Statistics Theory (math.ST)

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    We consider the statistical inverse problem of recovering a function $f: M \to \mathbb R$, where $M$ is a smooth compact Riemannian manifold with boundary, from measurements of general $X$-ray transforms $I_a(f)$ of $f$, corrupted by additive Gaussian noise. For $M$ equal to the unit disk with `flat' geometry and $a=0$ this reduces to the standard Radon transform, but our general setting allows for anisotropic media $M$ and can further model local `attenuation' effects -- both highly relevant in practical imaging problems such as SPECT tomography. We propose a nonparametric Bayesian inference approach based on standard Gaussian process priors for $f$. The posterior reconstruction of $f$ corresponds to a Tikhonov regulariser with a reproducing kernel Hilbert space norm penalty that does not require the calculation of the singular value decomposition of the forward operator $I_a$. We prove Bernstein-von Mises theorems that entail that posterior-based inferences such as credible sets are valid and optimal from a frequentist point of view for a large family of semi-parametric aspects of $f$. In particular we derive the asymptotic distribution of smooth linear functionals of the Tikhonov regulariser, which is shown to attain the semi-parametric Cramér-Rao information bound. The proofs rely on an invertibility result for the `Fisher information' operator $I_a^*I_a$ between suitable function spaces, a result of independent interest that relies on techniques from microlocal analysis. We illustrate the performance of the proposed method via simulations in various settings.
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    Statistical inference can be computationally prohibitive in ultrahigh-dimensional linear models. Correlation-based variable screening, in which one leverages marginal correlations for removal of irrelevant variables from the model prior to statistical inference, can be used to overcome this challenge. Prior works on correlation-based variable screening either impose strong statistical priors on the linear model or assume specific post-screening inference methods. This paper first extends the analysis of correlation-based variable screening to arbitrary linear models and post-screening inference techniques. In particular, ($i$) it shows that a condition---termed the screening condition---is sufficient for successful correlation-based screening of linear models, and ($ii$) it provides insights into the dependence of marginal correlation-based screening on different problem parameters. Numerical experiments confirm that these insights are not mere artifacts of analysis; rather, they are reflective of the challenges associated with marginal correlation-based variable screening. Second, the paper explicitly derives the screening condition for two families of linear models, namely, sub-Gaussian linear models and arbitrary (random or deterministic) linear models. In the process, it establishes that---under appropriate conditions---it is possible to reduce the dimension of an ultrahigh-dimensional, arbitrary linear model to almost the sample size even when the number of active variables scales almost linearly with the sample size.
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    We show that under a low complexity condition on the gradient of a Hamiltonian, Gibbs distributions on the Boolean hypercube are approximate mixtures of product measures whose probability vectors are critical points of an associated mean-field functional. This extends a previous work by the first author. As an application, we demonstrate how this framework helps characterize both Ising models satisfying a mean-field condition and the conditional distributions which arise in the emerging theory of nonlinear large deviations.
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    We establish the convergence rates and asymptotic distributions of the common break change-point estimators, obtained by least squares and maximum likelihood in panel data models and compare their asymptotic variances. Our model assumptions accommodate a variety of commonly encountered probability distributions and, in particular, models of particular interest in econometrics beyond the commonly analyzed Gaussian model, including the zero-inflated Poisson model for count data, and the probit and tobit models. We also provide novel results for time dependent data in the signal-plus-noise model, with emphasis on a wide array of noise processes, including Gaussian process, MA$(\infty)$ and $m$-dependent processes. The obtained results show that maximum likelihood estimation requires a stronger signal-to-noise model identifiability condition compared to its least squares counterpart. Finally, since there are three different asymptotic regimes that depend on the behavior of the norm difference of the model parameters before and after the change point, which cannot be realistically assumed to be known, we develop a novel data driven adaptive procedure that provides valid confidence intervals for the common break, without requiring a priori knowledge of the asymptotic regime the problem falls in.

Recent comments

Alessandro Dec 09 2015 01:12 UTC

Hey, I've already seen this title! http://arxiv.org/abs/1307.0401

Richard Kueng Mar 08 2015 22:02 UTC

Neither, Frédéric! Replacing fidelity by superfidelity still requires optimizing over all density matrices. However, the Birkhoff-von Neumann Theorem (see Lemma 1) allows for further restricting this optimization to n scalar variables w.l.o.g.---Theorem 2. Arguably, this greatly simplifies the geome

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Frédéric Grosshans Mar 05 2015 11:31 UTC

I fell for that clickbait title and read the paper. I still don’t get why von Neumann didn't want us to know about this weird trick? And which weird trick? The use of superfidelity or the use of non-physical density matrices like $\sigma^\sharp$?

Noon van der Silk Mar 03 2015 03:20 UTC

I took the liberty of uploading the IPython notebook as a github [gist](https://gist.github.com), so it's viewable [here](http://nbviewer.ipython.org/urls/gist.githubusercontent.com/silky/b14fa42c6d5475a3a724/raw/887c19fb04581f1a33f9d03370e4b7b3a33c2ea8/ferrie_kueng_bayes_est_fid.ipynb).