Accelerator Physics (physics.acc-ph)

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    This paper will detail changes in the operational paradigm of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) magnetron $H^{-}$ ion source due to upgrades in the accelerator system. Prior to November of 2012 the $H^{-}$ ions for High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments were extracted at ~18 keV vertically downward into a 90 degree bending magnet and accelerated through a Cockcroft-Walton accelerating column to 750 keV. Following the upgrade in the fall of 2012 the $H^{-}$ ions are now directly extracted from a magnetron at 35 keV and accelerated to 750 keV by a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). This change in extraction energy as well as the orientation of the ion source required not only a redesign of the ion source, but an updated understanding of its operation at these new values. Discussed in detail are the changes to the ion source timing, arc discharge current, hydrogen gas pressure, and cesium delivery system that were needed to maintain consistent operation at >99% uptime for HEP, with an increased ion source lifetime of over 9 months.
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    The magnetron-style $H^{-}$ ion sources currently in operation at Fermilab use piezoelectric gas valves to function. This kind of gas valve is sensitive to small changes in ambient temperature, which affect the stability and performance of the ion source. This motivates the need to find an alternative way of feeding H2 gas into the source. A solenoid-type gas valve has been characterized in a dedicated off-line test stand to assess the feasibility of its use in the operational ion sources. $H^{-}$ ion beams have been extracted at 35 keV using this valve. In this study, the performance of the solenoid gas valve has been characterized measuring the beam current output of the magnetron source with respect to the voltage and pulse width of the signal applied to the gas valve.
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    Fermilab is committed to upgrade its accelerator complex to support HEP experiments at the intensity frontier. The ongoing Proton Improvement Plan (PIP) enables us to reach 700 kW beam power on the NuMI neutrino targets. By the end of the next decade, the current 400 MeV normal conducting LINAC will be replaced by an 800 MeV superconducting LINAC (PIP-II) with an increased beam power >50% of the PIP design goal. Both in PIP and PIP-II era, the existing Booster is going to play a very significant role, at least for next two decades. In the meanwhile, we have recently developed an innovative beam injection and bunching scheme for the Booster called "early injection scheme" that continues to use the existing 400 MeV LINAC and implemented into operation. This scheme has the potential to increase the Booster beam intensity by >40% from the PIP design goal. Some benefits from the scheme have already been seen. In this paper, I will describe the basic principle of the scheme, results from recent beam experiments, our experience with the new scheme in operation, current status, issues and future plans. This scheme fits well with the current and future intensity upgrade programs at Fermilab.
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    Background The nuclear structure of the cluster bands in $^{20}$Ne presents a challenge for different theoretical approaches. It is especially difficult to explain the broad 0$^+$, 2$^+$ states at 9 MeV excitation energy. Simultaneously, it is important to obtain more reliable experimental data for these levels in order to quantitatively assess the theoretical framework. Purpose To obtain new data on $^{20}$Ne $\alpha$ cluster structure. Method Thick target inverse kinematics technique was used to study the $^{16}$O+$\alpha$ resonance elastic scattering and the data were analyzed using an \textitR matrix approach. The $^{20}$Ne spectrum, the cluster and nucleon spectroscopic factors were calculated using cluster-nucleon configuration interaction model (CNCIM). Results We determined the parameters of the broad resonances in \textsuperscript20Ne: 0$^+$ level at 8.77 $\pm$ 0.150 MeV with a width of 750 (+500/-220) keV; 2$^+$ level at 8.75 $\pm$ 0.100 MeV with the width of 695 $\pm$ 120 keV; the width of 9.48 MeV level of 65 $\pm$ 20 keV and showed that 9.19 MeV, 2$^+$ level (if exists) should have width $\leq$ 10 keV. The detailed comparison of the theoretical CNCIM predictions with the experimental data on cluster states was made. Conclusions Our experimental results by the TTIK method generally confirm the adopted data on $\alpha$ cluster levels in $^{20}$Ne. The CNCIM gives a good description of the $^{20}$Ne positive parity states up to an excitation energy of $\sim$ 7 MeV, predicting reasonably well the excitation energy of the states and their cluster and single particle properties. At higher excitations, the qualitative disagreement with the experimentally observed structure is evident, especially for broad resonances.
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    The paper discusses an advanced level information system to support educational, research and scientific activities of the Department "Electrophysical Facilities" (DEF) of the National Research Nuclear University "MEPhI" (NRNU MEPhI), which is used for training of specialists of the course "Physics of Charged Particle Beams and Accelerator Technology".
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    Multiphoton processes in undulators with plane polarized magnetic field are considered. It is shown that the use of strong magnetic fields in the undulator, for beams with relatively low energy makes it possible to increase substantially the frequencies of the amplified electromagnetic waves without noticeably decreasing the gain. The absorption, emission probabilities and the gain are calculated.
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    A high-energy muon collider scenario requires a final cooling system that reduces transverse emittance to ~25 microns (normalized) while allowing longitudinal emittance increase. Ionization cooling using high-field solenoids (or Li Lens) can reduce transverse emittances to ~100 microns in readily achievable configurations, confirmed by simulation. Passing these muon beams at ~100 MeV/c through cm-sized diamond wedges can reduce transverse emittances to ~25 microns, while increasing longitudinal emittances by a factor of ~25. Implementation will require optical matching of the exiting beam into downstream acceleration systems.
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    In a partnership with SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) and Jefferson Lab, Fermilab will assemble and test 17 of the 35 total 1.3 GHz cryomodules for the Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) Project. These devices will be tested at Fermilab's Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) within the Cryomodule Test Stand (CMTS-1) cave. The problem of magnetic pollution became one of major issues during design stage of the LCLS-II cryomodule as the average quality factor of the accelerating cavities is specified to be $2.7 \times 10^{10}$. One of the possible ways to mitigate the effect of stray magnetic fields and to keep it below the goal of 5 mGauss involves the application of low permeable materials. Initial permeability and magnetic measurement studies regarding the use of 316L stainless steel material indicated that cold work (machining) and heat affected zones from welding would be acceptable.
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    An "ultimate" high intensity proton source for neutrino factories and/or muon colliders was projected to be a ~4 MW multi-GeV proton source providing short, intense proton pulses at ~15 Hz. The JPARC ~1 MW accelerators provide beam at parameters that in many respects overlap these goals. Proton pulses from the JPARC Main Ring can readily meet the pulsed intensity goals. We explore these parameters, describing the overlap and consider extensions that may take a JPARC-like facility toward this "ultimate" source. JPARC itself could serve as a stage 1 source for such a facility.