Neural and Evolutionary Computing (cs.NE)

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    To harness the complexity of their high-dimensional bodies during sensorimotor development, infants are guided by patterns of freezing and freeing of degrees of freedom. For instance, when learning to reach, infants free the degrees of freedom in their arm proximodistally, i.e. from joints that are closer to the body to those that are more distant. Here, we formulate and study computationally the hypothesis that such patterns can emerge spontaneously as the result of a family of stochastic optimization processes (evolution strategies with covariance-matrix adaptation), without an innate encoding of a maturational schedule. In particular, we present simulated experiments with an arm where a computational learner progressively acquires reaching skills through adaptive exploration, and we show that a proximodistal organization appears spontaneously, which we denote PDFF (ProximoDistal Freezing and Freeing of degrees of freedom). We also compare this emergent organization between different arm morphologies -- from human-like to quite unnatural ones -- to study the effect of different kinematic structures on the emergence of PDFF. Keywords: human motor learning; proximo-distal exploration; stochastic optimization; modelling; evolution strategies; cross-entropy methods; policy search; morphology.
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    Deep Learning (DL) aims at learning the \emphmeaningful representations. A meaningful representation refers to the one that gives rise to significant performance improvement of associated Machine Learning (ML) tasks by replacing the raw data as the input. However, optimal architecture design and model parameter estimation in DL algorithms are widely considered to be intractable. Evolutionary algorithms are much preferable for complex and non-convex problems due to its inherent characteristics of gradient-free and insensitivity to local optimum. In this paper, we propose a computationally economical algorithm for evolving \emphunsupervised deep neural networks to efficiently learn \emphmeaningful representations, which is very suitable in the current Big Data era where sufficient labeled data for training is often expensive to acquire. In the proposed algorithm, finding an appropriate architecture and the initialized parameter values for a ML task at hand is modeled by one computational efficient gene encoding approach, which is employed to effectively model the task with a large number of parameters. In addition, a local search strategy is incorporated to facilitate the exploitation search for further improving the performance. Furthermore, a small proportion labeled data is utilized during evolution search to guarantee the learnt representations to be meaningful. The performance of the proposed algorithm has been thoroughly investigated over classification tasks. Specifically, error classification rate on MNIST with $1.15\%$ is reached by the proposed algorithm consistently, which is a very promising result against state-of-the-art unsupervised DL algorithms.
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    Convolutional auto-encoders have shown their remarkable performance in stacking to deep convolutional neural networks for classifying image data during past several years. However, they are unable to construct the state-of-the-art convolutional neural networks due to their intrinsic architectures. In this regard, we propose a flexible convolutional auto-encoder by eliminating the constraints on the numbers of convolutional layers and pooling layers from the traditional convolutional auto-encoder. We also design an architecture discovery method by using particle swarm optimization, which is capable of automatically searching for the optimal architectures of the proposed flexible convolutional auto-encoder with much less computational resource and without any manual intervention. We use the designed architecture optimization algorithm to test the proposed flexible convolutional auto-encoder through utilizing one graphic processing unit card on four extensively used image classification datasets. Experimental results show that our work in this paper significantly outperform the peer competitors including the state-of-the-art algorithm.
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    Fully connected multilayer perceptrons are used for obtaining numerical solutions of partial differential equations in various dimensions. Independent variables are fed into the input layer, and the output is considered as solution's value. To train such a network one can use square of equation's residual as a cost function and minimize it with respect to weights by gradient descent. Following previously developed method, derivatives of the equation's residual along random directions in space of independent variables are also added to cost function. Similar procedure is known to produce nearly machine precision results using less than 8 grid points per dimension for 2D case. The same effect is observed here for higher dimensions: solutions are obtained on low density grids, but maintain their precision in the entire region. Boundary value problems for linear and nonlinear Poisson equations are solved inside 2, 3, 4, and 5 dimensional balls. Grids for linear cases have 40, 159, 512 and 1536 points and for nonlinear 64, 350, 1536 and 6528 points respectively. In all cases maximum error is less than $8.8\cdot10^{-6}$, and median error is less than $2.4\cdot10^{-6}$. Very weak grid requirements enable neural networks to obtain solution of 5D linear problem within 22 minutes, whereas projected solving time for finite differences on the same hardware is 50 minutes. Method is applied to second order equation, but requires little to none modifications to solve systems or higher order PDEs.
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    Many biological and cognitive systems do not operate deep within one or other regime of activity. Instead, they are poised at critical points located at transitions of their parameter space. The pervasiveness of criticality suggests that there may be general principles inducing this behaviour, yet there is no well-founded theory for understanding how criticality is found at a wide range of levels and contexts. In this paper we present a general adaptive mechanism that maintains an internal organizational structure in order to drive a system towards critical points while it interacts with different environments. We implement the mechanism in artificial embodied agents controlled by a neural network maintaining a correlation structure randomly sampled from an Ising model at critical temperature. Agents are evaluated in two classical reinforcement learning scenarios: the Mountain Car and the Acrobot double pendulum. In both cases the neural controller reaches a point of criticality, which coincides with a transition point between two regimes of the agent's behaviour. These results suggest that adaptation to criticality could be used as a general adaptive mechanism in some circumstances, providing an alternative explanation for the pervasive presence of criticality in biological and cognitive systems.

Recent comments

Noon van der Silk Apr 06 2017 07:23 UTC

This is interesting work.

Did the authors happen to make their code available? I think there might be a few other fun experiments to run, and in particular I'd be interested to know how to use this framework for picking a network that does best at _both_ tasks (from the experiments section). That

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