Adaptation and Self-Organizing Systems (nlin.AO)

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    Whereas the relationship between criticality of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) and dynamics of GRNs at a single cell level has been vigorously studied, the relationship between the criticality of GRNs and system properties at a higher level has remained unexplored. Here we aim at revealing a potential role of criticality of GRNs at a multicellular level which are hard to uncover through the single-cell-level studies, especially from an evolutionary viewpoint. Our model simulated the growth of a cell population from a single seed cell. All the cells were assumed to have identical GRNs. We induced genetic perturbations to the GRN of the seed cell by adding, deleting, or switching a regulatory link between a pair of genes. From numerical simulations, we found that the criticality of GRNs facilitated the formation of nontrivial morphologies when the GRNs were critical in the presence of the evolutionary perturbations. Moreover, the criticality of GRNs produced topologically homogenous cell clusters by adjusting the spatial arrangements of cells, which led to the formation of nontrivial morphogenetic patterns. Our findings corresponded to an epigenetic viewpoint that heterogeneous and complex features emerge from homogeneous and less complex components through the interactions among them. Thus, our results imply that highly structured tissues or organs in morphogenesis of multicellular organisms might stem from the criticality of GRNs.
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    We investigate transition to synchronization in Sakaguchi-Kuramoto (SK) model on complex networks analytically as well as numerically. Natural frequencies of a percentage ($f$) of higher degree nodes of the network are assumed to be correlated with their degrees and that of the remaining nodes are drawn from some standard distribution namely Lorenz distribution. The effects of variation of $f$ and phase frustration parameter $\alpha$ on transition to synchronization are investigated in detail. Self-consistent equations involving critical coupling strength ($\lambda_c$) and group angular velocity ($\Omega_c$) at the onset of synchronization have been derived analytically in the thermodynamic limit. For the detailed investigation we considered SK model on scale-free as well as Erdős-Rényi (ER) networks. Interestingly explosive synchronization (ES) has been observed in both the networks for different ranges of values of $\alpha$ and $f$. For scale-free networks, as the value of $f$ is set within $10\% \leq f \leq 70\%$, the range of the values of $\alpha$ for existence of the ES is greatly enhanced compared to the fully degree-frequency correlated case. On the other hand, for random networks, ES observed in a narrow window of $\alpha$ when the value of $f$ is taken within $30\% \leq f \leq 50\%$. In all the cases critical coupling strengths for transition to synchronization computed from the analytically derived self-consistent equations show a very good agreement with the numerical results.
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    Electrical coupling between neurons is broadly present across brain areas and is typically assumed to synchronize network activity. However, intrinsic properties of the coupled cells can complicate this simple picture. Many cell types with strong electrical coupling have been shown to exhibit resonant properties, and the subthreshold fluctuations arising from resonance are transmitted through electrical synapses in addition to action potentials. Using the theory of weakly coupled oscillators, we explore the effect of both subthreshold and spike-mediated coupling on synchrony in small networks of electrically coupled resonate-and-fire neurons, a hybrid neuron model with linear subthreshold dynamics and discrete post-spike reset. We calculate the phase response curve using an extension of the adjoint method that accounts for the discontinuity in the dynamics. We find that both spikes and resonant subthreshold fluctuations can jointly promote synchronization. The subthreshold contribution is strongest when the voltage exhibits a significant post-spike elevation in voltage, or plateau. Additionally, we show that the geometry of trajectories approaching the spiking threshold causes a "reset-induced shear" effect that can oppose synchrony in the presence of network asymmetry, despite having no effect on the phase-locking of symmetrically coupled pairs.
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    Explaining the origin of life requires us to explain how self-replication arises. To be specific, how can a self-replicating entity develop spontaneously from a chemical reaction system in which no reaction is self-replicating? Previously proposed mathematical models either supply an explicit framework for a minimal living system or only consider catalyzed reactions, and thus fail to provide a comprehensive theory. We set up a general model for chemical reaction systems that properly accounts for energetics, kinetics and the conservation law. We find that (1) some systems are collectively-catalytic where reactants are transformed into end products with the assistance of intermediates (as in the citric acid cycle), while some others are self-replicating where different parts replicate each other and the system self-replicates as a whole (as in the formose reaction); (2) many alternative chemical universes often contain one or more such systems; (3) it is possible to construct a self-replicating system where the entropy of some parts spontaneously decreases, in a manner similar to that discussed by Schrodinger; (4) complex self-replicating molecules can emerge spontaneously and relatively easily from simple chemical reaction systems through a sequence of transitions. Together these results start to explain the origins of prebiotic evolution.
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    In this article is shown that large systems endowing phase coexistence display self-oscillations in presence of linear feedback between the control and order parameters, where an Andronov-Hopf bifurcation takes over the phase transition. This is simply illustrated through the mean field Landau theory whose feedback dynamics turns out to be described by the Van der Pol equation and it is then validated for the fully connected Ising model following heat bath dynamics. Despite its simplicity, this theory accounts potentially for a rich range of phenomena: here it is applied to describe in a stylized way i) excess demand-price cycles due to strong herding in a simple agent-based market model; ii) congestion waves in queueing networks triggered by users feedback to delays in overloaded conditions; iii) metabolic network oscillations resulting from cell growth control in a bistable phenotypic landscape.
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    Synchronizing phase frustrated Kuramoto oscillators, a challenge that has found applications from neuronal networks to the power grid, is an eluding problem, as even small phase-lags cause the oscillators to avoid synchronization. Here we show, constructively, how to strategically select the optimal frequency set, capturing the natural frequencies of all oscillators, for a given network and phase-lags, that will ensure perfect synchronization. We find that high levels of synchronization are sustained in the vicinity of the optimal set, allowing for some level of deviation in the frequencies without significant degradation of synchronization. Demonstrating our results on first and second order phase-frustrated Kuramoto dynamics, we implement them on both model and real power grid networks, showing how to achieve synchronization in a phase frustrated environment.
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    Growing concern that most published results, including those widely agreed upon, may be false are rarely examined against rapidly expanding research production. Replications have only occurred on small scales due to prohibitive expense and limited professional incentive. We introduce a novel, high-throughput replication strategy aligning 51,292 published claims about drug-gene interactions with high-throughput experiments performed through the NIH LINCS L1000 program. We show (1) that unique claims replicate 19% more frequently than at random, while those widely agreed upon replicate 45% more frequently, manifesting collective correction mechanisms in science; but (2) centralized scientific communities perpetuate claims that are less likely to replicate even if widely agreed upon, demonstrating how centralized, overlapping collaborations weaken collective understanding. Decentralized research communities involve more independent teams and use more diverse methodologies, generating the most robust, replicable results. Our findings highlight the importance of science policies that foster decentralized collaboration to promote robust scientific advance.
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    In this work, a mathematical model of self-oscillatory dynamics of the metabolism in a cell is studied. The full phase-parametric characteristics of variations of the form of attractors depending on the dissipation of a kinetic membrane potential are calculated. The bifurcations and the scenarios of the transitions \guillemotleftorder-chaos\guillemotright, \guillemotleftchaos-order\guillemotright and \guillemotleftorder-order\guillemotright are found. We constructed the projections of the multidimensional phase portraits of attractors, Poincaré sections, and Poincaré maps. The process of self-organization of regular attractors through the formation torus was investigated. The total spectra of Lyapunov exponents and the divergences characterizing a structural stability of the determined attractors are calculated. The results obtained demonstrate the possibility of the application of classical tools of nonlinear dynamics to the study of the self-organization and the appearance of a chaos in the metabolic process in a cells.
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    This paper is a follow-up work about the artificial ecosystem model: number soup (Liu and Sumpter, J. Royal Soc. Interface, 2017). It elaborates more details about this model and points out future directions.