More Physics (physics)

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    We compare the social character networks of biographical, legendary and fictional texts, in search of statistical marks of historical information. We examine the frequency of character appearance and find a Zipf Law that does not depend on the literary genera and historical content. We also examine global and local complex networks indexes, in particular, correlation plots between the recently introduced Lobby (or Hirsh $H(1)$) index and Degree, Betweenness and Closeness centralities. We also found no relevant differences in the books for these network indexes. We discovered, however, that a very simple index based in the Hapax Legomena phenomenon (names cited a single time along the text) that seems to have the potential of separating pure fiction from legendary and biographical texts.
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    We demonstrate the fabrication of photonic crystal nanobeam cavities with rectangular cross section into bulk diamond. In simulation, these cavities have an unloaded quality factor (Q) of over 1 million. Measured cavity resonances show fundamental modes with spectrometer-limited quality factors larger than 14,000 within 1nm of the NV center's zero phonon line at 637nm. We find high cavity yield across the full diamond chip with deterministic resonance trends across the fabricated parameter sweeps.
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    Understanding how ideas relate to each other is a fundamental question in many domains, ranging from intellectual history to public communication. Because ideas are naturally embedded in texts, we propose the first framework to systematically characterize the relations between ideas based on their occurrence in a corpus of documents, independent of how these ideas are represented. Combining two statistics --- cooccurrence within documents and prevalence correlation over time --- our approach reveals a number of different ways in which ideas can cooperate and compete. For instance, two ideas can closely track each other's prevalence over time, and yet rarely cooccur, almost like a "cold war" scenario. We observe that pairwise cooccurrence and prevalence correlation exhibit different distributions. We further demonstrate that our approach is able to uncover intriguing relations between ideas through in-depth case studies on news articles and research papers.
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    Hybrid systems of cold atoms and optical cavities are promising systems for increasing the stability of laser oscillators used in quantum metrology and atomic clocks. In this paper we map out the atom-cavity dynamics in such a system and demonstrate limitations as well as robustness of the approach. We investigate the phase response of an ensemble of cold strontium-88 atoms inside an optical cavity for use as an error signal in laser frequency stabilization. With this system we realize a regime where the high atomic phase-shift limits the dynamical locking range. The limitation is caused by the cavity transfer function relating input field to output field. However, the cavity dynamics is shown to have only little influence on the prospects for laser stabilization making the system robust towards cavity fluctuations and ideal for the improvement of future narrow linewidth lasers.
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    The synthesis of non-magnetic 2D dielectric cloaks as proper solutions of an inverse scattering problem is addressed in this paper. Adopting the relevant integral formulation governing the scattering phenomena, analytic and numerical approaches are exploited to provide new insights on how frequency and direction of arrival of the incoming wave may influence the cloaking mechanism in terms of permittivity distribution within the cover region. In quasi-static (subwavelength) regime a solution is analytically derived in terms of homogeneous artificial dielectric cover with $\varepsilon<\varepsilon_0$ which is found to be a necessary and sufficient condition for achieving omnidirectional cloaking. On the other hand, beyond quasi-static regime, the cloaking problem is addressed as an optimization task looking for only natural dielectric coatings with $\varepsilon>\varepsilon_0$ able to hide the object for a given number of directions of the incident field. Simulated results confirm the validity of both analytic and numerical methodologies and allow to estimate effective bandwidths both in terms of frequency range and direction of arrival of the impinging field.
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    Proposed near-future upgrades of the current advanced interferometric gravitational wave detectors include the usage of frequency dependent squeezed light to reduce the current sensitivity-limiting quantum noise. We quantify and describe the downgrading effects that spatial mode mismatches have on the squeezed field. We also show that squeezing the second-order Hermite-Gaussian modes $\mathrm{HG}_{02}$ and $\mathrm{HG}_{20}$, in addition to the fundamental mode, has the potential to increase the robustness to spatial mode mismatches. This scheme, however, requires independently optimised squeeze angles for each squeezed spatial mode, which would be challenging to realise in practise.
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    Organic material in anoxic sediment represents a globally significant carbon reservoir that acts to stabilize Earth's atmospheric composition. The dynamics by which microbes organize to consume this material remain poorly understood. Here we observe the collective dynamics of a microbial community, collected from a salt marsh, as it comes to steady state in a two-dimensional ecosystem, covered by flowing water and under constant illumination. Microbes form a very thin front at the oxic-anoxic interface that moves towards the surface with constant velocity and comes to rest at a fixed depth. Fronts are stable to all perturbations while in the sediment, but develop bioconvective plumes in water. We observe the transient formation of parallel fronts. We model these dynamics to understand how they arise from the coupling between metabolism, aerotaxis, and diffusion. These results identify the typical timescale for the oxygen flux and penetration depth to reach steady state.
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    In line with its terms of reference the ICFA Neutrino Panel has developed a roadmapfor the international, accelerator-based neutrino programme. A "roadmap discussion document" was presented in May 2016 taking into account the peer-group-consultation described in the Panel's initial report. The "roadmap discussion document" was used to solicit feedback from the neutrino community---and more broadly, the particle- and astroparticle-physics communities---and the various stakeholders in the programme. The roadmap, the conclusions and recommendations presented in this document take into account the comments received following the publication of the roadmap discussion document. With its roadmap the Panel documents the approved objectives and milestones of the experiments that are presently in operation or under construction. Approval, construction and exploitation milestones are presented for experiments that are being considered for approval. The timetable proposed by the proponents is presented for experiments that are not yet being considered formally for approval. Based on this information, the evolution of the precision with which the critical parameters governinger the neutrino are known has been evaluated. Branch or decision points have been identified based on the anticipated evolution in precision. The branch or decision points have in turn been used to identify desirable timelines for the neutrino-nucleus cross section and hadro-production measurements that are required to maximise the integrated scientific output of the programme. The branch points have also been used to identify the timeline for the R&D required to take the programme beyond the horizon of the next generation of experiments. The theory and phenomenology programme, including nuclear theory, required to ensure that maximum benefit is derived from the experimental programme is also discussed.
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    This paper will detail changes in the operational paradigm of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) magnetron $H^{-}$ ion source due to upgrades in the accelerator system. Prior to November of 2012 the $H^{-}$ ions for High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments were extracted at ~18 keV vertically downward into a 90 degree bending magnet and accelerated through a Cockcroft-Walton accelerating column to 750 keV. Following the upgrade in the fall of 2012 the $H^{-}$ ions are now directly extracted from a magnetron at 35 keV and accelerated to 750 keV by a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). This change in extraction energy as well as the orientation of the ion source required not only a redesign of the ion source, but an updated understanding of its operation at these new values. Discussed in detail are the changes to the ion source timing, arc discharge current, hydrogen gas pressure, and cesium delivery system that were needed to maintain consistent operation at >99% uptime for HEP, with an increased ion source lifetime of over 9 months.
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    The magnetron-style $H^{-}$ ion sources currently in operation at Fermilab use piezoelectric gas valves to function. This kind of gas valve is sensitive to small changes in ambient temperature, which affect the stability and performance of the ion source. This motivates the need to find an alternative way of feeding H2 gas into the source. A solenoid-type gas valve has been characterized in a dedicated off-line test stand to assess the feasibility of its use in the operational ion sources. $H^{-}$ ion beams have been extracted at 35 keV using this valve. In this study, the performance of the solenoid gas valve has been characterized measuring the beam current output of the magnetron source with respect to the voltage and pulse width of the signal applied to the gas valve.
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    Fermilab is committed to upgrade its accelerator complex to support HEP experiments at the intensity frontier. The ongoing Proton Improvement Plan (PIP) enables us to reach 700 kW beam power on the NuMI neutrino targets. By the end of the next decade, the current 400 MeV normal conducting LINAC will be replaced by an 800 MeV superconducting LINAC (PIP-II) with an increased beam power >50% of the PIP design goal. Both in PIP and PIP-II era, the existing Booster is going to play a very significant role, at least for next two decades. In the meanwhile, we have recently developed an innovative beam injection and bunching scheme for the Booster called "early injection scheme" that continues to use the existing 400 MeV LINAC and implemented into operation. This scheme has the potential to increase the Booster beam intensity by >40% from the PIP design goal. Some benefits from the scheme have already been seen. In this paper, I will describe the basic principle of the scheme, results from recent beam experiments, our experience with the new scheme in operation, current status, issues and future plans. This scheme fits well with the current and future intensity upgrade programs at Fermilab.
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    Background The nuclear structure of the cluster bands in $^{20}$Ne presents a challenge for different theoretical approaches. It is especially difficult to explain the broad 0$^+$, 2$^+$ states at 9 MeV excitation energy. Simultaneously, it is important to obtain more reliable experimental data for these levels in order to quantitatively assess the theoretical framework. Purpose To obtain new data on $^{20}$Ne $\alpha$ cluster structure. Method Thick target inverse kinematics technique was used to study the $^{16}$O+$\alpha$ resonance elastic scattering and the data were analyzed using an \textitR matrix approach. The $^{20}$Ne spectrum, the cluster and nucleon spectroscopic factors were calculated using cluster-nucleon configuration interaction model (CNCIM). Results We determined the parameters of the broad resonances in \textsuperscript20Ne: 0$^+$ level at 8.77 $\pm$ 0.150 MeV with a width of 750 (+500/-220) keV; 2$^+$ level at 8.75 $\pm$ 0.100 MeV with the width of 695 $\pm$ 120 keV; the width of 9.48 MeV level of 65 $\pm$ 20 keV and showed that 9.19 MeV, 2$^+$ level (if exists) should have width $\leq$ 10 keV. The detailed comparison of the theoretical CNCIM predictions with the experimental data on cluster states was made. Conclusions Our experimental results by the TTIK method generally confirm the adopted data on $\alpha$ cluster levels in $^{20}$Ne. The CNCIM gives a good description of the $^{20}$Ne positive parity states up to an excitation energy of $\sim$ 7 MeV, predicting reasonably well the excitation energy of the states and their cluster and single particle properties. At higher excitations, the qualitative disagreement with the experimentally observed structure is evident, especially for broad resonances.
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    Phase retrieval is one of the most challenging processes in many interferometry techniques. To promote the phase retrieval, Xu et. al [X. Xu, Y. Wang, Y. Xu, W. Jin. 2016] proposed a method based on dual-wavelength interferometry. However, the phase-difference brings large noise due to its low sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Beside, special phase shifts are required in Xu's method. In the light of these problems, an extended depth-range dual-wavelength phase-shifting interferometry is proposed. Firstly, the least squares algorithm is utilized to retrieve the single-wavelength phase from a sequence of N-frame simultaneous phase-shifting dual-wavelength interferograms (SPSDWI) with random phase shifts. Then the phase-difference and phase-sum are calculated from the wrapped phases of single wavelength, and the iterative two-step temporal phase-unwrapping is introduced to unwrap the phase-sum, which can extend the depth-range and improve the sensitivity. Finally, the height of objects is achieved. Simulated experiments are conducted to demonstrate the superb precision and overall performance of the proposed method.
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    In this contribution, we extend our framework for analyzing and visualizing correlated many-electron dynamics to non-variational, highly scalable electronic structure method. Specifically, an explicitly time-dependent electronic wave packet is written as a linear combination of $N$-electron wave functions at the configuration interaction singles (CIS) level, which are obtained from a reference time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculation. The procedure is implemented in the open-source Python program detCI@ORBKIT, which extends the capabilities of our recently published post-processing toolbox [J. Comput. Chem. 37 (2016) 1511]. From the output of standard quantum chemistry packages using atom-centered Gaussian-type basis functions, the framework exploits the multi-determinental structure of the hybrid TDDFT/CIS wave packet to compute fundamental one-electron quantities such as difference electronic densities, transient electronic flux densities, and transition dipole moments. The hybrid scheme is benchmarked against wave function data for the laser-driven state selective excitation in LiH. It is shown that all features of the electron dynamics are in good quantitative agreement with the higher-level method provided a judicious choice of functional is made. Broadband excitation of a medium-sized organic chromophore further demonstrates the scalability of the method. In addition, the time-dependent flux densities unravel the mechanistic details of the simulated charge migration process at a glance.
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    Advances in ultra-intense laser technology are enabling, for the first time, relativistic intensities at mid-infrared (mid-IR) wavelengths. Anticipating further experimental research in this domain, we present high-resolution two dimensional Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulation results using the Large- Scale Plasma (LSP) code that explore intense mid-IR laser interactions with dense targets. We present the results of thirty PIC simulations over a wide range of intensities (0.03 < $a_0$ < 39) and wavelengths (\lambda =780 nm, 3 \mum, and 10 \mum). Earlier studies, limited to \lambda =780 nm and $a_0 \sim$ 1 [1, 2], identified super-ponderomotive electron acceleration in the laser specular direction for normal- incidence laser interactions with dense targets. We extend this research to mid-IR wavelengths and find a more general result that normal-incidence super-ponderomotive electron acceleration occurs provided that the laser intensity is not highly relativistic ($a_0 \lesssim 1$) and that the pre-plasma scale length is similar to or longer than the laser wavelength. Under these conditions, ejected electron angular and energy distributions are similar to expectations from an analytic model used in [2]. We also find that, for $a_0 \sim 1$, the mid-IR simulations exhibit a classic ponderomotive steepening pattern with multiple peaks in the ion and electron density distribution. Experimental validation of this basic laser-plasma interaction process will be possible in the near future using mid-IR laser technology and interferometry.
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    We consider the problem of inferring the probability distribution of flux configurations in metabolic network models from empirical flux data. For the simple case in which experimental averages are to be retrieved, data are described by a Boltzmann-like distribution ($\propto e^{F/T}$) where $F$ is a linear combination of fluxes and the `temperature' parameter $T\geq 0$ allows for fluctuations. The zero-temperature limit corresponds to a Flux Balance Analysis scenario, where an objective function ($F$) is maximized. As a test, we have inverse modeled, by means of Boltzmann learning, the catabolic core of Escherichia coli in glucose-limited aerobic stationary growth conditions. Empirical means are best reproduced when $F$ is a simple combination of biomass production and glucose uptake and the temperature is finite, implying the presence of fluctuations. The scheme presented here has the potential to deliver new quantitative insight on cellular metabolism. Our implementation is however computationally intensive, and highlights the major role that effective algorithms to sample the high-dimensional solution space of metabolic networks can play in this field.
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    We report calculations of the one-loop self-energy correction to the bound-electron $g$ factor of the $1s$ and $2s$ states of light hydrogen-like ions with the nuclear charge number $Z \le 20$. The calculation is carried out to all orders in the binding nuclear strength. We find good agreement with previous calculations and improve their accuracy by about two orders of magnitude.
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    The WAGASCI experiment being built at the J-PARC neutrino beam line will measure the difference in cross sections from neutrinos interacting with a water and scintillator targets, in order to constrain neutrino cross sections, essential for the T2K neutrino oscillation measurements. A prototype Magnetised Iron Neutrino Detector (MIND), called Baby MIND, is being constructed at CERN to act as a magnetic spectrometer behind the main WAGASCI target to be able to measure the charge and momentum of the outgoing muon from neutrino charged current interactions.
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    Absorption of ultrashort laser pulses in a metallic grating deposited on a transparent sample launches coherent compression/dilatation acoustic pulses in directions of different orders of acoustic diffraction. Their propagation is detected by the delayed laser pulses, which are also diffracted by the metallic grating, through the measurement of the transient intensity change of the first order diffracted light. The obtained data contain multiple frequency components which are interpreted by considering all possible angles for the Brillouin scattering of light achieved through the multiplexing of the propagation directions of light and coherent sound by the metallic grating. The emitted acoustic field can be equivalently presented as a superposition of the plane inhomogeneous acoustic waves, which constitute an acoustic diffraction grating for the probe light. Thus, the obtained results can also be interpreted as a consequence of probe light diffraction by both metallic and acoustic gratings. The realized scheme of time-domain Brillouin scattering with metallic grating operating in reflection mode provides access to acoustic frequencies from the minimal to the maximal possible in a single experimental configuration for the directions of probe light incidence and scattered light detection. This is achieved by monitoring of the backward and forward Brillouin scattering processes in parallel. Applications include measurements of the acoustic dispersion, simultaneous determination of sound velocity and optical refractive index, and evaluation of the samples with a single direction of possible optical access.
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    Plants emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is involved in a wide class of ecological functions, as VOCs play a crucial role in plants interactions with biotic and abiotic factors. Accordingly, they vary widely across species and underpin differences in ecological strategy. In this paper, VOCs spontaneously emitted by 109 plant species (belonging to 56 different families) have been qualitatively and quantitatively analysed in order to classify plants species. By using bipartite networks methodology, based on recent advancements in Complex Network Theory, and through the application of complementary classical and advanced community detection algorithms, the possibility to classify species according to chemical classes such as terpenes and sulfur compounds is suggested. This indicates complex network analysis as an advantageous methodology to uncover plants relationships also related to the way they react to the environment where they evolve and adapt.
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    We report the three main ingredients to calculate three- and four-electron integrals over Gaussian basis functions involving Gaussian geminal operators: fundamental integrals, upper bounds, and recurrence relations. In particular, we consider the three- and four-electron integrals that may arise in explicitly-correlated F12 methods. A straightforward method to obtain the fundamental integrals is given. We derive vertical, transfer and horizontal recurrence relations to build up angular momentum over the centers. Strong, simple and scaling-consistent upper bounds are also reported. This latest ingredient allows to compute only the $\order{N^2}$ significant three- and four-electron integrals, avoiding the computation of the very large number of negligible integrals.
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    We present in this work a new reconstruction scheme, so-called MUSCL-THINC-BVD scheme, to solve the five-equation model for interfacial two phase flows. This scheme employs the traditional shock capturing MUSCL (Monotone Upstream-centered Schemes for Conservation Law) scheme as well as the interface sharpening THINC (Tangent of Hyperbola for INterface Capturing) scheme as two building-blocks of spatial reconstruction using the BVD (boundary variation diminishing) principle that minimizes the variations (jumps) of the reconstructed variables at cell boundaries, and thus effectively reduces the numerical dissipations in numerical solutions. The MUSCL-THINC-BVD scheme is implemented to all state variables and volume fraction, which realizes the consistency among volume fraction and other physical variables. Benchmark tests are carried out to verify the capability of the present method in capturing the material interface as a well-defined sharp jump in volume fraction, as well as significant improvement in solution quality. The proposed scheme is a simple and effective method of practical significance for simulating compressible interfacial multiphase flows.
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    Laterally periodic nanostructures were investigated with grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) by using the diffraction patterns to reconstruct the surface shape. To model visible light scattering, rigorous calculations of the near and far field by numerically solving Maxwell's equations with a finite-element method are well established. The application of this technique to X-rays is still challenging, due to the discrepancy between incident wavelength and finite-element size. This drawback vanishes for GISAXS due to the small angles of incidence, the conical scattering geometry and the periodicity of the surface structures, which allows a rigorous computation of the diffraction efficiencies with sufficient numerical precision. To develop dimensional metrology tools based on GISAXS, lamellar gratings with line widths down to 55 nm were produced by state-of-the-art e-beam lithography and then etched into silicon. The high surface sensitivity of GISAXS in conjunction with a Maxwell solver allows a detailed reconstruction of the grating line shape also for thick, non-homogeneous substrates. The reconstructed geometrical line shape models are statistically validated by applying a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling technique which reveals that GISAXS is able to reconstruct critical parameters like the widths of the lines with sub-nm uncertainty.
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    Complex networks have emerged as a simple yet powerful framework to represent and analyze a wide range of complex systems. The problem of ranking the nodes and the edges in complex networks is critical for a broad range of real-world problems because it affects how we access online information and products, how success and talent are evaluated in human activities, and how scarce resources are allocated by companies and policymakers, among others. This calls for a deep understanding of how existing ranking algorithms perform, and which are their possible biases that may impair their effectiveness. Well-established ranking algorithms (such as the popular Google's PageRank) are static in nature and, as a consequence, they exhibit important shortcomings when applied to real networks that rapidly evolve in time. The recent advances in the understanding and modeling of evolving networks have enabled the development of a wide and diverse range of ranking algorithms that take the temporal dimension into account. The aim of this review is to survey the existing ranking algorithms, both static and time-aware, and their applications to evolving networks. We emphasize both the impact of network evolution on well-established static algorithms and the benefits from including the temporal dimension for tasks such as prediction of real network traffic, prediction of future links, and identification of highly-significant nodes.
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    The use of geometrical constraints opens many new perspectives in photonics and in fundamental studies of nonlinear waves. By implementing surface structures in vertical cavity surface emitting lasers as manifolds for curved space, we experimentally study the impacts of geometrical constraints on nonlinear wave localization. We observe localized waves pinned to the maximal curvature in an elliptical-ring, and confirm the reduction in the localization length of waves by measuring near and far field patterns, as well as the corresponding dispersion relation. Theoretically, analyses based on a dissipative model with a parabola curve give good agreement remarkably to experimental measurement on the transition from delocalized to localized waves. The introduction of curved geometry allows to control and design lasing modes in the nonlinear regime.
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    In this study we investigate shallow turbidity density currents and underflows from mechanical point of view. We propose a simple hyperbolic model for such flows. On one hand, our model is based on very basic conservation principles. On the other hand, the turbulent nature of the flow is also taken into account through the energy dissipation mechanism. Moreover, the mixing with the pure water along with sediments entrainment and deposition processes are considered, which makes the problem dynamically interesting. One of the main advantages of our model is that it requires the specification of only two modeling parameters - the rate of turbulent dissipation and the rate of the pure water entrainment. Consequently, the resulting model turns out to be very simple and self-consistent. This model is validated against several experimental data and several special classes of solutions (such as travelling, self-similar and steady) are constructed. Unsteady simulations show that some special solutions are realized as asymptotic long time states of dynamic trajectories.
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    To properly describe heating in weakly collisional turbulent plasmas such as the solar wind, inter-particle collisions should be taken into account. Collisions can convert ordered energy into heat by means of irreversible relaxation towards the thermal equilibrium. Recently, Pezzi et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett., vol. 116, 2016, p. 145001) showed that the plasma collisionality is enhanced by the presence of fine structures in velocity space. Here, the analysis is extended by directly comparing the effects of the fully nonlinear Landau operator and a linearized Landau operator. By focusing on the relaxation towards the equilibrium of an out of equilibrium distribution function in a homogeneous force-free plasma, here it is pointed out that it is significant to retain nonlinearities in the collisional operator to quantify the importance of collisional effects. Although the presence of several characteristic times associated with the dissipation of different phase space structures is recovered in both the cases of the nonlinear and the linearized operators, the influence of these times is different in the two cases. In the linearized operator case, the recovered characteristic times are systematically larger than in the fully nonlinear operator case, this suggesting that fine velocity structures are dissipated slower if nonlinearities are neglected in the collisional operator.
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    Methyl thionitrite CH3SNO is an important model of S-nitrosated cysteine aminoacid residue (CysNO), a ubiquitous biological S-nitrosothiol (RSNO) involved in numerous physiological processes. Here, we report accurate structure and properties of CH3SNO using accurate ab initio Feller-Peterson-Dixon (FPD) approach. The FPD scheme included CCSD(T)-F12/CBS extrapolated values, as well as corrections for the quadruple coupled cluster excitations, core-valence and scalar-relativistic effects. The FPD scheme for the energetic parameters also included harmonic zero-point vibrational energy (ZPE) corrected for anharmonicity. The S-N bond length in cis-CH3SNO is calculated as 1.814 Angs, and its dissociation energy as 32.4 kcal/mol in the gas phase. The trans-CH3SNO conformation is 1.2 kcal/mol less stable compared to cis-CH3SNO, with a sizeable cis-trans isomerization barrier of 12.7 kcal/mol. The paradox of the unusually long and weak S-N bond, and hindered rotation along the S-N bond, was rationalized via the detailed analysis of the underlying electronic structure of the -SNO group using Natural Resonance Theory (NRT). After the benchmarking of the density functional theory (DFT) methods against the FPD reference, we recommend MPW2PLYP and MPW2PLYPD double hybrid functionals for calculation of the geometric properties, vibrational frequencies and isomerization barriers of S-nitrosothiols, and PBE0 (PBE0-GD3) hybrid functional for the S-N BDEs. The abovementioned DFT methods are capable of capturing the change in electronic structure and properties of the -SNO fragment, when the CH3SNO molecule is exposed to the influence of physiologically feasible external electric field FZ.
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    We achieve efficient shaping of superscattering by radially anisotropic nanowires relying on resonant multipolar interferences. It is shown that the radial anisotropy of refractive index can be employed to resonantly overlap electric and magnetic multipoles of various orders, and as a result effective superscattering with different engineered angular patterns can be obtained. We further demonstrate that such superscattering shaping relying on unusual radial anisotropy parameters can be directly realised with isotropic multi-layered nanowires, which may shed new light to many fundamental researches and various applications related to scattering particles.
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    The paper discusses an advanced level information system to support educational, research and scientific activities of the Department "Electrophysical Facilities" (DEF) of the National Research Nuclear University "MEPhI" (NRNU MEPhI), which is used for training of specialists of the course "Physics of Charged Particle Beams and Accelerator Technology".
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    In this paper, by comparing the time scales associated with the velocity relaxation and correlation time of the random force due to dust charge fluctuations, memory effects in the velocity relaxation of an isolated dust particle exposed to the random force due to dust charge fluctuations are considered, and the velocity relaxation process of the dust particle is considered as a non-Markovian stochastic process. Considering memory effects in the velocity relaxation process of the dust particle yields a retarded friction force, which is introduced by a memory kernel in the fractional Langevin equation. The fluctuation-dissipation theorem for the dust grain is derived from this equation. The mean-square displacement and the velocity autocorrelation function of the dust particle are obtained, and their asymptotic behavior, the dust particle temperature due to charge fluctuations, and the diffusion coefficient are studied in the long-time limit. As an interesting feature, it is found that by considering memory effects in the velocity relaxation process of the dust particle, fluctuating force on the dust particle can cause an anomalous diffusion in a dusty plasma. In this case, the mean-square displacement of the dust grain increases slower than linearly with time, and the velocity autocorrelation function decays as a power-law instead of the exponential decay. Finally, in the Markov limit, these results are in good agreement with those obtained from previous works for Markov (memoryless) process of the velocity relaxation.
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    The effect of radiative heat-loss function and finite ion Larmor radius (FLR) corrections on the thermal instability of infinite homogeneous viscous plasma has been investigated incorporating the effects of thermal conductivity and finite electrical resistivity for the formation of a molecular cloud. The general dispersion relation is derived using the normal mode analysis method with the help of relevant linearized perturbation equations of the problem. Furthermore the wave propagation along and perpendicular to the direction of external magnetic field has been discussed. Stability of the medium is discussed by applying Routh Hurwitzs criterion and it is found that thermal instability criterion determines the stability of the medium. We find that the presence of radiative heat-loss function and thermal conductivity modify the fundamental criterion of thermal instability into radiatively driven thermal instability criterion. In longitudinal direction FLR corrections, viscosity, magnetic field and finite resistivity have no effect on thermal instability criterion. The presence of radiative heat-loss function and thermal conductivity modify the fundamental thermal instability criterion into radiatively driven thermal instability criterion. Also the FLR corrections modify the growth rate of the Alfven mode. For transverse wave propagation FLR corrections, radiative heat-loss function, magnetic field and thermal conductivity modify the thermal instability criterion. From the curves it is clear that heat-loss function, FLR corrections and viscosity have stabilizing effect, while finite resistivity has destabilizing effect on the thermal modes. Our results show that the FLR corrections and radiative heat-loss functions affect the evolution of interstellar molecular clouds and star formation.
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    Multiphoton processes in undulators with plane polarized magnetic field are considered. It is shown that the use of strong magnetic fields in the undulator, for beams with relatively low energy makes it possible to increase substantially the frequencies of the amplified electromagnetic waves without noticeably decreasing the gain. The absorption, emission probabilities and the gain are calculated.
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    We report the first axion dark matter search with toroidal geometry. In this pioneering search, we exclude the axion-photon coupling $g_{a\gamma\gamma}$ down to about $5\times10^{-8}$ GeV$^{-1}$ over the axion mass range from 24.7 to 29.1 $\mu$eV at the 90\% confidence level. Prospects for axion dark matter searches with larger scale toroidal geometry are also given.
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    Random sampling via a quantile function Q(u) is a popular technique, but two very common sources of numerical instability are often overlooked: (i) quantile functions tend to be ill-conditioned when u=>1 and (ii) feeding them uniformly spaced u can make them ill-conditioned as u=>0. These flaws undermine the tails of Q(u)'s distribution, and both flaws are present in the polar method for normal sampling (used by GNU's std::normal_distribution and numpy.random.normal). Furthermore, quantile instability causes the polar method to lose precision near the mode; hence, it is not just Monte Carlos which study low-probability events which are sensitive to these effects, but also those with a very large sample size. This paper presents a novel method to mitigate quantile instability with minimal cost -- feeding high entropy u into a "quantile flip-flop."
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    We propose and experimentally demonstrate the enhancement in the filtering quality (Q) factor of an integrated micro-ring resonator (MRR) by embedding it in an integrated Fabry-Perot (FP) cavity formed by cascaded Sagnac loop reflectors (SLRs). By utilizing coherent interference within the FP cavity to reshape the transmission spectrum of the MRR, both the Q factor and the extinction ratio (ER) can be significantly improved. The device is theoretically analyzed, and practically fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer. Experimental results show that up to 11-times improvement in Q factor, together with an 8-dB increase in ER, can be achieved via our proposed method. The impact of varying structural parameters on the device performance is also investigated and verified by the measured spectra of the fabricated devices with different structural parameters.
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    Exact solutions for laminar stratified flows of Newtonian/non-Newtonian shear-thinning fluids in horizontal and inclined channels are presented. An iterative algorithm is proposed to compute the laminar solution for the general case of a Carreau non-Newtonian fluid. The exact solution is used to study the effect of the rheology of the shear-thinning liquid on two-phase flow characteristics considering both gas/liquid and liquid/liquid systems. Concurrent and counter-current inclined systems are investigated, including the mapping of multiple solution boundaries. Aspects relevant to practical applications are discussed, such as the insitu hold-up, or lubrication effects achieved by adding a less viscous phase. A characteristic of this family of systems is that, even if the liquid has a complex rheology (Carreau fluid), the two-phase stratified flow can behave like the liquid is Newtonian for a wide range of operational conditions. The capability of the two-fluid model to yield satisfactory predictions in the presence of shear-thinning liquids is tested, and an algorithm is proposed to a priori predict if the Newtonian (zero shear rate viscosity) behaviour arises for a given operational conditions in order to avoid large errors in the predictions of flow characteristics when the power-law is considered for modelling the shear-thinning behaviour. Two-fluid model closures implied by the exact solution and the effect of a turbulent gas layer are also addressed.
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    We describe the first precision measurement of the electron's electric dipole moment (eEDM, $d_e$) using trapped molecular ions, demonstrating the application of spin interrogation times over 700 ms to achieve high sensitivity and stringent rejection of systematic errors. Through electron spin resonance spectroscopy on $^{180}{\rm Hf}^{19}{\rm F}^{+}$ in its metastable $^{3}\Delta_{1}$ electronic state, we obtain $d_e = (0.9 \pm 7.7_{\rm stat} \pm 1.7_{\rm syst}) \times 10^{-29}\,e\,{\rm cm}$, resulting in an upper bound of $|d_e| < 1.3 \times 10^{-28}\,e\,{\rm cm}$ (90% confidence). Our result provides independent confirmation of the current upper bound of $|d_e| < 9.3 \times 10^{-29}\,e\,{\rm cm}$ [J. Baron $\textit{et al.}$, Science $\textbf{343}$, 269 (2014)], and offers the potential to improve on this limit in the near future.
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Recent comments

Stefano Pirandola Nov 30 2016 06:45 UTC

Dear Mark, thx for your comment. There are indeed missing citations to previous works by Rafal, Janek and Lorenzo that we forgot to add. Regarding your paper, I did not read it in detail but I have two main comments:

1- What you are using is completely equivalent to the tool of "quantum simulatio

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Mark M. Wilde Nov 30 2016 02:18 UTC

An update http://arxiv.org/abs/1609.02160v2 of this paper has appeared, one day after the arXiv post http://arxiv.org/abs/1611.09165 . The paper http://arxiv.org/abs/1609.02160v2 now includes (without citation) some results for bosonic Gaussian channels found independently in http://arxiv.org/abs/16

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wiadealo Nov 07 2016 09:27 UTC

Is it [fantasy][1] or real?

[1]: http://buchderfarben.de

Mark M. Wilde Oct 06 2016 15:44 UTC

The following paper found a setting in which adaptive operations do not help in quantum channel discrimination:

https://arxiv.org/abs/1408.3373

It is published as

Communications in Mathematical Physics, vol. 344, no. 3, pages 797-829, June 2016

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2

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Ovidiu Racorean Oct 05 2016 10:31 UTC

Spinning black holes are capable to implement complex quantum information processes with qubits encoded in the X-ray photons emitted by the accretion disk.

climaiw Sep 12 2016 16:19 UTC

I would suggest planets where life can really make a difference.

Mohammad Bavarian Sep 08 2016 03:58 UTC

So beautifully written!

Māris Ozols Sep 07 2016 13:03 UTC

John also has an excellent series of 7 blog posts covering this material:
https://www.physicsforums.com/insights/struggles-continuum-part-1/

resodiat Aug 23 2016 13:00 UTC

That is really a long-term perspective.