Multiagent Systems (cs.MA)

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    We present AutonoVi:, a novel algorithm for autonomous vehicle navigation that supports dynamic maneuvers and satisfies traffic constraints and norms. Our approach is based on optimization-based maneuver planning that supports dynamic lane-changes, swerving, and braking in all traffic scenarios and guides the vehicle to its goal position. We take into account various traffic constraints, including collision avoidance with other vehicles, pedestrians, and cyclists using control velocity obstacles. We use a data-driven approach to model the vehicle dynamics for control and collision avoidance. Furthermore, our trajectory computation algorithm takes into account traffic rules and behaviors, such as stopping at intersections and stoplights, based on an arc-spline representation. We have evaluated our algorithm in a simulated environment and tested its interactive performance in urban and highway driving scenarios with tens of vehicles, pedestrians, and cyclists. These scenarios include jaywalking pedestrians, sudden stops from high speeds, safely passing cyclists, a vehicle suddenly swerving into the roadway, and high-density traffic where the vehicle must change lanes to progress more effectively.
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    Norms have been extensively proposed as coordination mechanisms for both agent and human societies. Nevertheless, choosing the norms to regulate a society is by no means straightforward. The reasons are twofold. First, the norms to choose from may not be independent (i.e, they can be related to each other). Second, different preference criteria may be applied when choosing the norms to enact. This paper advances the state of the art by modeling a series of decision-making problems that regulation authorities confront when choosing the policies to establish. In order to do so, we first identify three different norm relationships -namely, generalisation, exclusivity, and substitutability- and we then consider norm representation power, cost, and associated moral values as alternative preference criteria. Thereafter, we show that the decision-making problems faced by policy makers can be encoded as linear programs, and hence solved with the aid of state-of-the-art solvers.
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    An event-based state estimation approach for reducing communication in a networked control system is proposed. Multiple distributed sensor agents observe a dynamic process and sporadically transmit their measurements to estimator agents over a shared bus network. Local event-triggering protocols ensure that data is transmitted only when necessary to meet a desired estimation accuracy. The event-based design is shown to emulate the performance of a centralised state observer design up to guaranteed bounds, but with reduced communication. The stability results for state estimation are extended to the distributed control system that results when the local estimates are used for feedback control. Results from numerical simulations and hardware experiments illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach in reducing network communication.
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    This thesis is in the area called computational social choice which is an intersection area of algorithms and social choice theory.
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    Motivated by economic dispatch and linearly-constrained resource allocation problems, this paper proposes a novel Distributed Approx-Newton algorithm that approximates the standard Newton optimization method. A main property of this distributed algorithm is that it only requires agents to exchange constant-size communication messages. The convergence of this algorithm is discussed and rigorously analyzed. In addition, we aim to address the problem of designing communication topologies and weightings that are optimal for second-order methods. To this end, we propose an effective approximation which is loosely based on completing the square to address the NP-hard bilinear optimization involved in the design. Simulations demonstrate that our proposed weight design applied to the Distributed Approx-Newton algorithm has a superior convergence property compared to existing weighted and distributed first-order gradient descent methods.
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    We consider the problem of controlling the spatiotemporal probability distribution of a robotic swarm that evolves according to a reflected diffusion process, using the space- and time-dependent drift vector field parameter as the control variable. In contrast to previous work on control of the Fokker-Planck equation, a zero-flux boundary condition is imposed on the partial differential equation that governs the swarm probability distribution, and only bounded vector fields are considered to be admissible as control parameters. Under these constraints, we show that any initial probability distribution can be transported to a target probability distribution under certain assumptions on the regularity of the target distribution. In particular, we show that if the target distribution is (essentially) bounded, has bounded first-order and second-order partial derivatives, and is bounded from below by a strictly positive constant, then this distribution can be reached exactly using a drift vector field that is bounded in space and time. Our proof is constructive and based on classical linear semigroup theoretic concepts.
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    In this paper, we focus on applications in machine learning, optimization, and control that call for the resilient selection of a few elements, e.g. features, sensors, or leaders, against a number of adversarial denial-of-service attacks or failures. In general, such resilient optimization problems are hard, and cannot be solved exactly in polynomial time, even though they often involve objective functions that are monotone and submodular. Notwithstanding, in this paper we provide the first scalable, curvature-dependent algorithm for their approximate solution, that is valid for any number of attacks or failures, and which, for functions with low curvature, guarantees superior approximation performance. Notably, the curvature has been known to tighten approximations for several non-resilient maximization problems, yet its effect on resilient maximization had hitherto been unknown. We complement our theoretical analyses with supporting empirical evaluations.