Nuclear Experiment (nucl-ex)

  • PDF
    Low-energy Compton scattering off the proton is used for determination of the proton polarizabilities. However, the present empirical determinations rely heavily on the theoretical description(s) of the experimental cross sections in terms of polarizabilities. The most recent determinations are based on either the fixed-$t$ dispersion relations (DR) or chiral perturbation theory in the single-baryon sector ($\chi$PT). The two approaches obtain rather different results for proton polarizabilities, most notably for $\beta_{M1}$ (magnetic dipole polarizability). We attempt to resolve this discrepancy by performing a partial-wave analysis of the world data on proton Compton scattering below threshold. We find a large sensitivity of the extraction to a few "outliers", leading us to conclude that the difference between DR and $\chi$PT extraction is a problem of the experimental database rather than of "model-dependence". We have specific suggestions for new experiments needed for an efficient improvement of the database. With the present database, the difference of proton scalar polarizabilities is constrained to a rather broad interval: $\alpha_{E1}-\beta_{M1} = (6.8\, \ldots \, 10.9)\times 10^{-4}$ fm$^3$, with their sum fixed much more precisely [to $14.0(2)$] by the Baldin sum rule.
  • PDF
    Weak neutral current interactions with charged leptons have offered unique opportunities to study novel aspects of hadronic structure and search for physics beyond the standard model. These studies in the medium energy community have been primarily through parity-violating processes with electron beams, but with the possibility of polarized positron beams, new and complementary observables can be considered in experiments analogous to their electron counterparts. Such studies include elastic proton, deep inelastic, and electron target scattering. Potential positron neutral current experiments along with their potential physics reach, requirements, and feasibility are presented.
  • PDF
    Fast digitisers and digital pulse processing have been widely used for spectral application and pulse shape discrimination (PSD) owing to their advantages in terms of compactness, higher trigger rates, offline analysis, etc. Meanwhile, the noise of readout electronics is usually trivial for organic, plastic, or liquid scintillator with PSD ability because of their poor intrinsic energy resolution. However, LaBr3(Ce) has been widely used for its excellent energy resolution and has been proven to have PSD ability for alpha/gamma particles. Therefore, designing a digital acquisition system for such scintillators as LaBr3(Ce) with both optimal energy resolution and promising PSD ability is worthwhile. Several experimental research studies about the choice of digitiser properties for liquid scintillators have already been conducted in terms of the sampling rate and vertical resolution. Quantitative analysis on the influence of waveform digitisers, that is, fast amplifier (optional), sampling rates, and vertical resolution, on both applications is still lacking. The present paper provides quantitative analysis of these factors and, hence, general rules about the optimal design of digitisers for both energy resolution and PSD application according to the noise analysis of time-variant gated charge integration.
  • PDF
    An increasing number of experimental data indicates the breaking of axial symmetry in many heavy nuclei already in the valley of stability: Multiple Coulomb excitation analysed in a rotation invariant way, gamma transition rates and energies in odd nuclei, mass predictions, the splitting of Giant Resonances (GR), the collective enhancement of nuclear level densities and Maxwellian averaged neutron capture cross sections. For the interpretation of these experimental observations the axial symmetry breaking shows up in nearly all heavy nuclei as predicted by Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) calculations [1] ; this indicates a nuclear Jahn-Teller effect. We show that nearly no parameters remain free to be adjusted by separate fitting to level density or giant resonance data, if advance information on nuclear deformations, radii etc. are taken from such calculations with the force parameters already fixed. The data analysis and interpretation have to include the quantum mechanical requirement of zero point oscillations and the distinction between static vs. dynamic symmetry breaking has to be regarded.