Robotics (cs.RO)

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    We propose AffordanceNet, a new deep learning approach to simultaneously detect multiple objects and their affordances from RGB images. Our AffordanceNet has two branches: an object detection branch to localize and classify the object, and an affordance detection branch to assign each pixel in the object to its most probable affordance label. The proposed framework employs three key components for effectively handling the multiclass problem in the affordance mask: a sequence of deconvolutional layers, a robust resizing strategy, and a multi-task loss function. The experimental results on the public datasets show that our AffordanceNet outperforms recent state-of-the-art methods by a fair margin, while its end-to-end architecture allows the inference at the speed of 150ms per image. This makes our AffordanceNet is well suitable for real-time robotic applications. Furthermore, we demonstrate the effectiveness of AffordanceNet in different testing environments and in real robotic applications. The source code and trained models will be made available.
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    In this paper, we present a general approach to automatically visual-servo control the position and shape of a deformable object whose deformation parameters are unknown. The servo-control is achieved by online learning a model mapping between the robotic end-effector's movement and the object's deformation measurement. The model is learned using the Gaussian Process Regression (GPR) to deal with its highly nonlinear property, and once learned, the model is used for predicting the required control at each time step. To overcome GPR's high computational cost while dealing with long manipulation sequences, we implement a fast online GPR by selectively removing uninformative observation data from the regression process. We validate the performance of our controller on a set of deformable object manipulation tasks and demonstrate that our method can achieve effective and accurate servo-control for general deformable objects with a wide variety of goal settings. Videos are available at https://sites.google.com/view/mso-fogpr.
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    We present an end-to-end imitation learning system for agile, off-road autonomous driving using only low-cost on-board sensors.By imitating an optimal controller, we train a deep neural network control policy to map raw, high-dimensional observations to continuous steering and throttle commands, the latter of which is essential to successfully drive on varied terrain at high speed. Compared with recent approaches to similar tasks, our method requires neither state estimation nor online planning to navigate the vehicle. Real-world experimental results demonstrate successful autonomous off-road driving, matching the state-of-the-art performance.
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    This paper presents SceneCut, a novel approach to jointly discover previously unseen objects and non-object surfaces using a single RGB-D image. SceneCut's joint reasoning over scene semantics and geometry allows a robot to detect and segment object instances in complex scenes where modern deep learning-based methods either fail to separate object instances, or fail to detect objects that were not seen during training. SceneCut automatically decomposes a scene into meaningful regions which either represent objects or scene surfaces. The decomposition is qualified by an unified energy function over objectness and geometric fitting. We show how this energy function can be optimized efficiently by utilizing hierarchical segmentation trees. Moreover, we leverage a pre-trained convolutional oriented boundary network to predict accurate boundaries from images, which are used to construct high-quality region hierarchies. We evaluate SceneCut on several different indoor environments, and the results show that SceneCut significantly outperforms all the existing methods.
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    We present a distributed algorithm for a swarm of active particles to camouflage in an environment. Each particle is equipped with sensing, computation and communication, allowing the system to take color and gradient information from the environment and self-organize into an appropriate pattern. Current artificial camouflage systems are either limited to static patterns, which are adapted for specific environments, or rely on back-projection, which depend on the viewer's point of view. Inspired by the camouflage abilities of the cuttlefish, we propose a distributed estimation and pattern formation algorithm that allows to quickly adapt to different environments. We present convergence results both in simulation as well as on a swarm of miniature robots "Droplets" for a variety of patterns.
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    We investigate robotic assistants for dressing that can anticipate the motion of the person who is being helped. To this end, we use reinforcement learning to create models of human behavior during assistance with dressing. To explore this kind of interaction, we assume that the robot presents an open sleeve of a hospital gown to a person, and that the person moves their arm into the sleeve. The controller that models the person's behavior is given the position of the end of the sleeve and information about contact between the person's hand and the fabric of the gown. We simulate this system with a human torso model that has realistic joint ranges, a simple robot gripper, and a physics-based cloth model for the gown. Through reinforcement learning (specifically the TRPO algorithm) the system creates a model of human behavior that is capable of placing the arm into the sleeve. We aim to model what humans are capable of doing, rather than what they typically do. We demonstrate successfully trained human behaviors for three robot-assisted dressing strategies: 1) the robot gripper holds the sleeve motionless, 2) the gripper moves the sleeve linearly towards the person from the front, and 3) the gripper moves the sleeve linearly from the side.
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    The goal of this paper is to present an end-to-end, data-driven framework to control Autonomous Mobility-on-Demand systems (AMoD, i.e. fleets of self-driving vehicles). We first model the AMoD system using a time-expanded network, and present a formulation that computes the optimal rebalancing strategy (i.e., preemptive repositioning) and the minimum feasible fleet size for a given travel demand. Then, we adapt this formulation to devise a Model Predictive Control (MPC) algorithm that leverages short-term demand forecasts based on historical data to compute rebalancing strategies. We test the end-to-end performance of this controller with a state-of-the-art LSTM neural network to predict customer demand and real customer data from DiDi Chuxing: we show that this approach scales very well for large systems (indeed, the computational complexity of the MPC algorithm does not depend on the number of customers and of vehicles in the system) and outperforms state-of-the-art rebalancing strategies by reducing the mean customer wait time by up to to 89.6%.
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    Cyclic pursuit frameworks provide an efficient way to create useful global behaviors out of pairwise interactions in a collective of autonomous robots. Earlier work studied cyclic pursuit with a constant bearing (CB) pursuit law, and has demonstrated the existence of a variety of interesting behaviors for the corresponding dynamics. In this work, by attaching multiple branches to a single cycle, we introduce a modified version of this framework which allows us to consider any weakly connected pursuit graph where each node has an outdegree of 1. This provides a further generalization of the cyclic pursuit setting. Then, after showing existence of relative equilibria (rectilinear or circling motion), pure shape equilibria (spiraling motion) and periodic orbits, we also derive necessary conditions for stability of a 3-agent collective. By paving a way for individual agents to join or leave a collective without perturbing the motion of others, our approach leads to improved reliability of the overall system.
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    This paper studies manipulator adaptive control when knowledge is shared by multiple robots through the cloud. We first consider the case of multiple robots manipulating a common object through synchronous centralized update laws to identify unknown inertial parameters. Through this development, we introduce a notion of Ensemble Sufficient Richness, wherein parameter converge can be enabled through teamwork in the group. The introduction of this property and the analysis of stable adaptive controllers that benefit from it constitute the main new contributions of this work. Building on this original example, we then consider decentralized update laws and the influence of communication delays on this process. Perhaps surprisingly, these nonidealized networked conditions inherit the same benefits of convergence being determined through ensemble effects for the group. Simple simulations of a planar manipulator identifying an unknown load are provided to illustrate the central idea and benefits of Ensemble Sufficient Richness.