Dynamical Systems (math.DS)

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    We prove that every topologically transitive shift of finite type in one dimension is topologically conjugate to a subshift arising from a primitive random substitution on a finite alphabet. As a result, we show that the set of values of topological entropy which can be attained by random substitution subshifts contains all Perron numbers and so is dense in the positive real numbers. We also provide an independent proof of this density statement using elementary methods.
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    We define what it means for a proper continuous morphism between groupoids to be Haar system preserving, and show that such a morphism induces (via pullback) a *-morphism between the corresponding convolution algebras. We prove that an inverse system of groupoids with Haar system preserving bonding maps has a limit, and that we get a corresponding direct system of groupoid $C^*$-algebras. An explicit construction of an inverse system of groupoids is used to approximate a $\sigma$-compact groupoid $G$ by second countable groupoids; if $G$ is equipped with a Haar system and 2-cocycle then so are the approximation groupoids, and the maps in the inverse system are Haar system preserving. As an application of this construction, we show how to easily extend the Maximal Equivalence Theorem of Jean Renault to $\sigma$-compact groupoids.
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    The identification of meaningful reaction coordinates plays a key role in the study of complex molecular systems whose essential dynamics is characterized by rare or slow transition events. In a recent publication, the authors identified a condition under which such reaction coordinates exist - the existence of a so-called transition manifold - and proposed a numerical method for their point-wise computation that relies on short bursts of MD simulations. This article represents an extension of the method towards practical applicability in computational chemistry. It describes an alternative computational scheme that instead relies on more commonly available types of simulation data, such as single long molecular trajectories, or the push-forward of arbitrary canonically-distributed point clouds. It is based on a Galerkin approximation of the transition manifold reaction coordinates, that can be tuned to individual requirements by the choice of the Galerkin ansatz functions. Moreover, we propose a ready-to-implement variant of the new scheme, that computes data-fitted, mesh-free ansatz functions directly from the available simulation data. The efficacy of the new method is demonstrated on a realistic peptide system.
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    In this note we show existence of bounded, transitive cocycles over a transitive action of a finitely generated group, and bounded, ergodic cocycles over an ergodic, probability preserving action of $\Bbb Z^d$.
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    In this paper we obtain a detailed description of the global and cocycle attractors for the skew-product semiflows induced by the mild solutions of a family of scalar linear-dissipative parabolic problems over a minimal and uniquely ergodic flow. We consider the case of null upper Lyapunov exponent for the linear part of the problem. Then, two different types of attractors can appear, depending on whether the linear equations have a bounded or an unbounded associated real cocycle. In the first case (e.g.~in periodic equations), the structure of the attractor is simple, whereas in the second case (which occurs in aperiodic equations), the attractor is a pinched set with a complicated structure. We describe situations when the attractor is chaotic in measure in the sense of Li-Yorke. Besides, we obtain a non-autonomous discontinuous pitchfork bifurcation scenario for concave equations, applicable for instance to a linear-dissipative version of the Chafee-Infante equation.
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    We study the Fluctuation Theorem (FT) for entropy production in chaotic discrete-time dynamical systems on compact metric spaces, and extend it to empirical measures, all continuous potentials, and all weak Gibbs states. In particular, we establish the FT in the phase transition regime. These results hold under minimal chaoticity assumptions (expansiveness and specification) and require no ergodicity conditions. They are also valid for systems that are not necessarily invertible and involutions other than time reversal. Further extensions involve asymptotically additive potential sequences and the corresponding weak Gibbs measures. The generality of these results allows to view the FT as a structural facet of the thermodynamic formalism of dynamical systems.
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    Let a countable amenable group $G$ act on a \zd compact metric space $X$. For two clopen subsets $\mathsf A$ and $\mathsf B$ of $X$ we say that $\mathsf A$ is \emphsubequivalent to $\mathsf B$ (we write $\mathsf A\preccurlyeq \mathsf B$), if there exists a finite partition $\mathsf A=\bigcup_{i=1}^k \mathsf A_i$ of $\mathsf A$ into clopen sets and there are elements $g_1,g_2,\dots,g_k$ in $G$ such that $g_1(\mathsf A_1), g_2(\mathsf A_2),\dots, g_k(\mathsf A_k)$ are disjoint subsets of $\mathsf B$. We say that the action \emphadmits comparison if for any clopen sets $\mathsf A, \mathsf B$, the condition, that for every $G$-invariant probability measure $\mu$ on $X$ we have the sharp inequality $\mu(\mathsf A)<\mu(\mathsf B)$, implies $\mathsf A\preccurlyeq \mathsf B$. Comparison has many desired consequences for the action, such as the existence of tilings with arbitrarily good Følner properties, which are factors of the action. Also, the theory of symbolic extensions, known for $\mathbb z$-actions, extends to actions which admit comparison. We also study a purely group-theoretic notion of comparison: if every action of $G$ on any zero-dimensional compact metric space admits comparison then we say that $G$ has the \emphcomparison property. Classical groups $\mathbb z$ and $\mathbb z^d$ enjoy the comparison property, but in the general case the problem remains open. In this paper we prove this property for groups whose every finitely generated subgroup has subexponential growth.
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    The characterization of intermittent, multiscale and transient dynamics using data-driven analysis remains an open challenge. We demonstrate an application of the Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) with sparse sampling for the diagnostic analysis of multiscale physics. The DMD method is an ideal spatiotemporal matrix decomposition that correlates spatial features of computational or experimental data to periodic temporal behavior. DMD can be modified into a multiresolution analysis to separate complex dynamics into a hierarchy of multiresolution timescale components, where each level of the hierarchy divides dynamics into distinct background (slow) and foreground (fast) timescales. The multiresolution DMD is capable of characterizing nonlinear dynamical systems in an equation-free manner by recursively decomposing the state of the system into low-rank spatial modes and their temporal Fourier dynamics. Moreover, these multiresolution DMD modes can be used to determined sparse sampling locations which are nearly optimal for dynamic regime classification and full state reconstruction. Specifically, optimized sensors are efficiently chosen using QR column pivots of the DMD library, thus avoiding an NP-hard selection process. We demonstrate the efficacy of the method on several examples, including global sea-surface temperature data, and show that only a small number of sensors are needed for accurate global reconstructions and classification of El Niño events.
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    Some viruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus, can infect several types of cell populations. The age of infection can also affect the dynamics of infected cells and production of viral particles. In this work, we study a virus model with infection-age and different types of target cells which takes into account the saturation effect in antibody immune response and a general non-linear infection rate. We construct suitable Lyapunov functionals to show that the global dynamics of the model is completely determined by two critical values: the basic reproduction number of virus and the reproductive number of antibody response.