Sound (cs.SD)

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    Current speech enhancement techniques operate on the spectral domain and/or exploit some higher-level feature. The majority of them tackle a limited number of noise conditions and rely on first-order statistics. To circumvent these issues, deep networks are being increasingly used, thanks to their ability to learn complex functions from large example sets. In this work, we propose the use of generative adversarial networks for speech enhancement. In contrast to current techniques, we operate at the waveform level, training the model end-to-end, and incorporate 28 speakers and 40 different noise conditions into the same model, such that model parameters are shared across them. We evaluate the proposed model using an independent, unseen test set with two speakers and 20 alternative noise conditions. The enhanced samples confirm the viability of the proposed model, and both objective and subjective evaluations confirm the effectiveness of it. With that, we open the exploration of generative architectures for speech enhancement, which may progressively incorporate further speech-centric design choices to improve their performance.
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    In this study we present a Deep Mixture of Experts (DMoE) neural-network architecture for single microphone speech enhancement. By contrast to most speech enhancement algorithms that overlook the speech variability mainly caused by phoneme structure, our framework comprises a set of deep neural networks (DNNs), each one of which is an 'expert' in enhancing a given speech type corresponding to a phoneme. A gating DNN determines which expert is assigned to a given speech segment. A speech presence probability (SPP) is then obtained as a weighted average of the expert SPP decisions, with the weights determined by the gating DNN. A soft spectral attenuation, based on the SPP, is then applied to enhance the noisy speech signal. The experts and the gating components of the DMoE network are trained jointly. As part of the training, speech clustering into different subsets is performed in an unsupervised manner. Therefore, unlike previous methods, a phoneme-labeled database is not required for the training procedure. A series of experiments with different noise types verified the applicability of the new algorithm to the task of speech enhancement. The proposed scheme outperforms other schemes that either do not consider phoneme structure or use a simpler training methodology.