Multiagent Systems (cs.MA)

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    We present an approach for implementing a specific form of collaborative industrial practices-called Industrial Symbiotic Networks (ISNs)-as MC-Net cooperative games and address the so called ISN implementation problem. This is, the characteristics of ISNs may lead to inapplicability of fair and stable benefit allocation methods even if the collaboration is a collectively desired one. Inspired by realistic ISN scenarios and the literature on normative multi-agent systems, we consider regulations and normative socioeconomic policies as two elements that in combination with ISN games resolve the situation and result in the concept of coordinated ISNs.
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    Interest in emergent communication has recently surged in Machine Learning. The focus of this interest has largely been either on investigating the properties of the learned protocol or on utilizing emergent communication to better solve problems that already have a viable solution. Here, we consider self-driving cars coordinating with each other and focus on how communication influences the agents' collective behavior. Our main result is that communication helps (most) with adverse conditions.
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    Queen Daniela of Sardinia is asleep at the center of a round room at the top of the tower in her castle. She is accompanied by her faithful servant, Eva. Suddenly, they are awakened by cries of "Fire". The room is pitch black and they are disoriented. There is exactly one exit from the room somewhere along its boundary. They must find it as quickly as possible in order to save the life of the queen. It is known that with two people searching while moving at maximum speed 1 anywhere in the room, the room can be evacuated (i.e., with both people exiting) in $1 + \frac{2\pi}{3} + \sqrt{3} \approx 4.8264$ time units and this is optimal~[Czyzowicz et al., DISC'14], assuming that the first person to find the exit can directly guide the other person to the exit using her voice. Somewhat surprisingly, in this paper we show that if the goal is to save the queen (possibly leaving Eva behind to die in the fire) there is a slightly better strategy. We prove that this "priority" version of evacuation can be solved in time at most $4.81854$. Furthermore, we show that any strategy for saving the queen requires time at least $3 + \pi/6 + \sqrt{3}/2 \approx 4.3896$ in the worst case. If one or both of the queen's other servants (Biddy and/or Lili) are with her, we show that the time bounds can be improved to $3.8327$ for two servants, and $3.3738$ for three servants. Finally we show lower bounds for these cases of $3.6307$ (two servants) and $3.2017$ (three servants). The case of $n\geq 4$ is the subject of an independent study by Queen Daniela's Royal Scientific Team.
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    In the parable of Simon's Ant, an ant follows a complex path along a beach on to reach its goal. The story shows how the interaction of simple rules and a complex environment result in complex behavior. But this relationship can be looked at in another way - given path and rules, we can infer the environment. With a large population of agents - human or animal - it should be possible to build a detailed map of a population's social and physical environment. In this abstract, we describe the development of a framework to create such maps of human belief space. These maps are built from the combined trajectories of a large number of agents. Currently, these maps are built using multidimensional agent-based simulation, but the framework is designed to work using data from computer-mediated human communication. Maps incorporating human data should support visualization and navigation of the "plains of research", "fashionable foothills" and "conspiracy cliffs" of human belief spaces.
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    The spread of autonomous systems into safety-critical areas has increased the demand for their formal verification, not only due to stronger certification requirements but also to public uncertainty over these new technologies. However, the complex nature of such systems, for example, the intricate combination of discrete and continuous aspects, ensures that whole system verification is often infeasible. This motivates the need for novel analysis approaches that modularise the problem, allowing us to restrict our analysis to one particular aspect of the system while abstracting away from others. For instance, while verifying the real-time properties of an autonomous system we might hide the details of the internal decision-making components. In this paper we describe verification of a range of properties across distinct dimesnions on a practical hybrid agent architecture. This allows us to verify the autonomous decision-making, real-time aspects, and spatial aspects of an autonomous vehicle platooning system. This modular approach also illustrates how both algorithmic and deductive verification techniques can be applied for the analysis of different system subcomponents.
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    Making decisions is a great challenge in distributed autonomous environments due to enormous state spaces and uncertainty. Many online planning algorithms rely on statistical sampling to avoid searching the whole state space, while still being able to make acceptable decisions. However, planning often has to be performed under strict computational constraints making online planning in multi-agent systems highly limited, which could lead to poor system performance, especially in stochastic domains. In this paper, we propose Emergent Value function Approximation for Distributed Environments (EVADE), an approach to integrate global experience into multi-agent online planning in stochastic domains to consider global effects during local planning. For this purpose, a value function is approximated online based on the emergent system behaviour by using methods of reinforcement learning. We empirically evaluated EVADE with two statistical multi-agent online planning algorithms in a highly complex and stochastic smart factory environment, where multiple agents need to process various items at a shared set of machines. Our experiments show that EVADE can effectively improve the performance of multi-agent online planning while offering efficiency w.r.t. the breadth and depth of the planning process.
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    This chapter discusses the interplay between structure and dynamics in complex networks. Given a particular network with an endowed dynamics, our goal is to find partitions aligned with the dynamical process acting on top of the network. We thus aim to gain a reduced description of the system that takes into account both its structure and dynamics. In the first part, we introduce the general mathematical setup for the types of dynamics we consider throughout the chapter. We provide two guiding examples, namely consensus dynamics and diffusion processes (random walks), motivating their connection to social network analysis, and provide a brief discussion on the general dynamical framework and its possible extensions. In the second part, we focus on the influence of graph structure on the dynamics taking place on the network, focusing on three concepts that allow us to gain insight into this notion. First, we describe how time scale separation can appear in the dynamics on a network as a consequence of graph structure. Second, we discuss how the presence of particular symmetries in the network give rise to invariant dynamical subspaces that can be precisely described by graph partitions. Third, we show how this dynamical viewpoint can be extended to study dynamics on networks with signed edges, which allow us to discuss connections to concepts in social network analysis, such as structural balance. In the third part, we discuss how to use dynamical processes unfolding on the network to detect meaningful network substructures. We then show how such dynamical measures can be related to seemingly different algorithm for community detection and coarse-graining proposed in the literature. We conclude with a brief summary and highlight interesting open future directions.
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    With the emergence of autonomous vehicles, it is important to understand their impact on the transportation system. However, conventional traffic simulations are time-consuming. In this paper, we introduce an analytical traffic model for unmanaged intersections accounting for microscopic vehicle interactions. The macroscopic property, i.e., delay at the intersection, is modeled as an event-driven stochastic dynamic process, whose dynamics encode the microscopic vehicle behaviors. The distribution of macroscopic properties can be obtained through either direct analysis or event-driven simulation. They are more efficient than conventional (time-driven) traffic simulation, and capture more microscopic details compared to conventional macroscopic flow models. We illustrate the efficiency of this method by delay analyses under two different policies at a two-lane intersection. The proposed model allows for 1) efficient and effective comparison among different policies, 2) policy optimization, 3) traffic prediction, and 4) system optimization (e.g., infrastructure and protocol).

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