Audio and Speech Processing (eess.AS)

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    In this paper, we propose a simple yet effective method for multiple music source separation using convolutional neural networks. Stacked hourglass network, which was originally designed for human pose estimation in natural images, is applied to a music source separation task. The network learns features from a spectrogram image across multiple scales and generates masks for each music source. The estimated mask is refined as it passes over stacked hourglass modules. The proposed framework is able to separate multiple music sources using a single network. Experimental results on MIR-1K and DSD100 datasets validate that the proposed method achieves competitive results comparable to the state-of-the-art methods in multiple music source separation and singing voice separation tasks.
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    Timbre spaces have been used in music perception to study the relationships between instruments based on dissimilarity ratings. However, these spaces do not generalize, need to be reconstructed for each novel example and are not continuous, preventing audio synthesis. In parallel, generative models have aimed to provide methods for synthesizing novel timbres. However, these systems do not provide an explicit control structure, nor do they provide an understanding of their inner workings and are not related to any perceptually relevant information. Here, we show that Variational Auto-Encoders (VAE) can alleviate these limitations by constructing generative timbre spaces. To do so, we adapt VAEs to create a generative latent space, while using perceptual ratings from timbre studies to regularize the organization of this space. The resulting space allows to analyze novel instruments, while being able to synthesize audio from any point of this space. We introduce a specific regularization allowing to directly enforce given similarity ratings onto these spaces. We compare the resulting space to existing timbre spaces and show that they provide almost similar distance relationships. We evaluate several spectral transforms and show that the Non-Stationary Gabor Transform (NSGT) provides the highest correlation to timbre spaces and the best quality of synthesis. We show that these spaces can generalize to novel instruments and can generate any path between instruments to understand their timbre relationships. As these spaces are continuous, we study how the traditional acoustic descriptors behave along the latent dimensions. We show that descriptors have an overall non-linear topology, but follow a locally smooth evolution. Based on this, we introduce a method for descriptor-based synthesis and show that we can control the descriptors of an instrument while keeping its timbre structure.
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    Speaker clustering is the task of forming speaker-specific groups based on a set of utterances. In this paper, we address this task by using Dominant Sets (DS). DS is a graph-based clustering algorithm with interesting properties that fits well to our problem and has never been applied before to speaker clustering. We report on a comprehensive set of experiments on the TIMIT dataset against standard clustering techniques and specific speaker clustering methods. Moreover, we compare performances under different features by using ones learned via deep neural network directly on TIMIT and other ones extracted from a pre-trained VGGVox net. To asses the stability, we perform a sensitivity analysis on the free parameters of our method, showing that performance is stable under parameter changes. The extensive experimentation carried out confirms the validity of the proposed method, reporting state-of-the-art results under three different standard metrics. We also report reference baseline results for speaker clustering on the entire TIMIT dataset for the first time.
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    Recent advances in neural network based acoustic modelling have shown significant improvements in automatic speech recognition (ASR) performance. In order for acoustic models to be able to handle large acoustic variability, large amounts of labeled data is necessary, which are often expensive to obtain. This paper explores the application of adversarial training to learn features from raw speech that are invariant to acoustic variability. This acoustic variability is referred to as a domain shift in this paper. The experimental study presented in this paper leverages the architecture of Domain Adversarial Neural Networks (DANNs) [1] which uses data from two different domains. The DANN is a Y-shaped network that consists of a multi-layer CNN feature extractor module that is common to a label (senone) classifier and a so-called domain classifier. The utility of DANNs is evaluated on multiple datasets with domain shifts caused due to differences in gender and speaker accents. Promising empirical results indicate the strength of adversarial training for unsupervised domain adaptation in ASR, thereby emphasizing the ability of DANNs to learn domain invariant features from raw speech.