Atomic and Molecular Clusters (physics.atm-clus)

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    When matter is exposed to a high-intensity x-ray free-electron-laser pulse, the x rays excite inner-shell electrons leading to the ionization of the electrons through various atomic processes and creating high-energy-density plasma, i.e., warm dense matter. The resulting system consists of atoms in various electronic configurations, thermalizing on sub-picosecond to picosecond timescales after photoexcitation. We present a simulation study of x-ray-heated warm dense matter. For this we use XMDYN, a Monte-Carlo molecular-dynamics-based code with periodic boundary conditions, which allows one to investigate non-equilibrium dynamics and in particular, the approach to equilibrium. XMDYN is capable of treating systems containing light and heavy atomic species with full electronic configuration space and 3D spatial inhomogeneity. We compare the electron temperatures and the ion charge-state distribution from XMDYN to results on the thermalized system based on the average-atom model implemented in XATOM, an \textitab-initio x-ray atomic physics toolkit extended to include a plasma environment. Further, we also compare average charge evolution for a system reaching towards equilibrium with the predictions of a Boltzmann continuum approach. We demonstrate that XMDYN results are in good quantitative agreement with the above mentioned approaches, suggesting that the current implementation of XMDYN is a viable approach to simulate the dynamics of x-ray-driven matter.
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    The influence of the surface curvature on the surface tension of small droplets in equilibrium with a surrounding vapour, or small bubbles in equilibrium with a surrounding liquid, can be expanded as $\gamma(R) = \gamma_0 + c_1\gamma_0/R + O(1/R^2)$, where $R = R_\gamma$ is the radius of the surface of tension and $\gamma_0$ is the surface tension of the planar interface, corresponding to zero curvature. According to Tolman's law, the first-order coefficient in this expansion is assumed to be related to the planar limit $\delta_0$ of the Tolman length, i.e., the difference $\delta = R_\rho - R_\gamma$ between the equimolar radius and the radius of the surface of tension, by $c_1 = -2\delta_0$. We show here that the deduction of Tolman's law from interfacial thermodynamics relies on an inaccurate application of the Gibbs adsorption equation to dispersed phases (droplets or bubbles). A revision of the underlying theory reveals that the adsorption equation needs to be employed in an alternative manner to that suggested by Tolman. Accordingly, we develop a generalized Gibbs adsorption equation which consistently takes the size dependence of interfacial properties into account, and show that from this equation, a relation between the Tolman length and the influence of the size of the dispersed phase on the surface tension cannot be deduced, invalidating the argument which was put forward by Tolman [J. Chem. Phys. 17 (1949) 333].