.