Systems and Control (cs.SY)

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    As the energy transition transforms power grids across the globe it poses several challenges regarding grid design and control. In particular, high levels of intermittent renewable generation complicate the job of continuously balancing power supply and demand, which is necessary for the grid's stability. Although there exist several proposals to control the grid, most of them have not demonstrated to be cost efficient in terms of optimal control theory. Here, we mathematically formulate the control problem for stable operation of power grids, determining the minimal amount of control in the active power needed to achieve the constraints, and minimizing a suitable cost function at the same time. We investigate the performance of the optimal control method with respect to the uncontrolled scenario and we compare it to a simple linear control case, for two types of external disturbances. Considering case studies with two and five nodes respectively, we find that the linear control can improve the synchronization and transient stability of the power grid. However, if the synchronized angular velocity after a disturbance is allowed to differ from its initial steady state value, the linear control performs inefficiently in comparison to the optimal one.
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    We consider the decidability of state-to-state reachability in linear time-invariant control systems, with control sets defined by boolean combinations of linear inequalities. Decidability of the sub-problem in which control sets are linear subspaces is a fundamental result in control theory. We first show that reachability is undecidable if the set of controls is a finite union of affine subspaces. We then consider two simple subclasses of control sets---unions of two affine subspaces and bounded convex polytopes respectively---and show that in these two cases the reachability problem for LTI systems is as hard as certain longstanding open decision problems concerning linear recurrence sequences. Finally we present some spectral assumptions on the transition matrix of an LTI system under which reachability becomes decidable with bounded convex polytopes as control sets.
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    Both humans and the sensors on an autonomous vehicle have limited sensing capabilities. When these limitations coincide with scenarios involving vulnerable road users, it becomes important to account for these limitations in the motion planner. For the scenario of an occluded pedestrian crosswalk, the speed of the approaching vehicle should be a function of the amount of uncertainty on the roadway. In this work, the longitudinal controller is formulated as a partially observable Markov decision process and dynamic programming is used to compute the control policy. The control policy scales the speed profile to be used by a model predictive steering controller.
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    Backlash, also known as mechanical play, is a piecewise differentiable nonlinearity which exists in several actuated systems, comprising, e.g., rack-and-pinion drives, shaft couplings, toothed gears, and other elements. Generally, the backlash is nested between the moving elements of a complex dynamic system, which handicaps its proper detection and identification. A classical example is the two-mass system which can approximate numerous mechanisms connected by a shaft (or link) with relatively high stiffness and backlash in series. Information about the presence and extent of the backlash is seldom exactly known and is rather conditional upon factors such as wear, fatigue and incipient failures in components. This paper proposes a novel backlash identification method using one-side sensing of a twomass system. The method is based on the delayed relay operator in feedback that allows stable and controllable limit cycles to be induced, operating within the unknown backlash gap. The system model, with structural transformations required for the one-side backlash measurements, is given, along with the analysis of the delayed relay in velocity feedback. Experimental evaluations are shown for a two-inertia motor bench with gear coupling, with a low backlash gap of about one degree.
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    A recent trend in distributed multi-sensor fusion is to use random finite set filters at the sensor nodes and fuse the filtered distributions algorithmically using their exponential mixture densities (EMDs). Fusion algorithms which extend the celebrated covariance intersection and consensus based approaches are such examples. In this article, we analyse the variational principle underlying EMDs and show that the EMDs of finite set distributions do not necessarily lead to consistent fusion of cardinality distributions. Indeed, we demonstrate that these inconsistencies may occur with overwhelming probability in practice, through examples with Bernoulli, Poisson and independent identically distributed (IID) cluster processes. We prove that pointwise consistency of EMDs does not imply consistency in global cardinality and vice versa. Then, we redefine the variational problems underlying fusion and provide iterative solutions thereby establishing a framework that guarantees cardinality consistent fusion.