Numerical Analysis (math.NA)

  • PDF
    In standard models of cardiac electrophysiology, including the bidomain and monodomain models, local perturbations can propagate at infinite speed. We address this unrealistic property by developing a hyperbolic bidomain model that is based on a generalization of Ohm's law with a Cattaneo-type model for the fluxes. Further, we obtain a hyperbolic monodomain model in the case that the intracellular and extracellular conductivity tensors have the same anisotropy ratio. In one spatial dimension, the hyperbolic monodomain model is equivalent to a cable model that includes axial inductances, and the relaxation times of the Cattaneo fluxes are strictly related to these inductances. A purely linear analysis shows that the inductances are negligible, but models of cardiac electrophysiology are highly nonlinear, and linear predictions may not capture the fully nonlinear dynamics. In fact, contrary to the linear analysis, we show that for simple nonlinear ionic models, an increase in conduction velocity is obtained for small and moderate values of the relaxation time. A similar behavior is also demonstrated with biophysically detailed ionic models. Using the Fenton-Karma model along with a low-order finite element spatial discretization, we numerically analyze differences between the standard monodomain model and the hyperbolic monodomain model. In a simple benchmark test, we show that the propagation of the action potential is strongly influenced by the alignment of the fibers with respect to the mesh in both the parabolic and hyperbolic models when using relatively coarse spatial discretizations. Accurate predictions of the conduction velocity require computational mesh spacings on the order of a single cardiac cell. We also compare the two formulations in the case of spiral break up and atrial fibrillation in an anatomically detailed model of the left atrium, and [...].
  • PDF
    Kaczmarz method is one popular iterative method for solving inverse problems, especially in computed tomography. Recently, it was established that a randomized version of the method enjoys an exponential convergence for well-posed problems, and the convergence rate is determined by a variant of the condition number. In this work, we analyze the preasymptotic convergence behavior of the randomized Kaczmarz method, and show that the low-frequency error (with respect to the right singular vectors) decays faster during first iterations than the high-frequency error. Under the assumption that the inverse solution is smooth (e.g., sourcewise representation), the result explains the fast empirical convergence behavior, thereby shedding new insights into the excellent performance of the randomized Kaczmarz method in practice. Further, we propose a simple strategy to stabilize the asymptotic convergence of the iteration by means of variance reduction. We provide extensive numerical experiments to confirm the analysis and to elucidate the behavior of the algorithms.
  • PDF
    In the framework of uncertainty quantification, we consider a quantity of interest which depends non-smoothly on the high-dimensional parameter representing the uncertainty. We show that, in this situation, the multilevel Monte Carlo algorithm is a valid option to compute moments of the quantity of interest (here we focus on the expectation), as it allows to bypass the precise location of discontinuities in the parameter space. We illustrate how such lack of smoothness occurs for the point evaluation of the solution to a (Helmholtz) transmission problem with uncertain interface, if the point can be crossed by the interface for some realizations. For this case, we provide a space regularity analysis for the solution, in order to state converge results in the L1-norm for the finite element discretization. The latter are then used to determine the optimal distribution of samples among the Monte Carlo levels. Particular emphasis is given on the robustness of our estimates with respect to the dimension of the parameter space.
  • PDF
    Solving sparse recovery problem with high oversampling ratio is hard. We show that it is theoretically possible and we propose two modified HTP algorithms with such performances.
  • PDF
    The $p$-set, which is in a simple analytic form, is well distributed in unit cubes. The well-known Weil's exponential sum theorem presents an upper bound of the exponential sum over the $p$-set. Based on the result, one shows that the $p$-set performs well in numerical integration, in compressed sensing as well as in UQ. However, $p$-set is somewhat rigid since the cardinality of the $p$-set is a prime $p$ and the set only depends on the prime number $p$. The purpose of this paper is to present generalizations of $p$-sets, say $\mathcal{P}_{d,p}^{{\mathbf a},\epsilon}$, which is more flexible. Particularly, when a prime number $p$ is given, we have many different choices of the new $p$-sets. Under the assumption that Goldbach conjecture holds, for any even number $m$, we present a point set, say ${\mathcal L}_{p,q}$, with cardinality $m-1$ by combining two different new $p$-sets, which overcomes a major bottleneck of the $p$-set. We also present the upper bounds of the exponential sums over $\mathcal{P}_{d,p}^{{\mathbf a},\epsilon}$ and ${\mathcal L}_{p,q}$, which imply these sets have many potential applications.
  • PDF
    In a recent arXiv paper the author introduced a simple alternative to isoparametric finite elements of the $N$-simplex type, to enhance the accuracy of approximations of boundary value problems with Dirichlet boundary conditions, posed in smooth curved two-dimensional domains. This technique is based upon trial-functions consisting of piecewise polynomials defined on triangular meshes forming a sequence of approximating polygons, interpolating the Dirichlet boundary conditions at points of the true boundary. In contrast the test-functions are defined upon the standard degrees of freedom associated with the method in use. In this work this method is extended to problems posed in three-dimensional curved domains solved with tetrahedron-based finite element methods. Although the method is as universal as can be, for the sake of simplicity we consider as a model the Poisson equation. Optimal a priori error estimates of arbitrary order are derived for the classical lagrangean family of finite elements. A series of numerical examples illustrates the potential of this technique.
  • PDF
    This paper derives physically meaningful boundary conditions for fractional diffusion equations, using a mass balance approach. Numerical solutions are presented, and theoretical properties are reviewed, including well-posedness and steady state solutions. Absorbing and reflecting boundary conditions are considered, and illustrated through several examples. Reflecting boundary conditions involve fractional derivatives. The Caputo fractional derivative is shown to be unsuitable for modeling fractional diffusion, since the resulting boundary value problem is not positivity preserving.
  • PDF
    Based on experimental traffic data obtained from German and US highways, we propose a novel two-dimensional first-order macroscopic traffic flow model. The goal is to reproduce a detailed description of traffic dynamic for the real road geometry. In our approach both the dynamic along the road and across the lanes is continuous. The closure relations, being necessary to complete the hydrodynamic equation, are obtained by regression on fundamental diagram data. Comparison with prediction of one-dimensional models shows the improvement in performance of the novel model.
  • PDF
    Low-rank approximations are popular techniques to reduce the high computational cost of large-scale kernel matrices, which are of significant interest in many applications. The success of low-rank methods hinges on the matrix rank, and in practice, these methods are effective even for high-dimensional datasets. The practical success has elicited the theoretical analysis of the rank in this paper. We will consider radial basis functions (RBF) and present theorems on the rank and error bounds. Our three main results are as follows. First, the rank of RBFs grows polynomially with the data dimension, in the worst case; second, precise approximation error bounds in terms of function properties and data structures are derived; and last, a group pattern in the decay of singular values for RBF kernel matrices is analyzed, and is explained by a grouping of the expansion terms. Empirical results verify and illustrate the theoretical results.