More Physics (physics)

  • PDF
    The concept of correlation is central to all approaches that attempt the description of many-body effects in electronic systems. Multipartite correlation is a quantum information theoretical property that is attributed to quantum states independent of the underlying physics. In quantum chemistry, however, the correlation energy (the energy not seized by the Hartree-Fock ansatz) plays a more prominent role. We show that these two different viewpoints on electron correlation are closely related. The key ingredient turns out to be the energy gap within the symmetry-adapted subspace. We then use a few-site Hubbard model and the stretched H$_2$ to illustrate this connection and to show how the corresponding measures of correlation compare.
  • PDF
    Porous electrode theory, pioneered by John Newman and collaborators, provides a useful macroscopic description of battery cycling behavior, rooted in microscopic physical models rather than empirical circuit approximations. The theory relies on a separation of length scales to describe transport in the electrode coupled to intercalation within small active material particles. Typically, the active materials are described as solid solution particles with transport and surface reactions driven by concentration fields, and the thermodynamics are incorporated through fitting of the open circuit potential. This approach has fundamental limitations, however, and does not apply to phase-separating materials, for which the voltage is an emergent property of inhomogeneous concentration profiles, even in equilibrium. Here, we present a general theoretical framework for "multiphase porous electrode theory" implemented in an open-source software package called "MPET", based on electrochemical nonequilibrium thermodynamics. Cahn-Hilliard-type phase field models are used to describe the solid active materials with suitably generalized models of interfacial reaction kinetics. Classical concentrated solution theory is implemented for the electrolyte phase, and Newman's porous electrode theory is recovered in the limit of solid-solution active materials with Butler-Volmer kinetics. More general, quantum-mechanical models of Faradaic reactions are also included, such as Marcus-Hush-Chidsey kinetics for electron transfer at metal electrodes, extended for concentrated solutions. The full equations and numerical algorithms are described, and a variety of example calculations are presented to illustrate the novel features of the software compared to existing battery models.
  • PDF
    A presentation at the SciNeGHE conference of the past achievements, of the present activities and of the perspectives for the future of the HARPO project, the development of a time projection chamber as a high-performance gamma-ray telescope and linear polarimeter in the e+e- pair creation regime.
  • PDF
    Plane Poiseuille flow, the pressure driven flow between parallel plates, shows a route to turbulence connected with a linear instability to Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves, and another one, the bypass transition, that is triggered with finite amplitude perturbation. We use direct numerical simulations to explore the arrangement of the different routes to turbulence among the set of initial conditions. For plates that are a distance $2H$ apart and in a domain of width $2\pi H$ and length $2\pi H$ the subcritical instability to TS waves sets in at $Re_{c}=5815$ that extends down to $Re_{TS}\approx4884$. The bypass route becomes available above $Re_E=459$ with the appearance of three-dimensional finite-amplitude traveling waves. The bypass transition covers a large set of finite amplitude perturbations. Below $Re_c$, TS appear for a tiny set of initial conditions that grows with increasing Reynolds number. Above $Re_c$ the previously stable region becomes unstable via TS waves, but a sharp transition to the bypass route can still be identified. Both routes lead to the same turbulent in the final stage of the transition, but on different time scales. Similar phenomena can be expected in other flows where two or more routes to turbulence compete.
  • PDF
    We generalize the conditions for stable electrodeposition at isotropic solid-solid interfaces using a kinetic model which incorporates the effects of stresses and surface tension at the interface. We develop a stability diagram that shows two regimes of stability: previously known pressure-driven mechanism and a new density-driven stability mechanism that is governed by the relative density of lithium in the two phases. Ceramic solids and solid polymers generally do not lead to stable electrodeposition, but polymer-ceramic composites represent a potential path forward for dendrite suppression.
  • PDF
    Dynamical equations describing physical systems at statistical equilibrium are commonly extended by mathematical tools called "thermostats". These tools are designed for sampling ensembles of statistical mechanics. We propose a dynamic principle for derivation of stochastic and deterministic thermostats. It is based on fundamental physical assumptions such that the canonical measure is invariant for the thermostat dynamics. This is a clear advantage over a range of recently proposed and widely discussed in the literature mathematical thermostat schemes. Following justification of the proposed principle we show its generality and usefulness for modeling a wide range of natural systems.
  • PDF
    In this paper we propose a 'knee-like' approximation of the lateral distribution of the Cherenkov light from extensive air showers in the energy range 30-3000 TeV and study a possibility of its practical application in high energy ground-based gamma-ray astronomy experiments (in particular, in TAIGA-HiSCORE). The approximation has a very good accuracy for individual showers and can be easily simplified for practical application in the HiSCORE wide angle timing array in the condition of a limited number of triggered stations.
  • PDF
    We have studied the cathodo- and radioluminescence of Nd:YAG and of Tm:YAG single crystals in an extended wavelength range up to $\approx 5\,\mu$m in view of developing a new kind of detector for low-energy, low-rate energy deposition events. Whereas the light yield in the visible range is as large as $\approx 10^{4}\,$photons/MeV, in good agreement with literature results, in the infrared range we have found a light yield $\approx 5\times 10^{4}\,$photons/MeV, thereby proving that ionizing radiation is particularly efficient in populating the low lying levels of rare earth doped crystals.
  • PDF
    We investigate the accuracy and robustness of one of the most common methods used in glaciology for the discretization of the $\mathfrak{p}$-Stokes equations: equal order finite elements with Galerkin Least-Squares (GLS) stabilization. Furthermore we compare the results to other stabilized methods. We find that the vertical velocity component is more sensitive to the choice of GLS stabilization parameter than horizontal velocity. Additionally, the accuracy of the vertical velocity component is especially important since errors in this component can cause ice surface instabilities and propagate into future ice volume predictions. If the element cell size is set to the minimum edge length and the stabilization parameter is allowed to vary non-linearly with viscosity, the GLS stabilization parameter found in literature is a good choice on simple domains. However, near ice margins the standard parameter choice may result in significant oscillations in the vertical component of the surface velocity. For these cases, other stabilization techniques, such as the interior penalty method, result in better accuracy and are less sensitive to the choice of the stabilization parameter. During this work we also discovered that the manufactured solutions often used to evaluate errors in glaciology are not reliable due to high artificial surface forces at singularities. We perform our numerical experiments in both FEniCS and Elmer/Ice.
  • PDF
    Many measurements of geophysical interest are contaminated by tidal effects, which can have amplitudes greater than the ones in the events intended to be investigated. One of these measurements is the precise monitoring of the Earth's gravity field, regarded as a powerful tool for investigation of seismically induced deformations, hydrological effects on the ground and ice cap variations. Superconducting gravimeters have sensitivity below the 1nm/s$^2$ level, able to investigate those phenomena, and data from instruments in 33 locations globally distributed are available from the International Geodynamics and Earth Tides Service. However, fluctuations due to the Earth tides, with amplitudes typically in the order of 2000nm/s$^2$, dominate the signals, and must be removed before proceeding to the specific applications. In this work, we compare, for 5 locations(8 instruments) representative of the network, three different conceptual approaches that could be used for tide removal: frequency filtering, physical modelling and data-based modelling. Each approach applied to gravity time-series has shown a different limitation to be considered depending on the intended application. Results reveal that vestiges of tides remain in the residues for the modelling procedures, whereas the signal was distorted in the filtering procedures. The classical method with the best performance was the least-squares data-based modelling. However, the validation tests were not fulfilled, issue commonly related to overfitting. Although the tides could not be completely eliminated by the methods, they were sufficiently reduced to allow observation of geophysical events of interest above the 10nm/s$^2$ level, exemplified by a hydrology-related event of 60nm/s$^2$. The implementations adopted for each conceptual approach are general, so that the principles could be applied to other kinds of signals affected by tides.
  • PDF
    The beginning of the calendar record inscribed on the Mamari tablet has been dated to the day of the summer solstice of December 20, 1680 A.D. The moon was not visible earlier at night. Because of a possible solar eclipse it was a perilous day, a precursor of the future misfortunes: the motion of Halley's Comet of 1682 A.D. and the rebellion of the western tribes. The new data about the watchings of the star Antares have been obtained, too.
  • PDF
    We present a dual-comb spectrometer based on two passively mode-locked waveguide lasers integrated in a single Er-doped ZBLAN chip. This original design yields two free-running frequency combs having a high level of mutual stability. We developed in parallel a self-correction algorithm that compensates residual relative fluctuations and yields mode-resolved spectra without the help of any reference laser or control system. Fluctuations are extracted directly from the interferograms using the concept of ambiguity function, which leads to a significant simplification of the instrument that will greatly ease its widespread adoption. Comparison with a correction algorithm relying on a single-frequency laser indicates discrepancies of only 50 attoseconds on optical timings. The capacities of this instrument are finally demonstrated with the acquisition of a high-resolution molecular spectrum covering 20 nm. This new chip-based multi-laser platform is ideal for the development of high-repetition-rate, compact and fieldable comb spectrometers in the near- and mid-infrared.
  • PDF
    The secondary neutron fields at the deep tumor therapy terminal at HIRFL (Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou) were investigated. The distributions of neutron ambient dose equivalent were measured with a FHT762 Wendi-II neutron ambient dose equivalent meter as the 12C ions with energies of 165, 207, 270, and 350 MeV/u bombarded on thick tissue-like targets. The thickness of targets used in experiments is larger than the range of the carbon ions. The neutron spectra and dose equivalent is simulated by using FLUKA code, and the results agree well with the experimental data. The experiment results showed that the neutron dose produced by fragmentation reactions in tissue can be neglected in carbon-ion therapy, even considering their enhanced biological effectiveness. These results are also valuable for radiation protection, especially in the shielding design of high energy heavy ion medical machines.
  • PDF
    We present the design of a compact absolute optical frequency reference for space applications based on hyperfine transitions in molecular iodine with a targeted fractional frequency instability of better than $3\cdot 10^{-14}$. It is based on a micro-integrated extended cavity diode laser with integrated optical amplifier, fiber pigtailed second harmonic generation wave-guide modules, and a quasi-monolithic spectroscopy setup with operating electronics. The instrument described here is scheduled for launch end of 2017 aboard the TEXUS 54 sounding rocket as an important qualification step towards space application of iodine frequency references and related technologies. The payload will operate autonomously and its optical frequency will be compared to an optical frequency comb during its space flight.
  • PDF
    Allosteric effects are often underlying the activity of proteins and elucidating generic design aspects and functional principles which are unique to allosteric phenomena represents a major challenge. Here an approach which consists in the in silico design of synthetic structures which, as the principal element of allostery, encode dynamical long-range coupling among two sites is presented. The structures are represented by elastic networks, similar to coarse-grained models of real proteins. A strategy of evolutionary optimization was implemented to iteratively improve allosteric coupling. In the designed structures allosteric interactions were analyzed in terms of strain propagation and simple pathways which emerged during evolution were identified as signatures through which long-range communication was established. Moreover, robustness of allosteric performance with respect to mutations was demonstrated. As it turned out, the designed prototype structures reveal dynamical properties resembling those found in real allosteric proteins. Hence, they may serve as toy models of complex allosteric systems, such as proteins.
  • PDF
    Polarized neutrons are a powerful probe to investigate magnetism in condensed matter on length scales from single atomic distances to micrometers. With the ongoing advancement of neutron optics, that allow to transport beams with increased divergence, the demands on neutron polarizes and analyzers have grown as well. The situation becomes especially challenging for new instruments at pulsed sources, where a large wavelength band needs to be polarized to make efficient use of the time structure of the beam. Here we present a polarization analysis concept for highly focused neutron beams that is based on transmission supermirrors that are bend in the shape of equiangular spirals. The method allows polarizations above 95\% and good transmission, without negative impact on other beam characteristics. An example of a compact polarizing device already tested on the AMOR reflectometer is presented as well as the concept for the next generation implementation of the technique that will be installed on the Estia instrument being build for the European Spallation Source.
  • PDF
    This work is a methodical study of another option of the hybrid method originally aimed at gamma/hadron separation in the TAIGA experiment. In the present paper this technique was performed to distinguish between different mass groups of cosmic rays in the energy range 200 TeV - 500 TeV. The study was based on simulation data of TAIGA prototype and included analysis of geometrical form of images produced by different nuclei in the IACT simulation as well as shower core parameters reconstructed using timing array simulation. We show that the hybrid method can be sufficiently effective to precisely distinguish between mass groups of cosmic rays.
  • PDF
    We demonstrate a new technique for detecting components of arbitrarily-shaped radio-frequency waveforms based on stroboscopic back-action evading measurements. We combine quantum non-demolition measurements and stroboscopic probing to detect waveform components with magnetic sensitivity beyond the standard quantum limit. Using an ensemble of $1.5\times 10^6$ cold rubidium atoms, we demonstrate entanglement-enhanced sensing of sinusoidal and linearly chirped waveforms, with 1.0(2)dB and 0.8(3)dB metrologically relevant noise reduction, respectively. We achieve volume-adjusted sensitivity of $\delta\rm{B}\sqrt{V}\approx 11.20~\rm{fT\sqrt{cm^3/Hz}}$, comparable to the best RF~magnetometers.
  • PDF
    A new relativistic method based on the Dirac equation for calculating fully differential cross sections for ionization in ion-atom collisions is developed. The method is applied to ionization of the atomic hydrogen by antiproton impact, as a non-relativistic benchmark. The fully differential, as well as various doubly and singly differential cross sections for ionization are presented. The role of the interaction between the projectile and the target nucleus is discussed. Several discrepancies in available theoretical predictions are resolved. The relativistic effects are studied for ionization of hydrogenlike xenon ion under the impact of carbon nuclei.
  • PDF
    Using state-of-the-art techniques combining imaging methods and high-throughput genomic mapping tools leaded to the significant progress in detailing chromosome architecture of various organisms. However, a gap still remains between the rapidly growing structural data on the chromosome folding and the large-scale genome organization. Could a part of information on the chromosome folding be obtained directly from underlying genomic DNA sequences abundantly stored in the databanks? To answer this question, we developed an original discrete double Fourier transform (DDFT). DDFT serves for the detection of large-scale genome regularities associated with domains/units at the different levels of hierarchical chromosome folding. The method is versatile and can be applied to both genomic DNA sequences and corresponding physico-chemical parameters such as base-pairing free energy. The latter characteristic is closely related to the replication and transcription and can also be used for the assessment of temperature or supercoiling effects on the chromosome folding. We tested the method on the genome of Escherichia coli K-12 and found good correspondence with the annotated domains/units established experimentally. The combined experimental, modeling, and bioinformatic DDFT analysis should yield more complete knowledge on the chromosome architecture and genome organization.
  • PDF
    We describe the capability of a high-resolution three-dimensional digital image correlation (DIC) system specifically designed for high strain-rate experiments. Utilising open-source camera calibration and two-dimensional DIC tools within the MATLAB framework, a single camera three-dimensional DIC system with submicron displacement resolution is demonstrated. The system has a displacement accuracy of up to 200 times the optical spatial resolution, matching that achievable with commercial systems. The surface strain calculations are benchmarked against commercially available software before being deployed on quasi-static tests showcasing the ability to detect both in- and out-of-plane motion. Finally, a high strain-rate (1.2$\times$10$^3$ s$^{-1}$) test was performed on a top-hat sample compressed in a split-Hopkinson pressure bar in order to highlight the inherent camera synchronisation and ability to resolve the adiabatic shear band phenomenon.
  • PDF
    Photosynthesis is the basic process used by plants to convert light energy in reaction centers into chemical energy. The high efficiency of this process is not yet understood today. Using the formalism for the description of open quantum systems by means of a non-Hermitian Hamilton operator, we consider initially the interplay of gain (acceptor) and loss (donor). Near singular points it causes fluctuations of the cross section which appear without any excitation of internal degrees of freedom of the system. This process occurs therefore very quickly and with high efficiency. We then consider the excitation of resonance states of the system by means of these fluctuations. This second step of the whole process takes place much slower than the first one, because it involves the excitation of internal degrees of freedom of the system. The two-step process as a whole is highly efficient and the decay is bi-exponential. We provide, if possible, the results of analytical studies, otherwise characteristic numerical results. The similarities of the obtained results to light harvesting in photosynthetic organisms is discussed.
  • PDF
    The round trip time of the light pulse limits the maximum detectable frequency response range of vibration in phase-sensitive optical time domain reflectometry (\phi-OTDR). We propose a method to break the bandwidth barrier of \phi-OTDR system by modulating the light pulse interval randomly, which enables a random sampling for every vibration point in a long sensing fiber. This sub-Nyquist randomized sampling method is suits for detecting sparse-wideband-frequency vibration signals. Up to MHz resonance vibration signal with over dozens of frequency components and 1.153MHz single frequency vibration signal are clearly identified for a sensing range of 9.6km with 10kHz maximum sampling rate.
  • PDF
    We propose a model of tunable THz metamaterials. The main advantage is the blueshift of resonance and phase tunability due to toroidal excitation in planar metallic metamolecules with incorporated silicon inductive inclusions.
  • PDF
    Quantum field theory predicts that a spatially homogeneous but temporally varying medium will excite photon pairs out of the vacuum state. However, this important theoretical prediction lacks experimental verification due to the difficulty in attaining the required non-adiabatic and large amplitude changes in the medium. Recent work has shown that in epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) materials it is possible to optically induce changes of the refractive index of the order of unity, in femtosecond timescales. By studying the quantum field theory of a spatially homogeneous, time-varying ENZ medium, we theoretically predict photon pair production that is up to several orders of magnitude larger than in non-ENZ time-varying materials. We also find that whilst in standard materials the emission spectrum depends on the time scale of the perturbation, in ENZ materials the emission is always peaked at the ENZ wavelength. These studies pave the way to technologically feasible observation of photon pair emission from a time-varying background with implications for quantum field theories beyond condensed matter systems and with potential applications as a new source of entangled light.
  • PDF
    We examine the dynamics associated with the miscibility-immiscibility transition of trapped two-component Bose-Einstein condensates (TBECs) of dilute atomic gases in presence of vortices. In particular, we consider TBECs of Rb hyperfine states, and Rb-Cs mixture. There is an enhancement of the phase-separation when the vortex is present in both condensates. In the case of a singly charged vortex in only one of the condensates, there is enhancement when the vortex is present in the species which occupy the edges at phase-separation. But, suppression occurs when the vortex is in the species which occupies the core region. To examine the role of the vortex, we quench the inter-species interactions to propel the TBEC from miscible to immiscible phase, and use the time dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation to probe the phenomenon of phase-separation. We also examine the effect of higher charged vortex.
  • PDF
    This study focuses on investigating the manner in which a prompt quarantine measure suppresses epidemics in networks. A simple and ideal quarantine measure is considered in which an individual is detected with a probability immediately after it becomes infected and the detected one and its neighbors are promptly isolated. The efficiency of this quarantine in suppressing a susceptible-infected-removed (SIR) model is tested in random graphs and uncorrelated scale-free networks. Monte Carlo simulations are used to show that the prompt quarantine measure outperforms random and acquaintance preventive vaccination schemes in terms of reducing the number of infected individuals. The epidemic threshold for the SIR model is analytically derived under the quarantine measure, and the theoretical findings indicate that prompt executions of quarantines are highly effective in containing epidemics. Even if infected individuals are detected with a very low probability, the SIR model under a prompt quarantine measure has finite epidemic thresholds in fat-tailed scale-free networks in which an infected individual can always cause an outbreak of a finite relative size without any measure. The numerical simulations also demonstrate that the present quarantine measure is effective in suppressing epidemics in real networks.
  • PDF
    Isostatic equilibrium is commonly understood to be the state of equilibrium--neglecting mantle dynamics and the slow relaxation of the crust--achieved when there are no lateral gradients in hydrostatic or lithostatic pressure, and thus no lateral flow, at depth within the lower viscosity mantle that underlies the outer crust of a planetary body. In a constant-gravity Cartesian framework, this definition is equivalent to the requirement that columns of equal width contain equal masses. Here we show, however, that this equivalence breaks down when the spherical geometry of the problem is taken into account. Imposing the 'equal masses' requirement in a spherical geometry, as is commonly done in the literature, leads to significant lateral pressure gradients along internal equipotential surfaces, and thus corresponds to a state of disequilibrium. Compared with the 'equal pressures' model we present here, the 'equal masses' model always leads to an overestimate of the compensation depth. The magnitude of the discrepancy depends on the density structure of the body and the wavelength of the relevant topography, and is most pronounced when the compensation depth is a substantial fraction of the body's radius. Compared with the 'equal pressures' model, we show that analyses incorporating the 'equal masses' model may overestimate crustal thicknesses by as much as ~27% in the case of the lunar highlands, by ~10% in the case of the Martian highlands, and by nearly a factor of two in the case of Saturn's small icy moon Enceladus.
  • PDF
    Ultrafast electronic dynamics in solids lies at the core of modern condensed matter and materials physics. To build up a practical ab initio method in this field, we develop the momentum-resolved real-time time dependent density functional theory (rt-TDDFT), together with the implementation of length gauge electromagnetic field. When applied to simulate elementary excitation in graphene, different excitation modes, only distinguishable in momentum space, are observed. The momentum-resolved rt-TDDFT is important and efficient for the study of ultrafast dynamics in extended systems.
  • PDF
    At the forefront of nanochemistry, there exists a research endeavor centered around intermetallic nanocrystals, which are unique in terms of long-range atomic ordering, well-defined stoichiometry, and controlled crystal structure. In contrast to alloy nanocrystals with no atomic ordering, it has been challenging to synthesize intermetallic nanocrystals with a tight control over their size and shape. This review article highlights recent progress in the synthesis of intermetallic nanocrystals with controllable sizes and well-defined shapes. We begin with a simple analysis and some insights key to the selection of experimental conditions for generating intermetallic nanocrystals. We then present examples to highlight the viable use of intermetallic nanocrystals as electrocatalysts or catalysts for various reactions, with a focus on the enhanced performance relative to their alloy counterparts that lack atomic ordering. We conclude with perspectives on future developments in the context of synthetic control, structure-property relationship, and application.
  • PDF
    We briefly elaborate the concept of electrochemical kinetics firstly, and introduce a method to separate current from potential sweep method of electrochemical kinetics for supercapacitors. The current in CV curves has been separated by equating the intercepts of the equation itotal=Cv+ip for EDLC, and by equating the slopes of the equation for pseudocapacitance.
  • PDF
    The high granularity of the CALICE Semi-Digital Hadronic CALorimeter (SDHCAL) provides the capability to reveal the track segments present in hadronic showers. These segments are then used as a tool to probe the behaviour of the active layers in situ, to better reconstruct the energy of these hadronic showers and also to distinguish them from electromagnetic ones. In addition, the comparison of these track segments in data and the simulation helps to discriminate among the different shower models used in the simulation. To extract the track segments in the showers recorded in the SDHCAL, a Hough Transform is used after being adapted to the presence of the dense core of the hadronic showers and the SDHCAL active medium structure.
  • PDF
    It is suggested that the observed scale-free correlations of speed fluctuations in flocks of birds are a consequence of the spontaneous breakdown of translational symmetry to a discrete group, and not an indication that the system is near a critical point in phase space. The observed long-range correlation length could then be attributed to the presence of a phonon mode in the flock.
  • PDF
    Understanding the statistics of ocean geostrophic turbulence is of utmost importance in understanding its interactions with the global ocean circulation and the climate system as a whole. Here, a study of eddy-mixing entropy in a forced-dissipative barotropic ocean model is presented. Entropy is a concept of fundamental importance in statistical physics and information theory; motivated by equilibrium statistical mechanics theories of ideal geophysical fluids, we consider the effect of forcing and dissipation on eddy-mixing entropy, both analytically and numerically. By diagnosing the time evolution of eddy-mixing entropy it is shown that the entropy provides a descriptive tool for understanding three stages of the turbulence life cycle: growth of instability, formation of large scale structures and steady state fluctuations. Further, by determining the relationship between the time evolution of entropy and the maximum entropy principle, evidence is found for the action of this principle in a forced-dissipative flow. The maximum entropy potential vorticity statistics are calculated for the flow and are compared with numerical simulations. Deficiencies of the maximum entropy statistics are discussed in the context of the mean-field approximation for energy. This study highlights the importance entropy and statistical mechanics in the study of geostrophic turbulence.
  • PDF
    To investigate the existence of sterile neutrino, we propose a new neutrino production method using $^{13}$C beams and a $^{9}$Be target for short-baseline electron antineutrino (${\bar{\nu}}_{e}$) disappearance study. The production of secondary unstable isotopes which can emit neutrinos from the $^{13}$C + $^{9}$Be reaction is calculated with three different nucleus-nucleus (AA) reaction models. Different isotope yields are obtained using these models, but the results of the neutrino flux are found to have unanimous similarities. This feature gives an opportunity to study neutrino oscillation through shape analysis. In this work, expected neutrino flux and event rates are discussed in detail through intensive simulation of the light ion collision reaction and the neutrino flux from the beta decay of unstable isotopes followed by this collision. Together with the reactor and accelerator anomalies, the present proposed ${\bar{\nu}}_{e}$ source is shown to be a practically alternative test of the existence of the $\Delta m^{2}$ $\sim$ 1 eV$^{2}$ scale sterile neutrino.
  • PDF
    1D lattice summations of the 3D Green's function are needed in many applications such as photonic crystals, antenna arrays, and so on. Such summations are usually divided into two cases, depending on the location of the observer: Out of the summation axis, or on the summation axis. Here, as a service for the community, we present and summarize the summation formulas for both cases. On the summation axis, we use polylogarithmic functions to express the summation, and Away from the summation axis we use Poisson summation (equivalent to the expansion of the field to cylindrical harmonics)
  • PDF
    We study Frenkel exciton-polariton Bose-Einstein condensation in a two-dimensional defect-free triangular photonic crystal with an organic semiconductor active medium containing bound excitons with dipole moments oriented perpendicular to the layers. We find photonic Bloch modes of the structure and consider their strong coupling regime with the excitonic component. Using the Gross- Pitaevskii equation for exciton polaritons and the Boltzmann equation for the external exciton reservoir, we demonstrate the formation of condensate at the points in reciprocal space where photon group velocity equals zero. Further, we demonstrate condensation at non-zero momentum states for TM-polarized photons in the case of a system with incoherent pumping, and show that the condensation threshold varies for different points in the reciprocal space, controlled by detuning.
  • PDF
    Moving bottlenecks, such as slow-driving vehicles, are commonly thought of as impediments to efficient traffic flow. Here, we demonstrate that in certain situations, moving bottlenecks---properly controlled---can actually be beneficial for the traffic flow, in that they reduce the overall fuel consumption, without imposing any delays on the other vehicles. As an important practical example, we study a fixed bottleneck (e.g., an accident) that has occurred further downstream. This new possibility of traffic control is particularly attractive with autonomous vehicles, which (a) will have fast access to non-local information, such as incidents and congestion downstream; and (b) can execute driving protocols accurately.
  • PDF
    We demonstrate photon counting at 1550 nm wavelength using microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) made from TiN/Ti/TiN trilayer films with superconducting transition temperature Tc ~ 1.4 K. The detectors have a lumped-element design with a large interdigitated capacitor (IDC) covered by aluminum and inductive photon absorbers whose volume ranges from 0.4 um^3 to 20 um^3. We find that the energy resolution improves as the absorber volume is reduced. We have achieved an energy resolution of 0.22 eV and resolved up to 7 photons per pulse, both greatly improved from previously reported results at 1550 nm wavelength using MKIDs. Further improvements are possible by optimizing the optical coupling to maximize photon absorption into the inductive absorber.
  • PDF
    Our visual perception of our surroundings is ultimately limited by the diffraction limit, which stipulates that optical information smaller than roughly half the illumination wavelength is not retrievable. Over the past decades, many breakthroughs have led to unprecedented imaging capabilities beyond the diffraction limit, with applications in biology and nanotechnology. Over the past decades, many breakthroughs have led to unprecedented imaging capabilities beyond the diffraction-limit, with applications in biology and nanotechnology. In this context, nano-photonics has revolutionized the field of optics in recent years by enabling the manipulation of light-matter interaction with subwavelength structures. However, despite the many advances in this field, its impact and penetration in our daily life has been hindered by a convoluted and iterative process, cycling through modeling, nanofabrication and nano-characterization. The fundamental reason is the fact that not only the prediction of the optical response is very time consuming and requires solving Maxwell's equations with dedicated numerical packages. But, more significantly, the inverse problem, i.e. designing a nanostructure with an on-demand optical response, is currently a prohibitive task even with the most advanced numerical tools due to the high non-linearity of the problem. Here, we harness the power of Deep Learning, a new path in modern machine learning, and show its ability to predict the geometry of nanostructures based solely on their far-field response. This approach also addresses in a direct way the currently inaccessible inverse problem breaking the ground for on-demand design of optical response with applications such as sensing, imaging and also for and also for plasmon's mediated cancer thermotherapy.
  • PDF
    Comprehensive Two dimensional gas chromatography (GCxGC) plays a central role into the elucidation of complex samples. The automation of the identification of peak areas is of prime interest to obtain a fast and repeatable analysis of chromatograms. To determine the concentration of compounds or pseudo-compounds, templates of blobs are defined and superimposed on a reference chromatogram. The templates then need to be modified when different chromatograms are recorded. In this study, we present a chromatogram and template alignment method based on peak registration called BARCHAN. Peaks are identified using a robust mathematical morphology tool. The alignment is performed by a probabilistic estimation of a rigid transformation along the first dimension, and a non-rigid transformation in the second dimension, taking into account noise, outliers and missing peaks in a fully automated way. Resulting aligned chromatograms and masks are presented on two datasets. The proposed algorithm proves to be fast and reliable. It significantly reduces the time to results for GCxGC analysis.
  • PDF
    Native electrospray ionization/ion mobility-mass spectrometry (ESI/IM-MS) allows an accurate determination of low-resolution structural features of proteins. Yet, the presence of proton dynamics, observed already by us for DNA in the gas phase, and its impact on protein structural determinants, have not been investigated so far. Here, we address this issue by a multi-step simulation strategy on a pharmacologically relevant peptide, the N-terminal residues of amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta(1-16)). Our calculations reproduce the experimental maximum charge state from ESI-MS and are also in fair agreement with collision cross section (CCS) data measured here by ESI/IM-MS. Although the main structural features are preserved, subtle conformational changes do take place in the first ~0.1 ms of dynamics. In addition, intramolecular proton dynamics processes occur on the ps-timescale in the gas phase as emerging from quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations at the B3LYP level of theory. We conclude that proton transfer phenomena do occur frequently during fly time in ESI-MS experiments (typically on the ms timescale). However, the structural changes associated with the process do not significantly affect the structural determinants.
  • PDF
    Earthquakes cannot be predicted with precision, but algorithms exist for intermediate-term middle range prediction of main shocks above a pre-assigned threshold, based on seismicity patterns. Few years ago, a first attempt was made in the framework of project SISMA, funded by Italian Space Agency, to jointly use seismological tools, like CN algorithm and scenario earthquakes, and geodetic methods and techniques, like GPS and SAR monitoring, in order to effectively constrain priority areas where to concentrate prevention and seismic risk mitigation. We present a further development of integration of seismological and geodetic information, clearly showing the contribution of geodesy to the understanding and prediction of earthquakes. As a relevant application, the seismic crisis that started in Central Italy in August 2016 is considered in a retrospective analysis. Differently from the much more common approach, here GPS data are not used to estimate the standard 2D velocity and strain field in the area, but to reconstruct the velocity and strain pattern along transects, which are properly oriented according to the a priori information about the known tectonic setting. Overall, the analysis of the available geodetic data indicates that it is possible to highlight the velocity variation and the related strain accumulation in the area of Amatrice event, within the area alarmed by CN since November 1st, 2012. The considered counter examples, across CN alarmed and not-alarmed areas, do not show any comparable spatial acceleration localized trend. Therefore, we show that the combined analysis of the results of CN prediction algorithms, with those from the processing of adequately dense and permanent GNSS network data, may allow the routine highlight in advance of the strain accumulation. Thus it is possible to significantly reduce the size of the CN alarmed areas.
  • PDF
    A split feasibility formulation for the inverse problem of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning with dose-volume constraints (DVCs) included in the planning algorithm is presented. It involves a new type of sparsity constraint that enables the inclusion of a percentage-violation constraint in the model problem and its handling by continuous (as opposed to integer) methods. We propose an iterative algorithmic framework for solving such a problem by applying the feasibility-seeking CQ-algorithm of Byrne combined with the automatic relaxation method (ARM) that uses cyclic projections. Detailed implementation instructions are furnished. Functionality of the algorithm was demonstrated through the creation of an intensity-modulated proton therapy plan for a simple 2D C-shaped geometry and also for a realistic base-of-skull chordoma treatment site. Monte Carlo simulations of proton pencil beams of varying energy were conducted to obtain dose distributions for the 2D test case. A research release of the Pinnacle3 proton treatment planning system was used to extract pencil beam doses for a clinical base-of-skull chordoma case. In both cases the beamlet doses were calculated to satisfy dose-volume constraints according to our new algorithm. Examination of the dose-volume histograms following inverse planning with our algorithm demonstrated that it performed as intended. The application of our proposed algorithm to dose-volume constraint inverse planning was successfully demonstrated. Comparison with optimized dose distributions from the research release of the Pinnacle3 treatment planning system showed the algorithm could achieve equivalent or superior results.
  • PDF
    In this paper, we propose a novel generic model of opinion dynamics over a social network, in the presence of communication among the users leading to interpersonal influence i.e., peer pressure. Each individual in the social network has a distinct objective function representing a weighted sum of internal and external pressures. We prove conditions under which a connected group of users converges to a fixed opinion distribution, and under which conditions the group reaches consensus. Through simulation, we study the rate of convergence on large scale-free networks as well as the impact of user stubbornness on convergence in a simple political model.
  • PDF
    Global and partial synchronization are the two distinctive forms of synchronization in coupled oscillators and have been well studied in the past decades. Recent attention on synchronization is focused on the chimera state (CS) and explosive synchronization (ES), but little attention has been paid to their relationship. We here study this topic by presenting a model to bridge these two phenomena, which consists of two groups of coupled oscillators and its coupling strength is adaptively controlled by a local order parameter. We find that this model displays either CS or ES in two limits. In between the two limits, this model exhibits both CS and ES, where CS can be observed for a fixed coupling strength and ES appears when the coupling is increased adiabatically. Moreover, we show both theoretically and numerically that there are a variety of CS basin patterns for the case of identical oscillators, depending on the distributions of both the initial order parameters and the initial average phases. This model suggests a way to easily observe CS, in contrast to others models having some (weak or strong) dependence on initial conditions.
  • PDF
    Donut-shaped laser radiation, carrying orbital angular momentum, namely optical vortex, recently was shown to provide vectorial mass transfer, twisting transiently molten material and producing chiral micro-scale structures on surfaces of different bulk materials upon their resolidification. In this paper, we show for the first time that nanosecond laser vortices can produce chiral nanoneedles (nanojets) of variable size on thin films of such plasmonic materials, as silver and gold films, covering thermally insulating substrates. Main geometric parameters of the produced chiral nanojets, such as height and aspect ratio, were shown to be tunable in a wide range by varying metal film thickness, supporting substrates, and the optical size of the vortex beam. Donut-shaped vortex nanosecond laser pulses, carrying two vortices with opposite handedness, were demonstrated to produce two chiral nanojets twisted in opposite directions. The results provide new important insights into fundamental physics of the vectorial laser-beam assisted mass transfer in metal films and demonstrate the great potential of this technique for fast easy-to-implement fabrication of chiral plasmonic nanostructures.
  • PDF
    Influencing various aspects of human activity, migration is associated also with language formation. To examine the mutual interaction of these processes, we study a Naming Game with migrating agents. The dynamics of the model leads to formation of low-mobility clusters, which turns out to break the symmetry of the Naming Game by favouring low-mobility languages. High-mobility languages are gradually eliminated from the system and the dynamics of language formation considerably slows down.
  • PDF
    We have studied the peculiarities of selective reflection from Rb vapor cell with thickness $L <$ 70 nm, which is over an order of magnitude smaller than the resonant wavelength for Rb atomic D$_1$ line $\lambda$ = 795 nm. A huge ($\approx$ 240 MHz) red shift and spectral broadening of reflection signal is recorded for $L =$ 40 nm caused by the atom-surface interaction. Also completely frequency resolved hyperfine Paschen-Back splitting of atomic transitions to four components for $^{87}$Rb and six components for $^{85}$Rb is recorded in strong magnetic field ($B >$ 2 kG).
  • PDF
    The transmission of low-energy (<1.8eV) photoelectrons through the shell of core-shell aerosol particles is studied for liquid squalane, squalene, and DEHS shells. The photoelectrons are exclusively formed in the core of the particles by two-photon ionization. The total photoelectron yield recorded as a function of shell thickness (1-80nm) shows a bi-exponential attenuation. For all substances, the damping parameter for shell thicknesses below 15nm lies between 8 and 9nm, and is tentatively assigned to the electron attenuation length at electron kinetic energies of ~0.5-1eV. The significantly larger damping parameters for thick shells (> 20nm) are presumably a consequence of distorted core-shell structures. A first comparison of aerosol and traditional thin film overlayer methods is provided.

Recent comments

Stefano Pirandola Nov 30 2016 06:45 UTC

Dear Mark, thx for your comment. There are indeed missing citations to previous works by Rafal, Janek and Lorenzo that we forgot to add. Regarding your paper, I did not read it in detail but I have two main comments:

1- What you are using is completely equivalent to the tool of "quantum simulatio

...(continued)
Mark M. Wilde Nov 30 2016 02:18 UTC

An update http://arxiv.org/abs/1609.02160v2 of this paper has appeared, one day after the arXiv post http://arxiv.org/abs/1611.09165 . The paper http://arxiv.org/abs/1609.02160v2 now includes (without citation) some results for bosonic Gaussian channels found independently in http://arxiv.org/abs/16

...(continued)
wiadealo Nov 07 2016 09:27 UTC

Is it [fantasy][1] or real?

[1]: http://buchderfarben.de

Mark M. Wilde Oct 06 2016 15:44 UTC

The following paper found a setting in which adaptive operations do not help in quantum channel discrimination:

https://arxiv.org/abs/1408.3373

It is published as

Communications in Mathematical Physics, vol. 344, no. 3, pages 797-829, June 2016

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2

...(continued)
Ovidiu Racorean Oct 05 2016 10:31 UTC

Spinning black holes are capable to implement complex quantum information processes with qubits encoded in the X-ray photons emitted by the accretion disk.

climaiw Sep 12 2016 16:19 UTC

I would suggest planets where life can really make a difference.

Mohammad Bavarian Sep 08 2016 03:58 UTC

So beautifully written!

Māris Ozols Sep 07 2016 13:03 UTC

John also has an excellent series of 7 blog posts covering this material:
https://www.physicsforums.com/insights/struggles-continuum-part-1/

resodiat Aug 23 2016 13:00 UTC

That is really a long-term perspective.