More Physics (physics)

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    One of the most important problems in linear optics quantum computing is to find the origin of its computational complexity. We claim in this work that the majorization of photon distributions is a crucial factor that affects the complexity of linear optics. Our analysis concentrates on the boson sampling problem, an exemplary model of linear optics. Prior to the main discussion, a majorization-dependent quantity that can measure the quantum complexity of identical particle distributions is introduced, which we call the Boltzmann entropy of elementary quantum complexity $S_B^q$. It decreases as the majorization of the photon distribution vector increases. Using the properties of majorization and $S_B^q$, we analyze two quantities that are the criteria for the computational complexity, $\mathcal{T}$ (the runtime of a generalized classical algorithm for calculating the permanent) and $\mathcal{E}$ (the additive error bound for an approximated permanent estimator). The runtime $\mathcal{T}$ becomes shorter as the input and output distribution vectors are more majorized, and the error bound $\mathcal{E}$ decreases as the majorization difference of input and output states increases. In addition, $S_B^q$ turns out to be an underlying quantity of $\mathcal{T}$ and $\mathcal{E}$, which implies that $S_B^q$ is an essential resource of the computational complexity of linear optics. We expect our findings would provide a fresh perspective to answer the fundamental questions of quantum supremacy.
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    Speech on the occasion of accepting the Dagmar and Vaclav Havel Foundation VIZE 97 Prize for 2017. Delivered at Prague Crossroads, October 5, 2017
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    Experiments may not reveal their full import at the time that they are performed. The scientists who perform them usually are testing a specific hypothesis and quite often have specific expectations limiting the possible inferences that can be drawn from the experiment. Nonetheless, as Hacking has said, experiments have lives of their own. Those lives do not end with the initial report of the results and consequences of the experiment. Going back and rethinking the consequences of the experiment in a new context, theoretical or empirical, has great merit as a strategy for investigation and for scientific problem analysis. I apply this analysis to the interplay between Fizeau's classic optical experiments and the building of special relativity. Einstein's understanding of the problems facing classical electrodynamics and optics, in part, was informed by Fizeau's 1851 experiments. However, between 1851 and 1905, Fizeau's experiments were duplicated and reinterpreted by a succession of scientists, including Hertz, Lorentz, and Michelson. Einstein's analysis of the consequences of the experiments is tied closely to this theoretical and experimental tradition. However, Einstein's own inferences from the experiments differ greatly from the inferences drawn by others in that tradition.
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    Information about an unknown quantum state can be encoded in weak values of projectors belonging to a complete eigenbasis. We present a protocol that enables one party -- Bob -- to remotely determine the weak values corresponding to weak measurements performed by another spatially separated party -- Alice. The particular set of weak values contains complete information of the quantum state encoded on Alice's ancilla, which enacts the role of the preselected system state in the aforementioned weak measurement. Consequently, Bob can determine the quantum state from these weak values, which can also be termed as remote state determination or remote state tomography. A combination of non-product bipartite resource state shared between the two parties and classical communication between them is necessary to bring this statistical scheme to fruition. Significantly, the information transfer of a pure quantum state of any known dimensions can be effected even with a resource state of low dimensionality and purity with a single measurement setting at Bob's end.
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    Non-classical quantum technologies that rely on manipulation of quantum states and exploitation of quantum superposition and entanglement are approaching a level of maturity sufficient to contemplate commercialization as the basis of practical devices for sensing, communications, navigation and other applications in the relatively near-term. However, realization of such technologies is dependent upon the development of appropriate Quantum Systems Engineering (QSE) approaches. It is clear that whilst traditional systems engineering will support much of the integration need, there are aspects associated with system of interest definition, system modelling, and system verification where substantial advances in the systems engineering approach are required. This paper lays out in detail the challenges associated with Quantum Enabled Systems and Technologies (QEST) and analyses the adequacy of systems engineering processes and tools, as defined by the Systems and Software Engineering lifecycle standard (ISO/IEC/IEEE 15288), to meet these challenges. The conclusions of this paper provide an outline agenda for systems research in order to engineer QEST.
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    Musical rhythms performed by humans typically show temporal fluctuations. While they have been characterized in simple rhythmic tasks, it is an open question what is the nature of temporal fluctuations, when several musicians perform music jointly in all its natural complexity. To study such fluctuations in over 100 original jazz and rock/pop recordings played with and without metronome we developed a semi-automated workflow allowing the extraction of cymbal beat onsets with millisecond precision. Analyzing the inter-beat interval (IBI) time series revealed evidence for two long-range correlated processes characterized by power laws in the IBI power spectral densities. One process dominates on short timescales ($t < 8$ beats) and reflects microtiming variability in the generation of single beats. The other dominates on longer timescales and reflects slow tempo variations. Whereas the latter did not show differences between musical genres (jazz vs. rock/pop), the process on short timescales showed higher variability for jazz recordings, indicating that jazz makes stronger use of microtiming fluctuations within a measure than rock/pop. Our results elucidate principles of rhythmic performance and can inspire algorithms for artificial music generation. By studying microtiming fluctuations in original music recordings, we bridge the gap between minimalistic tapping paradigms and expressive rhythmic performances.
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    The dismantling network problem only asks the minimal vertex set of a graph after removing which the remaining graph will break into connected components of sub-extensive size, but we should also consider the efficiency of intermediate states during the entire dismantling process, which is measured by the general performance R in this paper. In order to improve the general performance of the belief-propagation decimation (BPD) algorithm, we introduce a compound algorithm (CA) mixing the BPD and the node explosive percolation (NEP) algorithm. In this CA, the NEP algorithm will rearrange and optimize the head part of a dismantling sequence given by the BPD. Two ancestor algorithms are connected at the joint point where the general performance can be optimized. It dismantles a graph to small pieces as quickly as the BPD, and it is with the efficiency of the NEP during the entire dismantling process. We find that a wise joint point is where the BPD breaks the original graph to subgraphs no longer larger than the 1% of the original one. We refer the CA with this settled joint point as the fast CA and the fast CA is in the same complexity class with the BPD algorithm. The computation on some real-world instances also exhibits that using the fast CA to optimize the intermediate process of a dismantling algorithm is an effective approach.
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    The Latin American Giant Observatory (LAGO) is an extended astroparticle observatory with the goal of studying Gamma Ray Bursts (among other extreme universe phenomena), space weather and atmospheric radiation at ground level. It consists of a network of several Water Cherenkov Detectors (WCD) located at different sites and different latitudes along the American Continent (from Mexico up to the Antarctic region). Another interest of LAGO is to encourage and support the development of experimental basic research in Latin America, mainly with low cost equipment. In the case of Chiapas, Mexico, the experimental astroparticle physics activity was limited, up to now, to data analysis from other detectors located far away from the region. Thanks to the collaboration within LAGO, the deployment of one WCD is ongoing at the Universidad Autónoma de Chiapas (UNACH). This will allow, for the first time in the region, to train students and researchers in the deployment processes. Till now the setup of the signal-processing electronics has been performed and the characterization of the photomultiplier tube is currently being done. The main, short-term goal is to install one WCD on top of the Tacaná volcano in Chiapas in a short term. The status of the work is presented.
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    We study in the inviscid limit the global energy dissipation of Leray solutions of incompressible Navier-Stokes on the torus ${\mathbb T}^d$, assuming that the solutions have norms for Besov space $B^{\sigma,\infty}_3({\mathbb T}^d),$ $\sigma\in (0,1],$ that are bounded in the $L^3$-sense in time, uniformly in viscosity. We establish an upper bound on energy dissipation of the form $O(\nu^{(3\sigma-1)/(\sigma+1)}),$ vanishing as $\nu\to0$ if $\sigma>1/3.$ A consequence is that Onsager-type "quasi-singularities" are required in the Leray solutions, even if the total energy dissipation vanishes in the limit $\nu\to 0$, as long as it does so sufficiently slowly. We also give two sufficient conditions which guarantee the existence of limiting weak Euler solutions $u$ which satisfy a local energy balance with possible anomalous dissipation due to inertial-range energy cascade in the Leray solutions. For $\sigma\in (1/3,1)$ the anomalous dissipation vanishes and the weak Euler solutions may be spatially "rough" but conserve energy.
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    A signed network represents how a set of nodes are connected by two logically contradictory types of links: positive and negative links. Examples are signed product networks where two products can be complementary (purchased together) or substitutable (purchased instead of each other). Such contradictory types of links may play dramatically different roles in the spreading process of information, opinion etc. In this work, we propose a Self-Avoiding Pruning (SAP) random walk on a signed network to model e.g. a user's purchase activity on a signed network of products and information/opinion diffusion on a signed social network. Specifically, a SAP walk starts at a random node. At each step, the walker moves to a positive neighbour that is randomly selected and its previously visited node together with its negative neighbours are removed. We explored both analytically and numerically how signed network features such as link density and degree distribution influence the key performance of a SAP walk: the evolution of the pruned network resulting from the node removals of a SAP walk, the length of a SAP walk and the visiting probability of each node. Our findings in signed network models are further partially verified in two real-world signed networks.
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    Classical intermolecular potentials typically require an extensive parametrization procedure for any new compound considered. To do away with prior parametrization, we propose a combination of physics-based potentials with machine learning (ML), coined IPML, which is transferable across small neutral organic and biologically-relevant molecules. ML models provide on-the-fly predictions for environment-dependent local atomic properties: electrostatic multipole coefficients (significant error reduction compared to previously reported), the population and decay rate of valence atomic densities, and polarizabilities across conformations and chemical compositions of H, C, N, and O atoms. These parameters enable accurate calculations of intermolecular contributions---electrostatics, charge penetration, repulsion, induction/polarization, and many-body dispersion. Unlike other potentials, this model is transferable in its ability to handle new molecules and conformations without explicit prior parametrization: All local atomic properties are predicted from ML, leaving only eight global parameters---optimized once and for all across compounds. We validate IPML on various gas-phase dimers at and away from equilibrium separation, where we obtain mean absolute errors between 0.4 and 0.7 kcal/mol for several chemically and conformationally diverse datasets representative of non-covalent interactions in biologically-relevant molecules. We further focus on hydrogen-bond complexes---essential but challenging due to their directional nature---where datasets of DNA base pairs and amino acids yield an extremely encouraging 1.4 kcal/mol error. Finally, and as a first look, we consider IPML in more condensed-phase systems: water clusters, supramolecular host-guest complexes, and the benzene crystal.
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    We propose a targeted intervention protocol where recovery is restricted to individuals that have the least number of infected neighbours. Our recovery strategy is highly efficient on any kind of network, since epidemic outbreaks are minimal when compared to the baseline scenario of spontaneous recovery. In the case of spatially embedded networks, we find that an epidemic stays strongly spatially confined with a characteristic length scale undergoing a random walk. We demonstrate numerically and analytically that this dynamics leads to an epidemic spot with a flat surface structure and a radius that grows linearly with the spreading rate.
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    The conductivity of carbon nanotube (CNT) networks can be improved markedly by doping with nitric acid. In the present work, CNTs and junctions of CNTs functionalized with NO$_3$ molecules are investigated to understand the microscopic mechanism of nitric acid doping. According to our density functional theory band structure calculations, there is charge transfer from the CNT to adsorbed molecules indicating p-type doping. The average doping efficiency of the NO$_3$ molecules is higher if the NO$_3$ molecules form complexes with water molecules. In addition to electron transport along individual CNTs, we have also studied electron transport between different types (metallic, semiconducting) of CNTs. Reflecting the differences in the electronic structures of semiconducting and metallic CNTs, we have found that besides turning semiconducting CNTs metallic, doping further increases electron transport most efficiently along semiconducting CNTs as well as through a junction between them.
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    This paper presents a laser amplifier based on an antireflection coated laser diode. This laser amplifier operates without active temperature stabilisation at any wavelength within its gain profile without restrictions on the injection current. Using a active feedback from an external detector to the laser current the power stabilized to better than $10^{-4}$, even after additional optical elements such as an optical fiber and/or a polarization cleaner. This power can also be modulated and tuned arbitrarily. In the absence of the seeding light, the laser amplifier does not lase, thus resulting in an extremely simple setup, which requires neither an external Fabry Perot cavity for monitoring the mode purity nor a temperature stabilization.
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    We show that the properties of the electron beam and bright X-rays produced by a laser wakefield accelerator can be predicted if the distance over which the laser self-focuses and compresses prior to self-injection is taken into account. A model based on oscillations of the beam inside a plasma bubble shows that performance is optimised when the plasma length is matched to the laser depletion length. With a 200~TW laser pulse this results in an X-ray beam with median photon energy of 20 keV, $> 10^{9}$ photons per shot and a peak brightness of $4 \times 10^{23}$ photons s$^{-1}$ mrad$^{-2}$ mm$^{-2}$ (0.1 % BW)$^{-1}$.
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    Machine-learning interatomic potential (MLIP) has been of growing interest as a useful method to describe the energetics of systems of interest. In the present study, we examine the accuracy of linearized pairwise MLIPs and angular-dependent MLIPs for 31 elemental metals. Using all of the optimal MLIPs for 31 elemental metals, we show the robustness of the linearized frameworks, the general trend of the predictive power of MLIPs and the limitation of pairwise MLIPs. As a result, we obtain accurate MLIPs for all 31 elements using the same linearized framework. This indicates that the use of numerous descriptors is the most important practical feature for constructing MLIPs with high accuracy. An accurate MLIP can be constructed using only pairwise descriptors for most non-transition metals, whereas it is very important to consider angular-dependent descriptors when expressing interatomic interactions of transition metals.
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    The application of machine learning techniques to the reconstruction of lepton energy in water Cherenkov detectors is discussed and illustrated for TITUS, a proposed intermediate detector for the Hyper-Kamiokande experiment. It is found that applying these techniques leads to an improvement of more than 50 % in the energy resolution for all lepton energies compared to an approach based upon lookup tables.
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    Dynamics of platicons caused by the third-order dispersion is studied. It is shown that under the influence of the third-order dispersion platicons obtain angular velocity depending both on dispersion and on detuning value. A method of tuning of platicon associated optical frequency comb repetition rate is proposed.
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    Action potentials are the basic unit of information in the nervous system and their reliable detection and decoding holds the key to understanding how the brain generates complex thought and behavior. Transducing these signals into microwave field oscillations can enable wireless sensors that report on brain activity through magnetic induction. In the present work we demonstrate that action potentials from crayfish lateral giant neuron can trigger microwave oscillations in spin-torque nano-oscillators. These nanoscale devices take as input small currents and convert them to microwave current oscillations that can wirelessly broadcast neuronal activity, opening up the possibility for compact neuro-sensors. We show that action potentials activate microwave oscillations in spin-torque nano-oscillators with an amplitude that follows the action potential signal, demonstrating that the device has both the sensitivity and temporal resolution to respond to action potentials from a single neuron. The activation of magnetic oscillations by action potentials, together with the small footprint and the high frequency tunability, makes these devices promising candidates for high resolution sensing of bioelectric signals from neural tissues. These device attributes may be useful for design of high-throughput bi-directional brain-machine interfaces.
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    While long-range propagating plasmons have been extensively investigated for implementing on-chip optical sensing platforms, waveguide-excited localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) based sensing systems have not yet received much attention. Waveguide excitation and readout as an alternative to free-space light based single-particle spectroscopy are particularly attractive for high-throughput sensing and on-chip drug discovery platforms. Here we present a numerical investigation of the optical response of a waveguide-excited plasmonic dolmen-shaped compound nanoantenna that exhibits a Fano signature in its spectral response. Although only evanescently coupled to the waveguide, the compound nanoantenna is seen to induce a high-contrast extinction in the transmission spectrum of the waveguide. The compound plasmonic nanoantenna configuration presented here is of interest in hybrid photonic-plasmonic sensing approaches with high-throughput capabilities.
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    The paper describes the Faraday room that shields the CUORE experiment against electromagnetic fields, from 50 Hz up to high frequency. Practical contraints led to choose panels made of light shielding materials. The seams between panels were optimized with simulations to minimize leakage. Measurements of shielding performance show attenuation of a factor 15 at 50 Hz, and a factor 1000 above 1 KHz up to about 100 MHz.
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    Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) has shown to be a powerful tool to study the nanostructures of porous materials. Positron Emissions Tomography (PET) are devices allowing imaging of metabolic processes e.g. in human bodies. A newly developed device, the J-PET (Jagiellonian PET), will allow PALS in addition to imaging, thus combining both analyses providing new methods for physics and medicine. In this contribution we present a computer program that is compatible with the J-PET software. We compare its performance with the standard program LT 9.0 by using PALS data from hexane measurements at different temperatures. Our program is based on an iterative procedure, and our fits prove that it performs as good as LT 9.0.
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    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the heavy-ion detector designed to study the strongly interacting state of matter realized in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A major upgrade of the experiment is planned during the 2019-2020 long shutdown. In order to cope with a data rate 100 times higher than during LHC Run 1 and with the continuous read-out of the Time Projection Chamber (TPC), it is necessary to upgrade the Online and Offline Computing to a new common system called O2 . The O2 read- out chain will use commodity x86 Linux servers equipped with custom PCIe FPGA-based read- out cards. This paper discusses the driver architecture for the cards that will be used in O2 : the PCIe v2 x8, Xilinx Virtex 6 based C-RORC (Common Readout Receiver Card) and the PCIe v3 x16, Intel Arria 10 based CRU (Common Readout Unit). Access to the PCIe cards is provided via three layers of software. Firstly, the low-level PCIe (PCI Express) layer responsible for the userspace interface for low-level operations such as memory mapping the PCIe BAR (Base Address Registers) and creating scatter-gather lists, which is provided by the PDA (Portable Driver Architecture) library developed by the Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS). Above that sits our userspace driver which implements synchronization, controls the read-out card -- e.g. resetting and configuring the card, providing it with bus addresses to transfer data to and checking for data arrival -- and presents a uniform, high-level C++ interface that abstracts over the differences between the C-RORC and CRU. This interface -- of which direct usage is principally intended for high-performance read-out processes -- allows users to configure and use the various aspects of the read-out cards, such as configuration, DMA transfers and commands to the front-end. [...]
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    A novel decision feedback detection strategy exploiting a causality property of the nonlinear Fourier transform is introduced. The novel strategy achieves a considerable performance improvement compared to previously adopted strategies in terms of Q-factor.
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    Within the framework of xenon-based double beta decay experiments, we propose the possibility to improve the background rejection of an electroluminescent TPC by reducing the diffusion of the drifting electrons while keeping nearly intact the energy resolution of a pure xenon EL TPC. Based on state-of-the-art microscopic simulations, a substantial addition of Helium, around 10 or 15 \%, may reduce drastically the transverse diffusion down to 3 mm/$\sqrt{\mathrm{m}}$ from the 10.5 mm/$\sqrt{\mathrm{m}}$ of pure xenon. The longitudinal diffusion remains around 4.5 mm/$\sqrt{\mathrm{m}}$. At the same time, studies of light production can easily be done showing that the energy resolution is practically unaffected by such change. In this paper also we address the technical caveats of using photomultipliers close to a helium atmosphere.
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    The Jagiellonian Positron Emission Tomograph (J-PET) project carried out in the Institute of Physics of the Jagiellonian University is focused on construction and tests of the first prototype of PET scanner for medical diagnostic which allows for the simultaneous 3D imaging of the whole human body using organic scintillators. The J-PET prototype consists of 192 scintillator strips forming three cylindrical layers which are optimized for the detection of photons from the electron-positron annihilation with high time- and high angular-resolutions. In this article we present time calibration and synchronization of the whole J-PET detection system by irradiating each single detection module with a 22Na source and a small detector providing common reference time for synchronization of all the modules.
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    We employ the Grand Canonical Adaptive Resolution Molecular Dynamics Technique (GC-AdResS) to test the spatial locality of the 1-ethyl 3-methyl imidazolium chloride liquid. In GC-AdResS atomistic details are kept only in an open sub-region of the system while the environment is treated at coarse-grained level, thus if spatial quantities calculated in such a sub-region agree with the equivalent quantities calculated in a full atomistic simulation then the atomistic degrees of freedom outside the sub-region play a negligible role. The size of the sub-region fixes the degree of spatial locality of a certain quantity. We show that even for sub-regions whose radius corresponds to the size of a few molecules, spatial properties are reasonably reproduced thus suggesting a higher degree of spatial locality, a hypothesis put forward also by other researchers and that seems to play an important role for the characterization of fundamental properties of a large class of ionic liquids.
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    Many progresses in the understanding of epidemic spreading models have been obtained thanks to numerous modeling efforts and analytical and numerical studies, considering host populations with very different structures and properties, including complex and temporal interaction networks. Moreover, a number of recent studies have started to go beyond the assumption of an absence of coupling between the spread of a disease and the structure of the contacts on which it unfolds. Models including awareness of the spread have been proposed, to mimic possible precautionary measures taken by individuals that decrease their risk of infection, but have mostly considered static networks. Here, we adapt such a framework to the more realistic case of temporal networks of interactions between individuals. We study the resulting model by analytical and numerical means on both simple models of temporal networks and empirical time-resolved contact data. Analytical results show that the epidemic threshold is not affected by the awareness but that the prevalence can be significantly decreased. Numerical studies highlight however the presence of very strong finite-size effects, in particular for the more realistic synthetic temporal networks, resulting in a significant shift of the effective epidemic threshold in the presence of risk awareness. For empirical contact networks, the awareness mechanism leads as well to a shift in the effective threshold and to a strong reduction of the epidemic prevalence.
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    We design and analyze photo-metamaterials with each meta-atom containing both photodiode and light-emitting diode. Illumination of the photodiode by the light-emitting diode gives rise to an additional optical feedback within each unit cell, which strongly affects resonant properties and nonlinear response of the meta-atom. In particular, we demonstrate that symmetry breaking occurs upon a certain threshold magnitude of the incident wave intensity resulting in an abrupt emergence of second-harmonic generation, which was not originally available, as well as in the reduced third-harmonic signal.
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    Bolometric experiments searching for rare events usually require an extremely low radioactive background in order to avoid that spurious signals may mimic those of interest and spoil the sensitivity of the apparatus. In such contexts, radioactive sources cannot be used to produced a known signal to calibrate the measured energy spectrum during the data taking. In this paper we present an alternative approach to stabilize the response of bolometers, based on an electronic device designed to provide an ultra-stable and very precise calibrating pulse. The instrument is characterized by the presence of multi-outputs, a completely programmable pulse width and amplitude, a dedicated daisy-chained optical trigger line and can be fully controlled and remotely monitored via CAN bus protocol. An energy resolution of the order of 10 ppm FWHM at 1 MeV and a thermal stability of the order of 0.1 ppm/C have been achieved. The device can also provide an adjustable power to compensate the low frequency thermal fluctuations that typically occur in cryogenic experiments.
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    We study numerically the localization properties of eigenstates in a one-dimensional disordered lattice characterized by a non-Hermitian disordered Hamiltonian, where both the disorder and the non-Hermiticity are inserted simultaneously in the on-site potential. We calculate the averaged participation number, Shannon entropy and structural entropy as a function of other parameters. We show that, in the presence of an imaginary random potential, all eigenstates are exponentially localized in the thermodynamic limit and strong anomalous Anderson localization occurs at the band center. In contrast to the usual localization anomalies where a weaker localization is observed, the localization of the eigenstates at the band center is strongly enhanced in the present non-Hermitian model. This phenomenon is associated with the occurrence of a large number of strongly-localized states with pure imaginary energy eigenvalues.
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    For light harvestors with a reaction center complex (LH1-RC complex) of three types, we propose an experiment to verify our analysis based upon antenna theories that automatically include the required structural information. Our analysis conforms to current understanding of light-harvesting antennae in that we can explain known properties of the complex. a functional role of the notch at the light harvestor, the functional role of the special pair, a reason for the use of dielectric chlorophylls instead of a conductor to make the light harvestor, a mechanism to prevent damage from excess sunlight, an advantage of the dimeric form, a reason that the cross section of the light harvestor must not be circular, a reason for the modular design of nature, a function of the non-heme iron at the reaction center, and a reason that the light harvestor must not be spherical. Based upon our analysis we provide a mechanism for dimerization and propose an experiment. We predict the dimeric form of light-harvesting complexes is favoured under intense sunlight. We further comment upon the classification of the dimeric or S-shape complexes.
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    Recent experiments demonstrate the importance of substrate curvature for actively forced fluid dynamics. Yet, the covariant formulation and analysis of continuum models for non-equilibrium flows on curved surfaces still poses theoretical challenges. Here, we introduce and study a generalized covariant Navier-Stokes model for fluid flows driven by active stresses in non-planar geometries. The analytical tractability of the theory is demonstrated through exact stationary solutions for the case of a spherical bubble geometry. Direct numerical simulations reveal a curvature-induced transition from a burst phase to an anomalous turbulent phase that differs distinctly from externally forced classical 2D Kolmogorov turbulence. This new type of active turbulence is characterized by the self-assembly of finite-size vortices into linked chains of anti-ferromagnetic order, which percolate through the entire fluid domain, forming an active dynamic network. The coherent motion of the vortex chain network provides an efficient mechanism for upward energy transfer from smaller to larger scales, presenting an alternative to the conventional energy cascade in classical 2D turbulence.
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    We present a new two-snapshot structured light illumination (SLI) reconstruction algorithm for fast image acquisition. The new algorithm, which only requires two mutually \pi phase-shifted raw structured images, is implemented on a custom-built temporal focusing fluorescence microscope (TFFM) to enhance its axial resolution via a digital micromirror device (DMD). First, the orientation of the modulated sinusoidal fringe patterns is automatically identified via spatial frequency vector detection. Subsequently, the modulated in-focal-plane images are obtained via rotation and subtraction. Lastly, a parallel amplitude demodulation method, derived based on Hilbert transform, is applied to complete the decoding processes. To demonstrate the new SLI algorithm, a TFFM is custom-constructed, where a DMD replaces the generic blazed grating in the system and simultaneously functions as a diffraction grating and a programmable binary mask, generating arbitrary fringe patterns. The experimental results show promising depth-discrimination capability with an axial resolution enhancement factor of 1.25, which matches well with the theoretical estimation, i.e, 1.27. Imaging experiments on pollen grain samples have been performed. The results indicate that the two-snapshot algorithm presents comparable contrast reconstruction and optical cross-sectioning capability with those adopting the conventional root-mean-square (RMS) reconstruction method. The two-snapshot method can be readily applied to any sinusoidally modulated illumination systems to realize high-speed 3D imaging as less frames are required for each in-focal-plane image restoration, i.e., the image acquisition speed is improved by 2.5 times for any two-photon systems.
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    Validation experiments of the two-dimensional inverse algorithm are performed in a pulsed Poiseuille flow exposing shear reversal phases. The method is applied to the three-segment electrodiffusion (ED) probe for which a specific nondimensionalization process is suggested, allowing to better link measurements from a real ED probe to the modeled one in the inverse problem. This approach provided a two-component wall shear rate in good agreement with the one obtained from laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) measurements, thus validating the ability of ED probes to deal with high-amplitude unsteady flows. The classic linear velocity approximation ($u=sy$) in the probe vicinity is also investigated in such a flow.
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    Conventional beam orientation optimization (BOO) algorithms for IMRT assume that the same set of beam angles is used for all treatment fractions. In this paper we present a BOO formulation based on group sparsity that simultaneously optimizes non-coplanar beam angles for all fractions, yielding a fraction-variant (FV) treatment plan. Beam angles are selected by solving a multi-fraction FMO problem involving 500-700 candidate beams per fraction, with an additional group sparsity term that encourages most candidate beams to be inactive. The optimization problem is solved using the Fast Iterative Shrinkage-Thresholding Algorithm. Our FV BOO algorithm is used to create non-coplanar, five-fraction treatment plans for prostate and lung cases, as well as a non-coplanar 30-fraction plan for a head and neck case. A homogeneous PTV dose coverage is maintained in all fractions. The treatment plans are compared with fraction-invariant plans that use a fixed set of beam angles for all fractions. The FV plans reduced mean and max OAR dose on average by 3.3% and 3.7% of the prescription dose, respectively. Notably, mean OAR dose was reduced by 14.3% of prescription dose (rectum), 11.6% (penile bulb), 10.7% (seminal vesicle), 5.5% (right femur), 3.5% (bladder), 4.0% (normal left lung), 15.5% (cochleas), and 5.2% (chiasm). Max OAR dose was reduced by 14.9% of prescription dose (right femur), 8.2% (penile bulb), 12.7% (prox. bronchus), 4.1% (normal left lung), 15.2% (cochleas), 10.1% (orbits), 9.1% (chiasm), 8.7% (brainstem), and 7.1% (parotids). Meanwhile, PTV homogeneity defined as D95/D5 improved from .95 to .98 (prostate case) and from .94 to .97 (lung case), and remained constant for the head and neck case. Moreover, the FV plans are dosimetrically similar to conventional plans that use twice as many beams per fraction. Thus, FV BOO offers the potential to reduce delivery time for non-coplanar IMRT.
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    We propose an operating principle to achieve broadband and highly tunable mode conversion and amplification exploiting inter-modal four wave mixing in a multimode fiber. A bandwidth of 30 nanometers is demonstrated by properly designing a simple step-index silica fiber.
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    This paper presents a new approach to study the effects of temperature on the poro- elastic and viscoelastic behavior of articular cartilage. Biphasic solid-fluid mixture theory is applied to study the poro-mechancial behavior of articular cartilage in a fully saturated state. The balance of linear momentum, mass, and energy are considered to describe deformation of the solid skeleton, pore fluid pressure, and temperature distribution in the mixture. The mechanical model assumes both linear elastic and viscoelastic isotropic materials, infinitesimal strain theory, and a time-dependent response. The influence of temperature on the mixture behavior is modeled through temperature dependent mass density and volumetric thermal strain. The fluid flow through the porous medium is described by the Darcy's law. The stress-strain relation for time-dependent viscoelastic deformation in the solid skeleton is described using the generalized Maxwell model. A verification example is presented to illustrate accuracy and efficiency of the developed finite element model. The influence of temperature is studied through examining the behavior of articular cartilage for confined and unconfined boundary conditions. Furthermore, articular cartilage under partial loading condition is modeled to investigate the deformation, pore fluid pressure, and temperature dissipation processes. The results suggest significant impacts of temperature on both poro- elastic and viscoelastic behavior of articular cartilage.
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    In this thesis we study the lateral electrostatic interaction between a pair of non-identical, moderately charged colloidal particles trapped at an electrolyte interface in the limit of short inter-particle separations. Using a simplified model system we solve the problem analytically within the framework of linearised Poisson-Boltzmann theory and classical density functional theory. In the first step, we calculate the electrostatic potential inside the system exactly as well as within the widely used superposition approximation. Then these results are used to calculate the surface and line interaction energy densities between the particles. Contrary to the case of identical particles, depending upon the parameters of the system, we obtain that both the surface and the line interaction can vary non-monotonically with varying separation between the particles and the superposition approximation fails to predict the correct qualitative behaviours in most cases. Additionally, the superposition approximation is unable to predict the energy contributions quantitatively even at large distances. We also provide expression for the constant (independent of the inter-particle separation) interaction parameters, i.e., the surface tension, the line tension and the interfacial tension. Our results are expected to be of use for modelling particle-interaction at fluid interfaces and, in particular, for emulsion stabilization using oppositely charged particles.
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    The unique properties of topological semimetals have strongly driven efforts to seek for new topological phases and related materials. Here, we identify a critical condition for the existence of linked nodal rings (LNRs) in symmorphic crystals, and propose that three types of LNRs, named as alpha-, beta- and gamma-type, can be obtained by stacking semiconducting layers. Several honeycomb structures are suggested to be topological LNR semimetals, including layered and "hidden" layered structures. Transitions between the three types of LNRs can be driven by external strains. Interesting surface states other than drumhead states are found in these topological materials.
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    The Axion Resonant InterAction Detection Experiment (ARIADNE) is a collaborative effort to search for the QCD axion using techniques based on nuclear magnetic resonance. In the experiment, axions or axion-like particles would mediate short-range spin-dependent interactions between a laser-polarized 3He gas and a rotating (unpolarized) tungsten source mass, acting as a tiny, fictitious "magnetic field". The experiment has the potential to probe deep within the theoretically interesting regime for the QCD axion in the mass range of 0.1-10 meV, independently of cosmological assumptions. The experiment relies on a stable rotary mechanism and superconducting magnetic shielding, required to screen the 3He sample from ordinary magnetic noise. Progress on testing the stability of the rotary mechanism is reported, and the design for the superconducting shielding is discussed.
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    We develop a theoretical framework that lay out the fundamental rules under which a periodic (Floquet) driving scheme can induce non-reciprocal transport. Our approach relies on the formulation of the Floquet problem in the extended Hilbert space, when a Floquet lattice with an extra (frequency) dimension naturally arises. The properties of this lattice (its on-site potential and the intersite couplings) are in one-to-one correspondence with the driving scheme of the initial problem. This correspondence enables us to design driving schemes that yield non-reciprocal transport.
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    Recent advances in the fabrication of nanostructures and nanoscale features in metasurfaces offer a new prospect for generating visible, light emission from low energy electrons. In this paper, we present the experimental observation of visible light emission from low-energy free electrons interacting with nanoscale periodic surfaces through the Smith-Purcell (SP) effect. SP radiation is emitted when electrons pass in close proximity over a periodic structure, inducing collective charge motion or dipole excitations near the surface, thereby giving rise to electromagnetic radiation. We demonstrate a controlled emission of SP light from nanoscale gold gratings with periodicity as small as 50 nm, enabling the observation of visible SP radiation by low energy electrons (1.5 to 6 keV), an order of magnitude lower than previously reported. We study the emission wavelength and intensity dependence on the grating pitch and electron energy, showing agreement between experiment and theory. Further reduction of structure periodicity should enable the production of SP-based devices that operate with even slower electrons that allow an even smaller footprint and facilitate the investigation of quantum effects for light generation in nanoscale devices. A tunable light source integrated in an electron microscope would enable the development of novel electron-optical correlated spectroscopic techniques, with additional applications ranging from biological imaging to solid-state lighting.
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    The selection of beam orientations, which is a key step in radiation treatment planning, is particularly challenging for non-coplanar radiotherapy systems due to the large number of candidate beams. In this paper, we report progress on the group sparsity approach to beam orientation optimization, wherein beam angles are selected by solving a large scale fluence map optimization problem with an additional group sparsity penalty term that encourages most candidate beams to be inactive. The optimization problem is solved using an accelerated proximal gradient method, the Fast Iterative Shrinkage-Thresholding Algorithm (FISTA). We derive a closed-form expression for a relevant proximal operator which enables the application of FISTA. The proposed algorithm is used to create non-coplanar treatment plans for four cases (including head and neck, lung, and prostate cases), and the resulting plans are compared with clinical plans. The dosimetric quality of the group sparsity treatment plans is superior to that of the clinical plans. Moreover, the runtime for the group sparsity approach is typically about 5 minutes. Problems of this size could not be handled using the previous group sparsity method for beam orientation optimization, which was slow to solve much smaller coplanar cases. This work demonstrates for the first time that the group sparsity approach, when combined with an accelerated proximal gradient method such as FISTA, works effectively for non-coplanar cases with 500-800 candidate beams.
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    Experiments handling Rydberg atoms near surfaces must necessarily deal with the high sensitivity of Rydberg atoms to (stray) electric fields that typically emanate from adsorbates on the surface. We demonstrate a method to modify and reduce the stray electric field by changing the adsorbates distribution. We use one of the Rydberg excitation lasers to locally affect the adsorbed dipole distribution. By adjusting the averaged exposure time we change the strength (with the minimal value less than $0.2\,\textrm{V/cm}$ at $78\,\mu\textrm{m}$ from the chip) and even the sign of the perpendicular field component. This technique is a useful tool for experiments handling Ryberg atoms near surfaces, including atom chips.

Recent comments

Maciej Malinowski Jul 26 2017 15:56 UTC

In what sense is the ground state for large detuning ordered and antiferromagnetic? I understand that there is symmetry breaking, but other than that, what is the fundamental difference between ground states for large negative and large positive detunings? It seems to be they both exhibit some order

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C. Jess Riedel Jul 04 2017 21:26 UTC

Even if we kickstart evolution with bacteria, the amount of time until we are capable of von Neumann probes is almost certainly too small for this to be relevant. See for instance [Armstrong & Sandberg](http://www.sciencedirect.com.proxy.lib.uwaterloo.ca/science/article/pii/S0094576513001148). It

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xecehim Jun 27 2017 15:03 UTC

It has been [published][1]

[1]: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10509-016-2911-0

Noon van der Silk May 23 2017 11:15 UTC

I think this thread has reached it's end.

I've locked further comments, and I hope that the quantum computing community can thoughtfully find an approach to language that is inclusive to all and recognises the diverse background of all researchers, current and future.

I direct your attention t

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Varun Narasimhachar May 23 2017 02:14 UTC

While I would never want to antagonize my peers or to allow myself to assume they were acting irrationally, I do share your concerns to an extent. I worry about the association of social justice and inclusivity with linguistic engineering, virtual lynching, censorship, etc. (the latter phenomena sta

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Aram Harrow May 23 2017 01:30 UTC

I think you are just complaining about issues that arise from living with other people in the same society. If you disagree with their values, well, then some of them might have a negative opinion about you. If you express yourself in an aggressive way, and use words like "lynch" to mean having pe

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Steve Flammia May 23 2017 01:04 UTC

I agree with Noon that the discussion is becoming largely off topic for SciRate, but that it might still be of interest to the community to discuss this. I invite people to post thoughtful and respectful comments over at [my earlier Quantum Pontiff post][1]. Further comments here on SciRate will be

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Noon van der Silk May 23 2017 00:59 UTC

I've moderated a few comments on this post because I believe it has gone past useful discussion, and I'll continue to remove comments that I believe don't add anything of substantial value.

Thanks.

Aram Harrow May 22 2017 23:13 UTC

The problem with your argument is that no one is forcing anyone to say anything, or banning anything.

If the terms really were offensive or exclusionary or had other bad side effects, then it's reasonable to discuss as a community whether to keep them, and possibly decide to stop using them. Ther

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stan May 22 2017 22:53 UTC

Fair enough. At the end of the day I think most of us are concerned with the strength of the result not the particular language used to describe it.