Nonlinear Sciences (nlin)

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    Although the free-fall three-body problem have been investigated for more than one century, however, only four collisionless periodic orbits have been found. In this paper, we report 234 collisionless periodic orbits of the free-fall three-body system with some mass ratios, including three known collisionless periodic orbits. Thus, 231 collisionless free-fall periodic orbits among them are entirely new. In theory, we can gain periodic orbits of the free-fall three-body system in arbitrary ratio of mass. Besides, it is found that, for a given ratio of masses of two bodies, there exists a generalized Kepler's third law for the periodic three-body system. All of these would enrich our knowledge and deepen our understanding about the famous three-body problem as a whole.
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    We predict wide-band suppression of tunneling of spin-orbit-coupled atoms (or noninteracting Bose-Einstein condensate) in a double-well potential with periodically varying depths of the potential wells. The suppression of tunneling is possible for a single state and for superposition of two states, i.e. for a qbit. By varying spin-orbit coupling one can drastically increase the range of modulation frequencies in which an atom remains localized in one of the potential wells, the effect connected with crossing of energy levels. This range of frequencies is limited because temporal modulation may also excite resonant transitions between lower and upper states in different wells. The resonant transitions enhance tunneling and are accompanied by pseudo-spin switching. Since the frequencies of the resonant transitions are independent of potential modulation depth, in contrast to frequencies at which suppression of tunneling occurs, by varying this depth one can dynamically control both spatial localization and pseudo-spin of the final state.
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    Dark and grey soliton-like states are shown to emerge from numerically constructed superpositions of translationally-invariant eigenstates of the interacting Bose gas in a toroidal trap. The exact quantum many-body dynamics reveals a density depression with superdiffusive spreading that is absent in the mean-field treatment of solitons. A simple theory based on finite-size bound states of holes with quantum-mechanical center-of-mass motion quantitatively explains the time-evolution of the superposition states and predicts quantum effects that could be observed in ultra-cold gas experiments. The soliton phase step is shown to be a key ingredient of an accurate finite size approximation, which enables us to compare the theory with numerical simulations. The fundamental soliton width, an invariant property of the quantum dark soliton, is shown to deviate from the Gross-Pitaevskii predictions in the interacting regime and vanishes in the Tonks-Girardeau limit.
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    Several integrable semi-discretizations are known in the literature for the massive Thirring system in characteristic coordinates. We present for the first time an integrable semi-discretization of the massive Thirring system in laboratory coordinates. Our approach relies on the relation between the continuous massive Thirring system and the Ablowitz-Ladik lattice. The Backlund transformation for solutions to the Ablowitz-Ladik lattice and the time evolution of the massive Thirring system in laboratory coordinates are combined together in the derivation of the Lax system for the integrable semi-discretization of the massive Thirring system.
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    The synchronization behavior of networked chaotic oscillators with periodic coupling is investigated. It is observed in simulations that the network synchronizability could be significantly influenced by tuning the coupling frequency, even making the network alternated between the synchronous and non-synchronous states. By the method of master stability function, we conduct a detailed analysis on the influence of coupling frequency on network synchronizability, and find that the network synchronizability is maximized at some characteristic frequencies comparable to the intrinsic frequency of the local dynamics. Moremore, it is found that as the amplitude of the coupling increases, the characteristic frequencies are gradually decreased. By the technique of finite-time Lyapunov exponent, we investigate further the mechanism for the maximized synchronizability, and find that at the characteristic frequencies the power spectrum of the finite-time Lyapunov exponent is abruptly changed from the localized to broad distributions. When this feature is absent or not prominent, the network synchronizability is less influenced by the periodic coupling. Our study shows the efficiency of finite-time Lyapunov exponent in exploring the synchronization behavior of temporally coupled oscillators, and sheds lights on the interplay between the system dynamics and structure in the general temporal networks.
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    Power-law-shaped avalanche-size distributions are widely used to probe for critical behavior in many different systems, particularly in neural networks. The definition of avalanche is ambiguous. Usually, theoretical avalanches are defined as the activity between a stimulus and the relaxation to an inactive absorbing state. On the other hand, experimental neuronal avalanches are defined by the activity between consecutive silent states. We claim that the latter definition may be extended to some theoretical models to characterize their power-law avalanches and critical behavior. We study a system in which the separation of driving and relaxation time scales emerges from its structure. We apply both definitions of avalanche to our model. Both yield power-law-distributed avalanches that scale with system size in the critical point as expected. Nevertheless, we find restricted power-law-distributed avalanches outside of the critical region within the experimental procedure, which is not expected by the standard theoretical definition. We remark that these results are dependent on the model details.
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    We introduce a two-variable model to describe spatial polarization, radicalization, and conflict. Individuals in the model harbor a continuous belief variable as well as a discrete radicalization level expressing their tolerance to neighbors with different beliefs. A novel feature of our model is that it incorporates a bistable radicalization process to address memory-dependent social behavior. We demonstrate how bistable radicalization may explain contradicting observations regarding whether social segregation exacerbates or alleviates conflicts. We also extend our model by introducing a mechanism to include institutional influence, such as propaganda or education, and examine its effectiveness. In some parameter regimes, institutional influence may suppress the progression of radicalization and allow a population to achieve social conformity over time. In other cases, institutional intervention may exacerbate the spread of radicalization through a population of mixed beliefs. In such instances, our analysis implies that social segregation may be a viable option against sectarian conflict.
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    Delay-coordinate embedding is a powerful, time-tested mathematical framework for reconstructing the dynamics of a system from a series of scalar observations. Most of the associated theory and heuristics are overly stringent for real-world data, however, and real-time use is out of the question due to the expert human intuition needed to use these heuristics correctly. The approach outlined in this thesis represents a paradigm shift away from that traditional approach. I argue that perfect reconstructions are not only unnecessary for the purposes of delay-coordinate based forecasting, but that they can often be less effective than reduced-order versions of those same models. I demonstrate this using a range of low- and high-dimensional dynamical systems, showing that forecast models that employ imperfect reconstructions of the dynamics---i.e., models that are not necessarily true embeddings---can produce surprisingly accurate predictions of the future state of these systems. I develop a theoretical framework for understanding why this is so. This framework, which combines information theory and computational topology, also allows one to quantify the amount of predictive structure in a given time series, and even to choose which forecast method will be the most effective for those data.

Recent comments

Veaceslav Molodiuc Apr 19 2017 07:26 UTC

http://ibiblio.org/e-notes/Chaos/intermit.htm

Travis Scholten Oct 02 2015 03:25 UTC

Apologies for the delayed reply.

No worries with regards to the code - when it does get released, would you mind pinging me? You can find me on [GitHub](https://github.com/Travis-S).

Nicola Pancotti Sep 23 2015 07:58 UTC

Hi Travis

Yes, that code is related to the work we did and that is my repo. However it is quite outdated. I used that repo for sharing the code with my collaborators. Now we are working for providing a human friendly version, commented and possibly optimized. If you would like to have a working

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Travis Scholten Sep 21 2015 17:08 UTC

Has anyone found some source code for the SGD referenced in this paper? I came across a [GitHub repository](https://github.com/nicaiola/thesisproject) from Nicola Pancotti (at least, I think that is his username, and the code seems to fit with the kind of work described in the paper!). I am not sure

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