Systems and Control (cs.SY)

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    In this paper we consider a network of spatially distributed sensors which collect measurement samples of a spatial field, and aim at estimating in a distributed way (without any central coordinator) the entire field by suitably fusing all network data. We propose a general probabilistic model that can handle both partial knowledge of the physics generating the spatial field as well as a purely data-driven inference. Specifically, we adopt an Empirical Bayes approach in which the spatial field is modeled as a Gaussian Process, whose mean function is described by means of parametrized equations. We characterize the Empirical Bayes estimator when nodes are heterogeneous, i.e., perform a different number of measurements. Moreover, by exploiting the sparsity of both the covariance and the (parametrized) mean function of the Gaussian Process, we are able to design a distributed spatial field estimator. We corroborate the theoretical results with two numerical simulations: a stationary temperature field estimation in which the field is described by a partial differential (heat) equation, and a data driven inference in which the mean is parametrized by a cubic spline.
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    A robust Model Predictive Control (MPC) approach for controlling front steering of an autonomous vehicle is presented in this paper. We present various approaches to increase the robustness of model predictive control by using weight tuning, a successive on-line linearization of a nonlinear vehicle model to track position error and successive on-line linearization to track velocity error. Results of the effectiveness of each method in terms of accuracy and computational load are discussed.
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    The minimum-gain eigenvalue assignment/pole placement problem (MGEAP) is a classical problem in LTI systems with static state feedback. In this paper, we study the MGEAP when the state feedback has arbitrary sparsity constraints. We formulate the sparse MGEAP problem as an equality-constrained optimization problem and present an analytical characterization of its solution in terms of eigenvector matrices of the closed loop system. This result is used to provide a geometric interpretation of the solution of the non-sparse MGEAP, thereby providing additional insights for this classical problem. Further, we develop an iterative projected gradient descent algorithm to solve the sparse MGEAP using a parametrization based on the Sylvester equation. We present a heuristic algorithm to compute the projections, which also provides a novel method to solve the sparse EAP. Also, a relaxed version of the sparse MGEAP is presented and an algorithm is developed to obtain approximately sparse solutions to the MGEAP. Finally, numerical studies are presented to compare the properties of the algorithms, which suggest that the proposed projection algorithm converges in almost all instances.
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    In this paper, we propose a distributed version of the Hungarian Method to solve the well known assignment problem. In the context of multi-robot applications, all robots cooperatively compute a common assignment that optimizes a given global criterion (e.g. the total distance traveled) within a finite set of local computations and communications over a peer-to-peer network. As a motivating application, we consider a class of multi-robot routing problems with "spatio-temporal" constraints, i.e. spatial targets that require servicing at particular time instants. As a means of demonstrating the theory developed in this paper, the robots cooperatively find online, suboptimal routes by applying an iterative version of the proposed algorithm, in a distributed and dynamic setting. As a concrete experimental test-bed, we provide an interactive "multi-robot orchestral" framework in which a team of robots cooperatively plays a piece of music on a so-called orchestral floor.
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    In this paper we consider a novel partitioned framework for distributed optimization in peer-to-peer networks. In several important applications the agents of a network have to solve an optimization problem with two key features: (i) the dimension of the decision variable depends on the network size, and (ii) cost function and constraints have a sparsity structure related to the communication graph. For this class of problems a straightforward application of existing consensus methods would show two inefficiencies: poor scalability and redundancy of shared information. We propose an asynchronous distributed algorithm, based on dual decomposition and coordinate methods, to solve partitioned optimization problems. We show that, by exploiting the problem structure, the solution can be partitioned among the nodes, so that each node just stores a local copy of a portion of the decision variable (rather than a copy of the entire decision vector) and solves a small-scale local problem.
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    We consider multi-agent systems interacting over directed network topologies where a subset of agents is adversary/faulty and where the non-faulty agents have the goal of reaching consensus, while fulfilling a differential privacy requirement on their initial conditions. In order to address this problem, we develop an update law for the non-faulty agents. Specifically, we propose a modification of the so called Mean-Subsequence-Reduced (MSR) algorithm, the Differentially Private MSR (DP-MSR) algorithm, and characterize three important properties of the algorithm: correctness, accuracy and differential privacy. We show that if the network topology is $(2f +1)$-robust, then the algorithm allows the non-faulty agents to reach consensus despite the presence of up to $f$ faulty agents and we characterize the accuracy of the algorithm. Furthermore, we also show that in two special cases our distributed algorithm can be tuned to guarantees differential privacy of the initial conditions and the differential privacy requirement is related to the maximum network degree. The results are illustrated via simulations.
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    For parabolic PDEs, we present a new certainty equivalence-based adaptive boundary control scheme with a least-squares identifier of an event-triggering type, where the triggering is based on the size of the regulation error (as opposed to the identifier updates being triggered by the estimation error, or the control changes being triggered by the regulation error). The scheme guarantees exponential convergence of the state to zero in the L2 norm and a finite-time convergence of the parameter estimates to the true values of the unknown parameters. The scheme is developed for a specific benchmark problem with Dirichlet actuation, where the only unknown parameters are the reaction coefficient and the high-frequency gain. For this specific problem, no existing adaptive scheme can handle the unknown high-frequency gain. An illustrative example allows the comparison with other adaptive control design methodologies.
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    When considering unidirectional communication for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) as flying Base Stations (BSs), either uplink or downlink, the system is limited through the co-channel interference that takes place over line-of-sight (LoS) links. This paper considers two-way communication and takes advantage of the fact that the interference among the ground devices takes place through non-line-of-sight (NLoS) links. UAVs can be deployed at the high altitudes to have larger coverage, while the two-way communication allows to configure the transmission direction. Using these two levers, we show how the system throughput can be maximized for a given deployment of the ground devices.
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    A Second-order Nonlinear Differentiator (SOND) is presented in this paper. By combining both linear and nonlinear terms, this tracking differentiator shows better dynamical performances than other conventional differentiators do. The hyperbolic tangent tanh(.) function is introduced due to two reasons; firstly, the high slope of the continuous tanh(.) function near the origin significantly accelerates the convergence of the proposed tracking differentiator and reduces the chattering phenomenon. Secondly, the saturation feature of the function due to its nonlinearity increases the robustness against the noise components in the signal. The stability of the suggested tracking differentiator is proven based on the Lyapunov analysis. In addition, a frequency-based analysis is applied to investigate the dynamical performances. The performance of the proposed tracking differentiator has been tested in active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) paradigm, which is a recent robust control technique. The numerical simulations emphasize the expected improvements.