Neural and Evolutionary Computing (cs.NE)

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    While the optimization problem behind deep neural networks is highly non-convex, it is frequently observed in practice that training deep networks seems possible without getting stuck in suboptimal points. It has been argued that this is the case as all local minima are close to being globally optimal. We show that this is (almost) true, in fact almost all local minima are globally optimal, for a fully connected network with squared loss and analytic activation function given that the number of hidden units of one layer of the network is larger than the number of training points and the network structure from this layer on is pyramidal.
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    We introduce an attention-based Bi-LSTM for Chinese implicit discourse relations and demonstrate that modeling argument pairs as a joint sequence can outperform word order-agnostic approaches. Our model benefits from a partial sampling scheme and is conceptually simple, yet achieves state-of-the-art performance on the Chinese Discourse Treebank. We also visualize its attention activity to illustrate the model's ability to selectively focus on the relevant parts of an input sequence.
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    As part of a complete software stack for autonomous driving, NVIDIA has created a neural-network-based system, known as PilotNet, which outputs steering angles given images of the road ahead. PilotNet is trained using road images paired with the steering angles generated by a human driving a data-collection car. It derives the necessary domain knowledge by observing human drivers. This eliminates the need for human engineers to anticipate what is important in an image and foresee all the necessary rules for safe driving. Road tests demonstrated that PilotNet can successfully perform lane keeping in a wide variety of driving conditions, regardless of whether lane markings are present or not. The goal of the work described here is to explain what PilotNet learns and how it makes its decisions. To this end we developed a method for determining which elements in the road image most influence PilotNet's steering decision. Results show that PilotNet indeed learns to recognize relevant objects on the road. In addition to learning the obvious features such as lane markings, edges of roads, and other cars, PilotNet learns more subtle features that would be hard to anticipate and program by engineers, for example, bushes lining the edge of the road and atypical vehicle classes.

Recent comments

Noon van der Silk Apr 06 2017 07:23 UTC

This is interesting work.

Did the authors happen to make their code available? I think there might be a few other fun experiments to run, and in particular I'd be interested to know how to use this framework for picking a network that does best at _both_ tasks (from the experiments section). That

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