Performance (cs.PF)

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    "How much energy is consumed for an inference made by a convolutional neural network (CNN)?" With the increased popularity of CNNs deployed on the wide-spectrum of platforms (from mobile devices to workstations), the answer to this question has drawn significant attention. From lengthening battery life of mobile devices to reducing the energy bill of a datacenter, it is important to understand the energy efficiency of CNNs during serving for making an inference, before actually training the model. In this work, we propose NeuralPower: a layer-wise predictive framework based on sparse polynomial regression, for predicting the serving energy consumption of a CNN deployed on any GPU platform. Given the architecture of a CNN, NeuralPower provides an accurate prediction and breakdown for power and runtime across all layers in the whole network, helping machine learners quickly identify the power, runtime, or energy bottlenecks. We also propose the "energy-precision ratio" (EPR) metric to guide machine learners in selecting an energy-efficient CNN architecture that better trades off the energy consumption and prediction accuracy. The experimental results show that the prediction accuracy of the proposed NeuralPower outperforms the best published model to date, yielding an improvement in accuracy of up to 68.5%. We also assess the accuracy of predictions at the network level, by predicting the runtime, power, and energy of state-of-the-art CNN architectures, achieving an average accuracy of 88.24% in runtime, 88.34% in power, and 97.21% in energy. We comprehensively corroborate the effectiveness of NeuralPower as a powerful framework for machine learners by testing it on different GPU platforms and Deep Learning software tools.
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    Modern socio-technical systems are increasingly complex. A fundamental problem is that the borders of such systems are often not well-defined a-priori, which among other problems can lead to unwanted behavior during runtime. Ideally, unwanted behavior should be prevented. If this is not possible the system shall at least be able to help determine potential cause(s) a-posterori, identify responsible parties and make them accountable for their behavior. Recently, several algorithms addressing these concepts have been proposed. However, the applicability of the corresponding approaches, specifically their effectiveness and performance, is mostly unknown. Therefore, in this paper, we propose ACCBench, a benchmark tool that allows to compare and evaluate causality algorithms under a consistent setting. Furthermore, we contribute an implementation of the two causality algorithms by Gößler and Metayer and Gößler and Astefanoaei as well as of a policy compliance approach based on some concepts of Main et al. Lastly, we conduct a case study of an Intelligent Door Control System, which exposes concrete strengths and weaknesses of all algorithms under different aspects. In the course of this, we show that the effectiveness of the algorithms in terms of cause detection as well as their performance differ to some extent. In addition, our analysis reports on some qualitative aspects that should be considered when evaluating each algorithm. For example, the human effort needed to configure the algorithm and model the use case is analyzed.
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    Distributed storage systems suffer from significant repair traffic generated due to frequent storage node failures. This paper shows that properly designed low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes can substantially reduce the amount of required block downloads for repair thanks to the sparse nature of their factor graph representation. In particular, with a careful construction of the factor graph, both low repair-bandwidth and high reliability can be achieved for a given code rate. First, a formula for the average repair bandwidth of LDPC codes is developed. This formula is then used to establish that the minimum repair bandwidth can be achieved by forcing a regular check node degree in the factor graph. Moreover, it is shown that given a fixed code rate, the variable node degree should also be regular to yield minimum repair bandwidth, under some reasonable minimum variable node degree constraint. It is also shown that for a given repair-bandwidth requirement, LDPC codes can yield substantially higher reliability than currently utilized Reed-Solomon (RS) codes. Our reliability analysis is based on a formulation of the general equation for the mean-time-to-data-loss (MTTDL) associated with LDPC codes. The formulation reveals that the stopping number is closely related to the MTTDL. It is further shown that LDPC codes can be designed such that a small loss of repair-bandwidth optimality may be traded for a large improvement in erasure-correction capability and thus the MTTDL.