Optimization and Control (math.OC)

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    We propose a family of nonconvex optimization algorithms that are able to save gradient and negative curvature computations to a large extent, and are guaranteed to find an approximate local minimum with improved runtime complexity. At the core of our algorithms is the division of the entire domain of the objective function into small and large gradient regions: our algorithms only perform gradient descent based procedure in the large gradient region, and only perform negative curvature descent in the small gradient region. Our novel analysis shows that the proposed algorithms can escape the small gradient region in only one negative curvature descent step whenever they enter it, and thus they only need to perform at most $N_{\epsilon}$ negative curvature direction computations, where $N_{\epsilon}$ is the number of times the algorithms enter small gradient regions. For both deterministic and stochastic settings, we show that the proposed algorithms can potentially beat the state-of-the-art local minima finding algorithms. For the finite-sum setting, our algorithm can also outperform the best algorithm in a certain regime.
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    We consider autonomous racing of two cars and present an approach to formulate the decision making as a non-cooperative non-zero-sum game. The game is formulated by restricting both players to fulfill static track constraints as well as collision constraints which depend on the combined actions of the two players. At the same time the players try to maximize their own progress. In the case where the action space of the players is finite, the racing game can be reformulated as a bimatrix game. For this bimatrix game, we show that the actions obtained by a sequential maximization approach where only the follower considers the action of the leader are identical to a Stackelberg and a Nash equilibrium in pure strategies. Furthermore, we propose a game promoting blocking, by additionally rewarding the leading car for staying ahead at the end of the horizon. We show that this changes the Stackelberg equilibrium, but has a minor influence on the Nash equilibria. For an online implementation, we propose to play the games in a moving horizon fashion, and we present two methods for guaranteeing feasibility of the resulting coupled repeated games. Finally, we study the performance of the proposed approaches in simulation for a set-up that replicates the miniature race car tested at the Automatic Control Laboratory of ETH Zurich. The simulation study shows that the presented games can successfully model different racing behaviors and generate interesting racing situations.
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    Proximal gradient methods have been found to be highly effective for solving minimization problems with non-negative constraints or L1-regularization. Under suitable nondegeneracy conditions, it is known that these algorithms identify the optimal sparsity pattern for these types of problems in a finite number of iterations. However, it is not known how many iterations this may take. We introduce the notion of the "active-set complexity", which in these cases is the number of iterations before an algorithm is guaranteed to have identified the final sparsity pattern. We further give a bound on the active-set complexity of proximal gradient methods in the common case of minimizing the sum of a strongly-convex smooth function and a separable convex non-smooth function.
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    We search saddle points for a large class of convex-concave Lagrangian. A generalized explicit iterative scheme based on Arrow-Hurwicz method converges to a saddle point of the problem. We also propose in this work, a convergent semi-implicit scheme in order to accelerate the convergence of the iterative process. Numerical experiments are provided for a nontrivial numerical problem modeling an optimal shape problem of thin torsion rods. This semi-implicit scheme is figured out in practice robustly efficient in comparison with the explicit one.
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    Predictive motion planning is the key to achieve energy-efficient driving, which is one of the main benefits of automated driving. Researchers have been studying the planning of velocity trajectories, a simpler form of motion planning, for over a decade now and many different methods are available. Dynamic programming has shown to be the most common choice due to its numerical background and ability to include nonlinear constraints and models. Although planning of optimal trajectory is done in a systematic way, dynamic programming doesn't use any knowledge about the considered problem to guide the exploration and therefore explores all possible trajectories. A* is an algorithm which enables using knowledge about the problem to guide the exploration to the most promising solutions first. Knowledge has to be represented in a form of a heuristic function, which gives an optimistic estimate of cost for transitioning between two states, which is not a straightforward task. This paper presents a novel heuristics incorporating air drag and auxiliary power as well as operational costs of the vehicle, besides kinetic and potential energy and rolling resistance known in the literature. Furthermore, optimal cruising velocity, which depends on vehicle aerodynamic properties and auxiliary power, is derived. Results are compared for different variants of heuristic functions and dynamic programming as well.
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    Several results concerning existence of solutions of a quasiequilibrium problem defined on a finite dimensional space are established. The proof of the first result is based on a Michael selection theorem for lower semicontinuous set-valued maps which holds in finite dimensional spaces. Furthermore this result allows one to locate the position of a solution. Sufficient conditions, which are easier to verify, may be obtained by imposing restrictions either on the domain or on the bifunction. These facts make it possible to yield various existence results which reduce to the well known Ky Fan minimax inequality when the constraint map is constant and the quasiequilibrium problem coincides with an equilibrium problem. Lastly, a comparison with other results from the literature is discussed.
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    The purpose of this work is to pose and solve the problem to guide a collection of weakly interacting dynamical systems (agents, particles, etc.) to a specified terminal distribution. The framework is that of mean-field and of cooperative games. A terminal cost is used to accomplish the task; we establish that the map between terminal costs and terminal probability distributions is onto. Our approach relies on and extends the theory of optimal mass transport and its generalizations.
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    This paper presents reduction theorems for stability, attractivity, and asymptotic stability of compact subsets of the state space of a hybrid dynamical system. Given two closed sets $\Gamma_1 \subset \Gamma_2 \subset \Re^n$, with $\Gamma_1$ compact, the theorems presented in this paper give conditions under which a qualitative property of $\Gamma_1$ that holds relative to $\Gamma_2$ (stability, attractivity, or asymptotic stability) can be guaranteed to also hold relative to the state space of the hybrid system. As a consequence of these results, sufficient conditions are presented for the stability of compact sets in cascade-connected hybrid systems. We also present a result for hybrid systems with outputs that converge to zero along solutions. If such a system enjoys a detectability property with respect to a set $\Gamma_1$, then $\Gamma_1$ is globally attractive. The theory of this paper is used to develop a hybrid estimator for the period of oscillation of a sinusoidal signal.
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    This paper addresses the compliance minimization of a truss, where the number of available nodes is limited. It is shown that this optimization problem can be recast as a second-order cone programming with a cardinality constraint. We propose a simple heuristic based on the alternative direction method of multipliers. The efficiency of the proposed method is compared with a global optimization approach based on mixed-integer second-order cone programming. Numerical experiments demonstrate that the proposed method often finds a solution having a good objective value with small computational cost.
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    Numerous problems in signal processing and imaging, statistical learning and data mining, or computer vision can be formulated as optimization problems which consist in minimizing a sum of convex functions, not necessarily differentiable, possibly composed with linear operators and that in turn can be transformed to split feasibility problems (SFP), see for example \citece94. Each function is typically either a data fidelity term or a regularization term enforcing some properties on the solution, see for example \citecpp09 and references therein. In this paper we are interested in Split Feasibility Problems which can be seen as a general form of $Q$-Lasso introduced in \citeaasnx13 that extended the well-known Lasso of Tibshirani \citeTibshirani96. $Q$ is a closed convex subset of a Euclidean $m$-space, for some integer $m\geq1$, that can be interpreted as the set of errors within given tolerance level when linear measurements are taken to recover a signal/image via the Lasso. Inspired by recent works by Lou et al \citely, xcxz12, we are interested in a nonconvex regularization of SFP and propose three split algorithms for solving this general case. The first one is based on the DC (difference of convex) algorithm (DCA) introduced by Pham Dinh Tao, the second one in nothing else than the celebrate forward-backward algorithm and the third one uses a method introduced by Mine and Fukushima. It is worth mentioning that the SFP model a number of applied problems arising from signal/image processing and specially optimization problems for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning, see for example \citecbmt06.
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    We consider a constrained hierarchical opinion dynamics in the case of leaders' competition and with complete information among leaders. Each leaders' group tries to drive the followers' opinion towards a desired state accordingly to a specific strategy. By using the Boltzmann-type control approach we analyze the best-reply strategy for each leaders' population. Derivation of the corresponding Fokker-Planck model permits to investigate the asymptotic behaviour of the solution. Heterogeneous followers populations are then considered where the effect of knowledge impacts the leaders' credibility and modifies the outcome of the leaders' competition.

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Bin Shi Oct 05 2017 00:07 UTC

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