Robotics (cs.RO)

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    We address the challenge of computing search paths in real-time for subsea applications where the goal is to locate an unknown number of targets on the seafloor. Our approach maximizes a formal definition of search effectiveness given finite search effort. We account for false positive measurements and variation in the performance of the search sensor due to geographic variation of the seafloor. We compare near-optimal search paths that can be computed in real-time with optimal search paths for which real-time computation is infeasible. We show how sonar data acquired for locating targets at a specific location can also be used to characterize the performance of the search sonar at that location. Our approach is illustrated with numerical experiments where search paths are planned using sonar data previously acquired from Boston Harbor.
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    In monocular vision systems, lack of knowledge about metric distances caused by the inherent scale ambiguity can be a strong limitation for some applications. We offer a method for fusing inertial measurements with monocular odometry or tracking to estimate metric distances in inertial-monocular systems and to increase the rate of pose estimates. As we performed the fusion in a loosely-coupled manner, each input block can be easily replaced with one's preference, which makes our method quite flexible. We experimented our method using the ORB-SLAM algorithm for the monocular tracking input and Euler forward integration to process the inertial measurements. We chose sets of data recorded on UAVs to design a suitable system for flying robots.
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    This paper presents a data-driven approach for multi-robot coordination in partially-observable domains based on Decentralized Partially Observable Markov Decision Processes (Dec-POMDPs) and macro-actions (MAs). Dec-POMDPs provide a general framework for cooperative sequential decision making under uncertainty and MAs allow temporally extended and asynchronous action execution. To date, most methods assume the underlying Dec-POMDP model is known a priori or a full simulator is available during planning time. Previous methods which aim to address these issues suffer from local optimality and sensitivity to initial conditions. Additionally, few hardware demonstrations involving a large team of heterogeneous robots and with long planning horizons exist. This work addresses these gaps by proposing an iterative sampling based Expectation-Maximization algorithm (iSEM) to learn polices using only trajectory data containing observations, MAs, and rewards. Our experiments show the algorithm is able to achieve better solution quality than the state-of-the-art learning-based methods. We implement two variants of multi-robot Search and Rescue (SAR) domains (with and without obstacles) on hardware to demonstrate the learned policies can effectively control a team of distributed robots to cooperate in a partially observable stochastic environment.
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    Semantic 3D mapping can be used for many applications such as robot navigation and virtual interaction. In recent years, there has been great progress in semantic segmentation and geometric 3D mapping. However, it is still challenging to combine these two tasks for accurate and large-scale semantic mapping from images. In the paper, we propose an incremental and (near) real-time semantic mapping system. A 3D scrolling occupancy grid map is built to represent the world, which is memory and computationally efficient and bounded for large scale environments. We utilize the CNN segmentation as prior prediction and further optimize 3D grid labels through a novel CRF model. Superpixels are utilized to enforce smoothness and form robust P N high order potential. An efficient mean field inference is developed for the graph optimization. We evaluate our system on the KITTI dataset and improve the segmentation accuracy by 10% over existing systems.
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    We investigate how a neural network can learn perception actions loops for navigation in unknown environments. Specifically, we consider how to learn to navigate in environments populated with cul-de-sacs that represent convex local minima that the robot could fall into instead of finding a set of feasible actions that take it to the goal. Traditional methods rely on maintaining a global map to solve the problem of over coming a long cul-de-sac. However, due to errors induced from local and global drift, it is highly challenging to maintain such a map for long periods of time. One way to mitigate this problem is by using learning techniques that do not rely on hand engineered map representations and instead output appropriate control policies directly from their sensory input. We first demonstrate that such a problem cannot be solved directly by deep reinforcement learning due to the sparse reward structure of the environment. Further, we demonstrate that deep supervised learning also cannot be used directly to solve this problem. We then investigate network models that offer a combination of reinforcement learning and supervised learning and highlight the significance of adding fully differentiable memory units to such networks. We evaluate our networks on their ability to generalize to new environments and show that adding memory to such networks offers huge jumps in performance
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    We introduce a novel formulation of motion planning, for continuous-time trajectories, as probabilistic inference. We first show how smooth continuous-time trajectories can be represented by a small number of states using sparse Gaussian process (GP) models. We next develop an efficient gradient-based optimization algorithm that exploits this sparsity and Gaussian process interpolation. We call this algorithm the Gaussian Process Motion Planner (GPMP). We then detail how motion planning problems can be formulated as probabilistic inference on a factor graph. This forms the basis for GPMP2, a very efficient algorithm that combines GP representations of trajectories with fast, structure-exploiting inference via numerical optimization. Finally, we extend GPMP2 to an incremental algorithm, iGPMP2, that can efficiently replan when conditions change. We benchmark our algorithms against several sampling-based and trajectory optimization-based motion planning algorithms on planning problems in multiple environments. Our evaluation reveals that GPMP2 is several times faster than previous algorithms while retaining robustness. We also benchmark iGPMP2 on replanning problems, and show that it can find successful solutions in a fraction of the time required by GPMP2 to replan from scratch.
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    This paper describes the vision based robotic picking system that was developed by our team, Team Applied Robotics, for the Amazon Picking Challenge 2016. This competition challenged teams to develop a robotic system that is able to pick a large variety of products from a shelve or a tote. We discuss the design considerations and our strategy, the high resolution 3D vision system, the use of a combination of texture and shape-based object detection algorithms, the robot path planning and object manipulators that were developed.
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    Time-Optimal Path Parameterization (TOPP) is a well-studied problem in robotics and has a wide range of applications. There are two main families of methods to address TOPP: Numerical Integration (NI) and Convex Optimization (CO). NI-based methods are fast but difficult to implement and suffer from robustness issues, while CO-based approaches are more robust but at the same time significantly slower. Here we propose a new approach to TOPP based on Reachability Analysis (RA). The key insight is to recursively compute reachable and controllable sets at discretized positions on the path by solving small Linear Programs (LPs). The resulting algorithm is faster than NI-based methods and as robust as CO-based ones (100% success rate), as confirmed by extensive numerical evaluations. Moreover, the proposed approach offers unique additional benefits: Admissible Velocity Propagation and robustness to parametric uncertainty can be derived from it in a simple and natural way.
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    Brain computer interface (BCI) provides promising applications in neuroprosthesis and neurorehabilitation by controlling computers and robotic devices based on the patient's intentions. Here, we have developed a novel BCI platform that controls a personalized social robot using noninvasively acquired brain signals. Scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) signals are collected from a user in real-time during tasks of imaginary movements. The imagined body kinematics are decoded using a regression model to calculate the user-intended velocity. Then, the decoded kinematic information is mapped to control the gestures of a social robot. The platform here may be utilized as a human-robot-interaction framework by combining with neurofeedback mechanisms to enhance the cognitive capability of persons with dementia.
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    Advances in deep learning over the last decade have led to a flurry of research in the application of deep artificial neural networks to robotic systems, with at least thirty papers published on the subject between 2014 and the present. This review discusses the applications, benefits, and limitations of deep learning vis-à-vis physical robotic systems, using contemporary research as exemplars. It is intended to communicate recent advances to the wider robotics community and inspire additional interest in and application of deep learning in robotics.
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    This work develops a tracking system based on an event-based camera. A bioinspired filtering algorithm to reduce noise and transmitted data while keeping the main features at the scene is implemented in FPGA which also serves as a network node. POWERLINK IEEE 61158 industrial network is used to communicate the FPGA with a controller connected to a self-developed two axis servo-controlled robot. The FPGA includes the network protocol to integrate the event-based camera as any other existing network node. The inverse kinematics for the robot is included in the controller. In addition, another network node is used to control pneumatic valves blowing the ball at different speed and trajectories. To complete the system and provide a comparison, a traditional frame-based camera is also connected to the controller. The imaging data for the tracking system are obtained either from the event-based or frame-based camera. Results show that the robot can accurately follow the ball using fast image recognition, with the intrinsic advantages of the event-based system (size, price, power). This works shows how the development of new equipment and algorithms can be efficiently integrated in an industrial system, merging commercial industrial equipment with the new devices so that new technologies can rapidly enter into the industrial field.
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    This paper proposes a single-shot approach for recognising clothing categories from 2.5D features. We propose two visual features, BSP (B-Spline Patch) and TSD (Topology Spatial Distances) for this task. The local BSP features are encoded by LLC (Locality-constrained Linear Coding) and fused with three different global features. Our visual feature is robust to deformable shapes and our approach is able to recognise the category of unknown clothing in unconstrained and random configurations. We integrated the category recognition pipeline with a stereo vision system, clothing instance detection, and dual-arm manipulators to achieve an autonomous sorting system. To verify the performance of our proposed method, we build a high-resolution RGBD clothing dataset of 50 clothing items of 5 categories sampled in random configurations (a total of 2,100 clothing samples). Experimental results show that our approach is able to reach 83.2\% accuracy while classifying clothing items which were previously unseen during training. This advances beyond the previous state-of-the-art by 36.2\%. Finally, we evaluate the proposed approach in an autonomous robot sorting system, in which the robot recognises a clothing item from an unconstrained pile, grasps it, and sorts it into a box according to its category. Our proposed sorting system achieves reasonable sorting success rates with single-shot perception.
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    This paper develops a method to use RGB-D cameras to track the motions of a human spinal cord injury patient undergoing spinal stimulation and physical rehabilitation. Because clinicians must remain close to the patient during training sessions, the patient is usually under permanent and transient occlusions due to the training equipment and the movements of the attending clinicians. These occlusions can significantly degrade the accuracy of existing human tracking methods. To improve the data association problem in these circumstances, we present a new global feature based on the geodesic distances of surface mesh points to a set of \em anchor points. Transient occlusions are handled via a multi-hypothesis tracking framework. To evaluate the method, we simulated different occlusion sizes on a data set captured from a human in varying movement patterns, and compared the proposed feature with other tracking methods. The results show that the proposed method achieves robustness to both surface deformations and transient occlusions.
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    We study an optimization problem that arises in the design of covering strategies for multi-robot systems. Consider a team of $n$ cooperating robots traveling along predetermined closed and disjoint trajectories. Each robot needs to periodically communicate information to nearby robots. At places where two trajectories are within range of each other, a communication link is established, allowing two robots to exchange information, provided they are "synchronized", i.e., they visit the link at the same time. In this setting a communication graph is defined and a system of robots is called \emphsynchronized if every pair of neighbors is synchronized. If one or more robots leave the system, then some trajectories are left unattended. To handle such cases in a synchronized system, when a live robot arrives to a communication link and detects the absence of the neighbor, it shifts to the neighboring trajectory to assume the unattended task. If enough robots leave, it may occur that a live robot enters a state of \emphstarvation, failing to permanently meet other robots during flight. To measure the tolerance of the system under this phenomenon we define the \emph$k$-resilience as the minimum number of robots whose removal may cause $k$ surviving robots to enter a state of starvation. We show that the problem of computing the $k$-resilience is NP-hard if $k$ is part of the input, even if the communication graph is a tree. We propose algorithms to compute the $k$-resilience for constant values of $k$ in general communication graphs and show more efficient algorithms for systems whose communication graph is a tree.
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    Magnetometers, gyroscopes and accelerometers are commonly used sensors in a variety of applications. The paper proposes a novel gyroscope calibration method in the homogeneous magnetic field by the help of magnetometer. It is shown that, with sufficient rotation excitation, the homogeneous magnetic field vector can be exploited to serve as a good reference for calibrating low-cost gyroscopes. The calibration parameters include the gyroscope scale factor, non-orthogonal coefficient and bias for three axes, as well as its misalignment to the magnetometer frame. Simulation and field test results demonstrate the method's effectiveness.
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    The Robot Operating System (ROS) is rapidly becoming the de facto framework for building robotics systems, thanks to its flexibility and the large acceptance that it has received in the robotics community. With the growth of its popularity, it has started to be used in multi-robot systems as well. However, the TCP connections that the platform relies on for connecting the so-called ROS nodes, presents several issues in terms of limited-bandwidth, delays and jitter, when used in wireless ad-hoc networks. In this paper, we present a thorough analysis of the problem and propose a new ROS node called Pound to improve the wireless communication performance. Pound allows the use of multiple ROS cores and introduces a priority scheme favoring more important flows over less important ones, thus reducing delay and jitter over single-hop and multihop networks. We compare Pound to the state-of-the-art solutions and show that it performs equally well, or better in all the test cases, including a control-over-network example.