Group Theory (math.GR)

  • Feb 28 2017 math.GR math.CT math.DG arXiv:1702.08282v1
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    We explain that general differential calculus and Lie theory have a common foundation: Lie Calculus is differential calculus, seen from the point of view of Lie theory, by making use of the groupoid concept as link between them. Higher order theory naturally involves higher algebra (n-fold groupoids). Keywords: (conceptual, topological) differential calculus, groupoids, higher algebra($n$-fold groupoids), Lie group, Lie groupoid, tangent groupoid, cubes of rings
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    In the present article we introduce and study a class of topological reflection spaces that we call Kac-Moody symmetric spaces. These are associated with split real Kac-Moody groups and generalize Riemannian symmetric spaces of non-compact type. Based on preliminary work by the third-named author we observe that in a non-spherical Kac-Moody symmetric space there exist pairs of points that do not lie on a common geodesic; however, any two points can be connected by a chain of geodesic segments. We moreover classify maximal flats in Kac-Moody symmetric spaces and study their intersection patterns, leading to a classification of global and local automorphisms. Furthermore, we define a notion of asymptoticity for certain geodesic rays in a Kac-Moody symmetric space and use it to define a partial boundary. We show that such a partial boundary is simplicially isomorphic to the geometric realization of the twin buildings of the underlying split real Kac-Moody group, and show that every automorphism of the symmetric space is uniquely determined by the induced simplicial automorphism of the partial boundary. Altogether it turns out that Kac-Moody symmetric spaces share several properties with Riemannian symmetric spaces; in many respects they behave similarly to hovels, their non-Archimedean cousins. Some of our methods apply to general topological reflection spaces beyond the Kac-Moody setting.
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    Sometimes it is possible to embed an algebraic trapdoor in a block cipher. Building on previous research, in this paper we investigate an especially dangerous algebraic structure, which is called a hidden sum and which is related to some regular subgroups of the affine group. Mixing group theory arguments and cryptographic tools, we pass from characterizing our hidden sums to designing an efficient algorithm to perform the necessary preprocessing for the exploitation of the trapdoor.
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    The Markoff group of transformations is a group $\Gamma$ of affine integral morphisms, which is known to act transitively on the set of all positive integer solutions to the equation $x^{2}+y^{2}+z^{2}=xyz$. The fundamental strong approximation conjecture for the Markoff equation states that for every prime $p$, the group $\Gamma$ acts transitively on the set $X^{*}\left(p\right)$ of non-zero solutions to the same equation over $\mathbb{Z}/p\mathbb{Z}$. Recently, Bourgain, Gamburd and Sarnak proved this conjecture for all primes outside a small exceptional set. In the current paper, we study a group of permutations obtained by the action of $\Gamma$ on $X^{*}\left(p\right)$, and show that for most primes, it is the full symmetric or alternating group. We use this result to deduce that $\Gamma$ acts transitively also on the set of non-zero solutions in a big class of composite moduli. Our result is also related to a well-known theorem of Gilman, stating that for any finite non-abelian simple group $G$ and $r\ge3$, the group $\mathrm{Aut}\left(F_{r}\right)$ acts on at least one $T_{r}$-system of $G$ as the alternating or symmetric group. In this language, our main result translates to that for most primes $p$, the group $\mathrm{Aut}\left(F_{2}\right)$ acts on a particular $T_{2}$-system of $\mathrm{PSL}\left(2,p\right)$ as the alternating or symmetric group.
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    A regular $t$-balanced Cayley map (RBCM$_t$ for short) on a group $\Gamma$ is an embedding of a Cayley graph on $\Gamma$ into a surface with some special symmetric properties. We propose a reduction method to study RBCM$_t$'s, and as a first practice, we completely classify RBCM$_t$'s for a class of split metacyclic 2-groups.
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    We prove that for every $r>0$ if a non-positively curved $(p,q)$-map $M$ contains no flat submaps of radius $r$, then the area of $M$ does not exceed $Crn$ for some constant $C$. This strengthens a theorem of Ivanov and Schupp. We show that an infinite $(p,q)$-map which tessellates the plane is quasi-isometric to the Euclidean plane if and only if the map contains only finitely many non-flat vertices and faces. We also generalize Ivanov and Schupp's result to a much larger class of maps, namely to maps with angle functions.
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    Answering a question asked by Agol and Wise, we show that a desired stronger form of Wise's malnormal special quotient theorem does not hold. The counterexamples are generalizations of triangle groups, built using the Ramanujan graphs constructed by Lubotzky--Phillips--Sarnak.
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    The role of finite centralizers of involutions in pseudo-finite groups is analyzed. Using basic techniques from infinite group theory, it is shown that a pseudo-finite group admitting a definable involutory automorphism fixing only finitely many elements is finite-by-abelian-by-finite. As a consequence, an alternative proof of the corresponding result for periodic groups due to Hartley and Meixner is given, as well as a gently improvement regarding definable properties. Furthermore, it is shown that any pseudo-finite group has an infinite abelian subgroup, and that in any pseudo-finite group in which the centralizer of any element is finite or has finite index, the FC-center is a finite index definable subgroup.
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    Given a pseudoword over suitable pseudovarieties, we associate to it a labeled linear order determined by the factorizations of the pseudoword. We show that, in the case of the pseudovariety of aperiodic finite semigroups, the pseudoword can be recovered from the labeled linear order.
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    This is the second part of a two part work in which we prove that for every finitely generated subgroup $\Gamma < \mathsf{Out}(F_n)$, either $\Gamma$ is virtually abelian or its second bounded cohomology $H^2_b(\Gamma;\mathbb{R})$ contains an embedding of $\ell^1$. Here in Part II we focus on finite lamination subgroups $\Gamma$ --- meaning that the set of all attracting laminations of elements of $\Gamma$ is finite --- and on the construction of hyperbolic actions of those subgroups to which the general theory of Part I is applicable.
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    We show that every group in a large family of (not necessarily torsion) spinal groups acting on the ternary rooted tree is of subexponential growth.
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    We investigate the action of outer automorphisms of finite groups of Lie type on their irreducible characters. We obtain a definite result for cuspidal characters. As an application we verify the inductive McKay condition for some further infinite families of simple groups at certain primes.
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    We note a generalization of Whyte's geometric solution to the von Neumann problem for locally compact groups in terms of Borel and clopen piecewise translations. This strengthens a result of Paterson on the existence of Borel paradoxical decompositions for non-amenable locally compact groups. Along the way, we study the connection between some geometric properties of coarse spaces and certain algebraic characteristics of their wobbling groups.
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    We prove that profinite completions of Burnside-type surface group quotients are not virtually prosolvable, in general.
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    A theorem of Myasnikov and Roman'kov says that any verbally closed subgroup of a finitely generated free group is a retract. We prove that all free (and many virtually free) verbally closed subgroups are retracts in any finitely generated group.

Recent comments

Robert Raussendorf Jan 24 2017 22:29 UTC

Regarding Mark's above comment on the role of the stabilizer states: Yes, all previous works on the subject have used the stabilizer states and Clifford gates as the classical backbone. This is due to the Gottesman-Knill theorem and related results. But is it a given that the free sector in quantum

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Planat Jan 24 2017 13:09 UTC

Are you sure? Since we do not propose a conjecture, there is nothing wrong. A class of strange states underlie the pentagons in question. The motivation is to put the magic of computation in the permutation frame, one needs more work to check its relevance.

Mark Howard Jan 24 2017 09:59 UTC

It seems interesting at first sight, but after reading it the motivation is very muddled. It boils down to finding pentagons (which enable KCBS-style proofs of contextuality) within sets of projectors, some of which are stabilizer states and some of which are non-stabilizer states (called magic stat

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