Software Engineering (cs.SE)

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    In this paper, a new approach is proposed for automated software maintenance. The tool is able to perform 26 different refactorings. It also contains a large selection of metrics to measure the impact of the refactorings on the software and six different search based optimization algorithms to improve the software. This tool contains both mono-objective and multi-objective search techniques for software improvement and is fully automated. The paper describes the various capabilities of the tool, the unique aspects of it, and also presents some research results from experimentation. The individual metrics are tested across five different codebases to deduce the most effective metrics for general quality improvement. It is found that the metrics that relate to more specific elements of the code are more useful for driving change in the search. The mono-objective genetic algorithm is also tested against the multi-objective algorithm to see how comparable the results gained are with three separate objectives. When comparing the best solutions of each individual objective the multi-objective approach generates suitable improvements in quality in less time, allowing for rapid maintenance cycles.
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    Modern socio-technical systems are increasingly complex. A fundamental problem is that the borders of such systems are often not well-defined a-priori, which among other problems can lead to unwanted behavior during runtime. Ideally, unwanted behavior should be prevented. If this is not possible the system shall at least be able to help determine potential cause(s) a-posterori, identify responsible parties and make them accountable for their behavior. Recently, several algorithms addressing these concepts have been proposed. However, the applicability of the corresponding approaches, specifically their effectiveness and performance, is mostly unknown. Therefore, in this paper, we propose ACCBench, a benchmark tool that allows to compare and evaluate causality algorithms under a consistent setting. Furthermore, we contribute an implementation of the two causality algorithms by Gößler and Metayer and Gößler and Astefanoaei as well as of a policy compliance approach based on some concepts of Main et al. Lastly, we conduct a case study of an Intelligent Door Control System, which exposes concrete strengths and weaknesses of all algorithms under different aspects. In the course of this, we show that the effectiveness of the algorithms in terms of cause detection as well as their performance differ to some extent. In addition, our analysis reports on some qualitative aspects that should be considered when evaluating each algorithm. For example, the human effort needed to configure the algorithm and model the use case is analyzed.
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    This empirical paper examines the adoption of PHP releases in the the contemporary world wide web. Motivated by continuous software engineering practices and software traceability improvements for release engineering, the empirical analysis is based on big data collected by web crawling. According to the empirical results based on discrete time-homogeneous Markov chain (DTMC) analysis, (i)~adoption of PHP releases has been relatively uniform across the domains observed, (ii) which tend to also adopt either old or new PHP releases relatively infrequently. Although there are outliers, (iii) downgrading of PHP releases is generally rare. To some extent, (iv) the results vary between the recent history from 2016 to early 2017 and the long-run evolution in the 2010s. In addition to these empirical results, the paper contributes to the software evolution and release engineering research traditions by elaborating the applied use of DTMCs for systematic empirical tracing of online software deployments.
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    This short empirical paper investigates how well topic modeling and database meta-data characteristics can classify web and other proof-of-concept (PoC) exploits for publicly disclosed software vulnerabilities. By using a dataset comprised of over 36 thousand PoC exploits, near a 0.9 accuracy rate is obtained in the empirical experiment. Text mining and topic modeling are a significant boost factor behind this classification performance. In addition to these empirical results, the paper contributes to the research tradition of enhancing software vulnerability information with text mining, providing also a few scholarly observations about the potential for semi-automatic classification of exploits in the existing tracking infrastructures.