Multiagent Systems (cs.MA)

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    Agent-based IoT applications have recently been proposed in several domains, such as health care, smart cities and agriculture. Deploying these applications in specific settings has been very challenging for many reasons including the complex static and dynamic variability of the physical devices such as sensors and actuators, the software application behavior and the environment in which the application is embedded. In this paper, we propose a self-configurable IoT agent approach based on feedback-evaluative machine-learning. The approach involves: i) a variability model of IoT agents; ii) generation of sets of customized agents; iii) feedback evaluative machine learning; iv) modeling and composition of a group of IoT agents; and v) a feature-selection method based on manual and automatic feedback.
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    The cornerstone underpinning deep learning is the guarantee that gradient descent on an objective converges to local minima. Unfortunately, this guarantee fails in settings, such as generative adversarial nets, where there are multiple interacting losses. The behavior of gradient-based methods in games is not well understood -- and is becoming increasingly important as adversarial and multi-objective architectures proliferate. In this paper, we develop new techniques to understand and control the dynamics in general games. The key result is to decompose the second-order dynamics into two components. The first is related to potential games, which reduce to gradient descent on an implicit function; the second relates to Hamiltonian games, a new class of games that obey a conservation law, akin to conservation laws in classical mechanical systems. The decomposition motivates Symplectic Gradient Adjustment (SGA), a new algorithm for finding stable fixed points in general games. Basic experiments show SGA is competitive with recently proposed algorithms for finding local Nash equilibria in GANs -- whilst at the same time being applicable to -- and having guarantees in -- much more general games.
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    Existing multi-agent reinforcement learning methods are limited typically to a small number of agents. When the agent number increases largely, the learning becomes intractable due to the curse of the dimensionality and the exponential growth of user interactions. In this paper, we present Mean Field Reinforcement Learning where the interactions within the population of agents are approximated by those between a single agent and the average effect from the overall population or neighboring agents; the interplay between the two entities is mutually reinforced: the learning of the individual agent's optimal policy depends on the dynamics of the population, while the dynamics of the population change according to the collective patterns of the individual policies. We develop practical mean field Q-learning and mean field Actor-Critic algorithms and analyze the convergence of the solution. Experiments on resource allocation, Ising model estimation, and battle game tasks verify the learning effectiveness of our mean field approaches in handling many-agent interactions in population.
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    Given a large number of homogeneous players that are distributed across three possible states, we consider the problem in which these players have to control their transition rates, while minimizing a cost. The optimal transition rates are based on the players' knowledge of their current state and of the distribution of all the other players, and this introduces mean-field terms in the running and the terminal cost. The first contribution involves a mean-field game model that brings together macroscopic and microscopic dynamics. We obtain the mean-field equilibrium associated with this model, by solving the corresponding initial-terminal value problem. We perform an asymptotic analysis to obtain a stationary equilibrium for the system. The second contribution involves the study of the microscopic dynamics of the system for a finite number of players that interact in a structured environment modeled by an interaction topology. The third contribution is the specialization of the model to describe honeybee swarms, virus propagation, and cascading failures in interconnected smart-grids. A numerical analysis is conducted which involves two types of cyber-attacks. We simulate in which ways failures propagate across the interconnected smart grids and the impact on the grids frequencies. We reframe our analysis within the context of Lyapunov's linearisation method and stability theory of nonlinear systems and Kuramoto coupled oscillators model.
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    Multiple studies have illustrated the potential for dramatic societal, environmental and economic benefits from significant penetration of autonomous driving. However, all the current approaches to autonomous driving require the automotive manufacturers to shoulder the primary responsibility and liability associated with replacing human perception and decision making with automation, potentially slowing the penetration of autonomous vehicles, and consequently slowing the realization of the societal benefits of autonomous vehicles. We propose here a new approach to autonomous driving that will re-balance the responsibility and liabilities associated with autonomous driving between traditional automotive manufacturers, infrastructure players, and third-party players. Our proposed distributed intelligence architecture leverages the significant advancements in connectivity and edge computing in the recent decades to partition the driving functions between the vehicle, edge computers on the road side, and specialized third-party computers that reside in the vehicle. Infrastructure becomes a critical enabler for autonomy. With this Infrastructure Enabled Autonomy (IEA) concept, the traditional automotive manufacturers will only need to shoulder responsibility and liability comparable to what they already do today, and the infrastructure and third-party players will share the added responsibility and liabilities associated with autonomous functionalities. We propose a Bayesian Network Model based framework for assessing the risk benefits of such a distributed intelligence architecture. An additional benefit of the proposed architecture is that it enables "autonomy as a service" while still allowing for private ownership of automobiles.

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