Other Computer Science (cs.OH)

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    A new trend in medicine is the use of algorithms to analyze big datasets, e.g. using everything your phone measures about you for diagnostics or monitoring. However, these algorithms are commonly compared against weak baselines, which may contribute to excessive optimism. To assess how well an algorithm works, scientists typically ask how well its output correlates with medically assigned scores. Here we perform a meta-analysis to quantify how the literature evaluates their algorithms for monitoring mental wellbeing. We find that the bulk of the literature ($\sim$77%) uses meaningless comparisons that ignore patient baseline state. For example, having an algorithm that uses phone data to diagnose mood disorders would be useful. However, it is possible to over 80% of the variance of some mood measures in the population by simply guessing that each patient has their own average mood - the patient-specific baseline. Thus, an algorithm that just predicts that our mood is like it usually is can explain the majority of variance, but is, obviously, entirely useless. Comparing to the wrong (population) baseline has a massive effect on the perceived quality of algorithms and produces baseless optimism in the field. To solve this problem we propose "user lift" that reduces these systematic errors in the evaluation of personalized medical monitoring.
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    It is generally accepted that machines can replicate cognitive tasks performed by conscious agents as long as they are not based on the capacity of awareness. We consider several views on the nature of subjective awareness, which is fundamental for self-reflection and review, and present reasons why this property is not computable. We argue that consciousness is more than an epiphenomenon and assuming it to be a separate category is consistent with both quantum mechanics and cognitive science. We speak of two kinds of consciousness, little-C and big-C, and discuss the significance of this classification in analyzing the current academic debates in the field. The interaction between the system and the measuring apparatus of the experimenter is examined both from the perspectives of decoherence and the quantum Zeno effect. These ideas are used as context to address the question of limits to machine consciousness.