Adaptation and Self-Organizing Systems (nlin.AO)

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    We investigate transition to synchronization in Sakaguchi-Kuramoto (SK) model on complex networks analytically as well as numerically. Natural frequencies of a percentage ($f$) of higher degree nodes of the network are assumed to be correlated with their degrees and that of the remaining nodes are drawn from some standard distribution namely Lorenz distribution. The effects of variation of $f$ and phase frustration parameter $\alpha$ on transition to synchronization are investigated in detail. Self-consistent equations involving critical coupling strength ($\lambda_c$) and group angular velocity ($\Omega_c$) at the onset of synchronization have been derived analytically in the thermodynamic limit. For the detailed investigation we considered SK model on scale-free as well as Erdős-Rényi (ER) networks. Interestingly explosive synchronization (ES) has been observed in both the networks for different ranges of values of $\alpha$ and $f$. For scale-free networks, as the value of $f$ is set within $10\% \leq f \leq 70\%$, the range of the values of $\alpha$ for existence of the ES is greatly enhanced compared to the fully degree-frequency correlated case. On the other hand, for random networks, ES observed in a narrow window of $\alpha$ when the value of $f$ is taken within $30\% \leq f \leq 50\%$. In all the cases critical coupling strengths for transition to synchronization computed from the analytically derived self-consistent equations show a very good agreement with the numerical results.
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    Electrical coupling between neurons is broadly present across brain areas and is typically assumed to synchronize network activity. However, intrinsic properties of the coupled cells can complicate this simple picture. Many cell types with strong electrical coupling have been shown to exhibit resonant properties, and the subthreshold fluctuations arising from resonance are transmitted through electrical synapses in addition to action potentials. Using the theory of weakly coupled oscillators, we explore the effect of both subthreshold and spike-mediated coupling on synchrony in small networks of electrically coupled resonate-and-fire neurons, a hybrid neuron model with linear subthreshold dynamics and discrete post-spike reset. We calculate the phase response curve using an extension of the adjoint method that accounts for the discontinuity in the dynamics. We find that both spikes and resonant subthreshold fluctuations can jointly promote synchronization. The subthreshold contribution is strongest when the voltage exhibits a significant post-spike elevation in voltage, or plateau. Additionally, we show that the geometry of trajectories approaching the spiking threshold causes a "reset-induced shear" effect that can oppose synchrony in the presence of network asymmetry, despite having no effect on the phase-locking of symmetrically coupled pairs.
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    Explaining the origin of life requires us to explain how self-replication arises. To be specific, how can a self-replicating entity develop spontaneously from a chemical reaction system in which no reaction is self-replicating? Previously proposed mathematical models either supply an explicit framework for a minimal living system or only consider catalyzed reactions, and thus fail to provide a comprehensive theory. We set up a general model for chemical reaction systems that properly accounts for energetics, kinetics and the conservation law. We find that (1) some systems are collectively-catalytic where reactants are transformed into end products with the assistance of intermediates (as in the citric acid cycle), while some others are self-replicating where different parts replicate each other and the system self-replicates as a whole (as in the formose reaction); (2) many alternative chemical universes often contain one or more such systems; (3) it is possible to construct a self-replicating system where the entropy of some parts spontaneously decreases, in a manner similar to that discussed by Schrodinger; (4) complex self-replicating molecules can emerge spontaneously and relatively easily from simple chemical reaction systems through a sequence of transitions. Together these results start to explain the origins of prebiotic evolution.