Numerical Analysis (cs.NA)

  • PDF
    We solve tensor balancing, rescaling an Nth order nonnegative tensor by multiplying (N - 1)th order N tensors so that every fiber sums to one. This generalizes a fundamental process of matrix balancing used to compare matrices in a wide range of applications from biology to economics. We present an efficient balancing algorithm with quadratic convergence using Newton's method and show in numerical experiments that the proposed algorithm is several orders of magnitude faster than existing ones. To theoretically prove the correctness of the algorithm, we model tensors as probability distributions in a statistical manifold and realize tensor balancing as projection onto a submanifold. The key to our algorithm is that the gradient of the manifold, used as a Jacobian matrix in Newton's method, can be analytically obtained using the Möbius inversion formula, the essential of combinatorial mathematics. Our model is not limited to tensor balancing but has a wide applicability as it includes various statistical and machine learning models such as weighted DAGs and Boltzmann machines.
  • PDF
    Many machine learning models are reformulated as optimization problems. Thus, it is important to solve a large-scale optimization problem in big data applications. Recently, subsampled Newton methods have emerged to attract much attention for optimization due to their efficiency at each iteration, rectified a weakness in the ordinary Newton method of suffering a high cost in each iteration while commanding a high convergence rate. Other efficient stochastic second order methods are also proposed. However, the convergence properties of these methods are still not well understood. There are also several important gaps between the current convergence theory and the performance in real applications. In this paper, we aim to fill these gaps. We propose a unifying framework to analyze local convergence properties of second order methods. Based on this framework, our theoretical analysis matches the performance in real applications.
  • PDF
    We develop and analyze efficient "coordinate-wise" methods for finding the leading eigenvector, where each step involves only a vector-vector product. We establish global convergence with overall runtime guarantees that are at least as good as Lanczos's method and dominate it for slowly decaying spectrum. Our methods are based on combining a shift-and-invert approach with coordinate-wise algorithms for linear regression.