Nonlinear Sciences (nlin)

  • PDF
    The principle goal of computational mechanics is to define pattern and structure so that the organization of complex systems can be detected and quantified. Computational mechanics developed from efforts in the 1970s and early 1980s to identify strange attractors as the mechanism driving weak fluid turbulence via the method of reconstructing attractor geometry from measurement time series and in the mid-1980s to estimate equations of motion directly from complex time series. In providing a mathematical and operational definition of structure it addressed weaknesses of these early approaches to discovering patterns in natural systems. Since then, computational mechanics has led to a range of results from theoretical physics and nonlinear mathematics to diverse applications---from closed-form analysis of Markov and non-Markov stochastic processes that are ergodic or nonergodic and their measures of information and intrinsic computation to complex materials and deterministic chaos and intelligence in Maxwellian demons to quantum compression of classical processes and the evolution of computation and language. This brief review clarifies several misunderstandings and addresses concerns recently raised regarding early works in the field (1980s). We show that misguided evaluations of the contributions of computational mechanics are groundless and stem from a lack of familiarity with its basic goals and from a failure to consider its historical context. For all practical purposes, its modern methods and results largely supersede the early works. This not only renders recent criticism moot and shows the solid ground on which computational mechanics stands but, most importantly, shows the significant progress achieved over three decades and points to the many intriguing and outstanding challenges in understanding the computational nature of complex dynamic systems.
  • PDF
    Synchronization, that occurs both for non-chaotic and chaotic systems, is a striking phenomenon with many practical implications in natural phenomena. However, even before synchronization, strong correlations occur in the collective dynamics of complex systems. To characterize their nature is essential for the understanding of phenomena in physical and social sciences. The emergence of strong correlations before synchronization is illustrated in a few piecewise linear models. They are shown to be associated to the behavior of ergodic parameters which may be exactly computed in some models. The models are also used as a testing ground to find general methods to characterize and parametrize the correlated nature of collective dynamics.
  • PDF
    Rogue waves named by oceanographers are ubiquitous in nature and appear in a variety of different contexts such as water waves, liquid Helium, nonlinear optics, microwave cavities, etc. In this letter, we propose a novel type of exact (2+1)-dimensional rogue waves which may be found in many physical fields described by integrable and nonintegrable models. This type of rogue waves are closely related to invisible lumps. Usually, a lump is an algebraically localized wave in space but visible at any time. Whence a lump induces a soliton, the lump will become invisible before or after a fixed time. If a bounded twin soliton is induced by a lump, the lump will become a rogue wave (or instanton) and can only be visible at an instant time. Because of the existence of the induced visible solitons, the rogue wave may be predictable in some senses. For instance, the height, the position and the arrival time of the rogue wave can be predictable. The idea is illustrated by the celebrate (2+1)-dimensional Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation in its extended form.
  • PDF
    We propose a modification of the standard inverse scattering transform for the focusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation (also other equations by natural generalization) formulated with nonzero boundary conditions at infinity. The purpose is to deal with arbitrary-order poles and potentially severe spectral singularities in a simple and unified way. As an application, we use the modified transform to place the Peregrine solution and related higher-order "rogue wave" solutions in an inverse-scattering context for the first time. This allows one to directly study properties of these solutions such as their dynamical or structural stability, or their asymptotic behavior in the limit of high order. The modified transform method also allows rogue waves to be generated on top of other structures by elementary Darboux transformations, rather than the generalized Darboux transformations in the literature or other related limit processes.
  • PDF
    We study the Schwartz class of initial-boundary value (IBV) problems for the integrable Fokas-Lenells equation on the half-line via the Deift-Zhou's nonlinear descent method analysis of the corresponding Riemann-Hilbert problem such that the asymptotics of the Schwartz class of IBV problems as t\to∞is presented.

Recent comments

Veaceslav Molodiuc Apr 19 2017 07:26 UTC

http://ibiblio.org/e-notes/Chaos/intermit.htm

Travis Scholten Oct 02 2015 03:25 UTC

Apologies for the delayed reply.

No worries with regards to the code - when it does get released, would you mind pinging me? You can find me on [GitHub](https://github.com/Travis-S).

Nicola Pancotti Sep 23 2015 07:58 UTC

Hi Travis

Yes, that code is related to the work we did and that is my repo. However it is quite outdated. I used that repo for sharing the code with my collaborators. Now we are working for providing a human friendly version, commented and possibly optimized. If you would like to have a working

...(continued)
Travis Scholten Sep 21 2015 17:08 UTC

Has anyone found some source code for the SGD referenced in this paper? I came across a [GitHub repository](https://github.com/nicaiola/thesisproject) from Nicola Pancotti (at least, I think that is his username, and the code seems to fit with the kind of work described in the paper!). I am not sure

...(continued)