Optimization and Control (math.OC)

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    The aim of this work is to study, from an intrinsic and geometric point of view, second-order constrained variational problems on Lie algebroids, that is, optimization problems defined by a cost functional which depends on higher-order derivatives of admissible curves on a Lie algebroid. Extending the classical Skinner and Rusk formalism for the mechanics in the context of Lie algebroids, for second-order constrained mechanical systems, we derive the corresponding dynamical equations. We find a symplectic Lie subalgebroid where, under some mild regularity conditions, the second-order constrained variational problem, seen as a presymplectic Hamiltonian system, has a unique solution. We study the relationship of this formalism with the second-order constrained Euler-Poincaré and Lagrange-Poincaré equations, among others. Our study is applied to the optimal control of mechanical systems.
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    Optimal control problems of nonholonomically constrained mechanical systems can be understood as constrained second order variational problems. A geometric interpretation of this relationship relies on constrained variational calculus for mechanics defined on a skew-symmetric algebroid. This brief communication attempts to study how this geometric structure allows us to describe in a simplified way the dynamics of the optimal control for nonholonomic mechanical systems as solutions of constrained second order variational problems, and, under some mild regularity conditions, how the dynamics of the optimal control problem is determined by a Hamiltonian system on the cotangent bundle of a skew-symmetric algebroid.
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    The backpressure algorithm has been widely used as a distributed solution to the problem of joint rate control and routing in multi-hop data networks. By controlling a parameter $V$ in the algorithm, the backpressure algorithm can achieve an arbitrarily small utility optimality gap. However, this in turn brings in a large queue length at each node and hence causes large network delay. This phenomenon is known as the fundamental utility-delay tradeoff. The best known utility-delay tradeoff for general networks is $[O(1/V), O(V)]$ and is attained by a backpressure algorithm based on a drift-plus-penalty technique. This may suggest that to achieve an arbitrarily small utility optimality gap, the existing backpressure algorithms necessarily yield an arbitrarily large queue length. However, this paper proposes a new backpressure algorithm that has a vanishing utility optimality gap, so utility converges to exact optimality as the algorithm keeps running, while queue lengths are bounded throughout by a finite constant. The technique uses backpressure and drift concepts with a new method for convex programming.
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    A bilevel hierarchical clustering model is commonly used in designing optimal multicast networks. In this paper we will consider two different formulations of the bilevel hierarchical clustering problem -- a discrete optimization problem which can be shown to be NP-hard. Our approach is to reformulate the problem as a continuous optimization problem by making some relaxations on the discreteness conditions. This approach was considered by other researchers earlier, but their proposed methods depend on the square of the Euclidian norm because of its differentiability. By applying the Nesterov smoothing technique and the DCA -- a numerical algorithm for minimizing differences of convex functions -- we are able to cope with new formulations that involve the Euclidean norm instead of the squared Euclidean norm. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate our method.
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    We consider the theoretical properties of a model which encompasses bi-partite matching under transferable utility on the one hand, and hedonic pricing on the other. This framework is intimately connected to tripartite matching problems (known as multi-marginal optimal transport problems in the mathematical literature). We exploit this relationship in two ways; first, we show that a known structural result from multi-marginal optimal transport can be used to establish an upper bound on the dimension of the support of stable matchings. Next, assuming the distribution of agents on one side of the market is continuous, we identify a condition on their preferences that ensures purity and uniqueness of the stable matching; this condition is a variant of a known condition in the mathematical literature, which guarantees analogous properties in the multi-marginal optimal transport problem. We exhibit several examples of surplus functions for which our condition is satisfied, as well as some for which it fails.
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    There are tradeoffs between current sharing among distributed resources and DC bus voltage stability when conventional droop control is used in DC microgrids. As current sharing approaches the setpoint, bus voltage deviation increases. Previous studies have suggested using secondary control utilizing linear controllers to overcome drawbacks of droop control. However, linear control design depends on an accurate model of the system. The derivation of such a model is challenging because the noise and disturbances caused by the coupling between sources, loads, and switches in microgrids are under-represented. This under-representation makes linear modeling and control insufficient. Hence, in this paper, we propose a robust adaptive control to adjust droop characteristics to satisfy both current sharing and bus voltage stability. First, the time-varying models of DC microgrids are derived. Second, the improvements for the adaptive control method are presented. Third, the application of the enhanced adaptive method to DC microgrids is presented to satisfy the system objective. Fourth, simulation and experimental results on a microgrid show that the adaptive method precisely shares current between two distributed resources and maintains the nominal bus voltage. Last, the comparative study validates the effectiveness of the proposed method over the conventional method.
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    This book addresses the scientific domains of operations research, information science and statistics with a focus on engineering applications. The purpose of this book is to report on the implications of the loop equations formulation of the state estimation procedure of the network systems, for the purpose of the implementation of Decision Support (DS) systems for the operational control of the network systems. In general an operational DS comprises a series of standalone applications from which the mathematical modeling and simulation of the distribution systems and the managing of the uncertainty in the decision-making process are essential in order to obtain efficient control and monitoring of the distribution systems. The mathematical modeling and simulation forms the basis for detailed optimization of the network operations and the second one uses uncertainty based reasoning in order to reduce the complexity of the network system and to increase the credibility of its model. This book reports on the integration of the two aspects of operational DS into a single computational framework of loop network equations. The proposed DS system will be validated using case studies taken from the water industry. The optimal control of water distribution systems is an important problem because the models are non-linear and large-scale and measurements are prone to errors and very often they are incomplete.
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    We consider multi-sensor fusion estimation for clustered sensor networks. Both sequential measurement fusion and state fusion estimation methods are presented. It is shown that the proposed sequential fusion estimation methods achieve the same performance as the batch fusion one, but are more convenient to deal with asynchronous or delayed data since they are able to handle the data that is available sequentially. Moreover, the sequential measurement fusion method has lower computational complexity than the conventional sequential Kalman estimation and the measurement augmentation methods, while the sequential state fusion method is shown to have lower computational complexity than the batch state fusion one. Simulations of a target tracking system are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed results.
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    Bound-to-Bound Data Collaboration (B2BDC) provides a natural framework for addressing both forward and inverse uncertainty quantification problems. In this approach, QOI (quantity of interest) models are constrained by related experimental observations with interval uncertainty. A collection of such models and observations is termed a dataset and carves out a feasible region in the parameter space. If a dataset has a nonempty feasible set, it is said to be consistent. In real-world applications, it is often the case that collections of experiments and observations are inconsistent. Revealing the source of this inconsistency, i.e., identifying which models and/or observations are problematic, is essential before a dataset can be used for prediction. To address this issue, we introduce a constraint relaxation-based approach, entitled the vector consistency measure, for investigating datasets with numerous sources of inconsistency. The benefits of this vector consistency measure over a previous method of consistency analysis are demonstrated in two realistic gas combustion examples.