Performance (cs.PF)

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    Rate adaptation and transmission power control in 802.11 WLANs have received a lot of attention from the research community, with most of the proposals aiming at maximising throughput based on network conditions. Considering energy consumption, an implicit assumption is that optimality in throughput implies optimality in energy efficiency, but this assumption has been recently put into question. In this paper, we address via analysis, simulation and experimentation the relation between throughput performance and energy efficiency in multi-rate 802.11 scenarios. We demonstrate the trade-off between these performance figures, confirming that they may not be simultaneously optimised, and analyse their sensitivity towards the energy consumption parameters of the device. We analyse this trade-off in existing rate adaptation with transmission power control algorithms, and discuss how to design novel schemes taking energy consumption into account.
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    In this paper, we revisit the idea of putting interfaces to sleep during 'packet overhearing' (i.e., when there are ongoing transmissions addressed to other stations) from a practical standpoint. To this aim, we perform a robust experimental characterisation of the timing and consumption behaviour of a commercial 802.11 card. We design $\mu$Nap, a local standard-compliant energy-saving mechanism that leverages micro-sleep opportunities inherent to the CSMA operation of 802.11 WLANs. This mechanism is backwards compatible and incrementally deployable, and takes into account the timing limitations of existing hardware, as well as practical CSMA-related issues (e.g., capture effect). According to the performance assessment carried out through trace-based simulation, the use of our scheme would result in a 57% reduction in the time spent in overhearing, thus leading to an energy saving of 15.8% of the activity time.