Multiagent Systems (cs.MA)

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    Before reaching full autonomy, vehicles will gradually be equipped with more and more advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS), effectively rendering them semi-autonomous. However, current ADAS technologies seem unable to handle complex traffic situations, notably when dealing with vehicles arriving from the sides, either at intersections or when merging on highways. The high rate of accidents in these settings prove that they constitute difficult driving situations. Moreover, intersections and merging lanes are often the source of important traffic congestion and, sometimes, deadlocks. In this article, we propose a cooperative framework to safely coordinate semi-autonomous vehicles in such settings, removing the risk of collision or deadlocks while remaining compatible with human driving. More specifically, we present a supervised coordination scheme that overrides control inputs from human drivers when they would result in an unsafe or blocked situation. To avoid unnecessary intervention and remain compatible with human driving, overriding only occurs when collisions or deadlocks are imminent. In this case, safe overriding controls are chosen while ensuring they deviate minimally from those originally requested by the drivers. Simulation results based on a realistic physics simulator show that our approach is scalable to real-world scenarios, and computations can be performed in real-time on a standard computer for up to a dozen simultaneous vehicles.
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    Blackboard systems are motivated by the popular view of task forces as brainstorming groups in which specialists write promising ideas to solve a problem in a central blackboard. Here we study a minimal model of blackboard system designed to solve cryptarithmetic puzzles, where hints are posted anonymously on a public display (standard blackboard) or are posted together with information about the reputations of the agents that posted them (reputation blackboard). We find that the reputation blackboard always outperforms the standard blackboard, which, in turn, always outperforms the independent search. The asymptotic distribution of the computational cost of the search, which is proportional to the total number of agent updates required to find the solution of the puzzle, is an exponential distribution for those three search heuristics. Only for the reputation blackboard we find a nontrivial dependence of the mean computational cost on the system size and, in that case, the optimal performance is achieved by a single agent working alone, indicating that, though the blackboard organization can produce impressive performance gains when compared with the independent search, it is not very supportive of cooperative work.
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    We summarise the results of RoboCup 2D Soccer Simulation League in 2016 (Leipzig), including the main competition and the evaluation round. The evaluation round held in Leipzig confirmed the strength of RoboCup-2015 champion (WrightEagle, i.e. WE2015) in the League, with only eventual finalists of 2016 competition capable of defeating WE2015. An extended, post-Leipzig, round-robin tournament which included the top 8 teams of 2016, as well as WE2015, with over 1000 games played for each pair, placed WE2015 third behind the champion team (Gliders2016) and the runner-up (HELIOS2016). This establishes WE2015 as a stable benchmark for the 2D Simulation League. We then contrast two ranking methods and suggest two options for future evaluation challenges. The first one, "The Champions Simulation League", is proposed to include 6 previous champions, directly competing against each other in a round-robin tournament, with the view to systematically trace the advancements in the League. The second proposal, "The Global Challenge", is aimed to increase the realism of the environmental conditions during the simulated games, by simulating specific features of different participating countries.
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    In the context of solving large distributed constraint optimization problems (DCOP), belief-propagation and approximate inference algorithms are candidates of choice. However, in general, when the factor graph is very loopy (i.e. cyclic), these solution methods suffer from bad performance, due to non-convergence and many exchanged messages. As to improve performances of the Max-Sum inference algorithm when solving loopy constraint optimization problems, we propose here to take inspiration from the belief-propagation-guided dec-imation used to solve sparse random graphs (k-satisfiability). We propose the novel DeciMaxSum method, which is parameterized in terms of policies to decide when to trigger decimation, which variables to decimate, and which values to assign to decimated variables. Based on an empirical evaluation on a classical BP benchmark (the Ising model), some of these combinations of policies exhibit better performance than state-of-the-art competitors.
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    In this paper, we address the problem of controlling a network of mobile sensors so that a set of hidden states are estimated up to a user-specified accuracy. The sensors take measurements and fuse them online using an Information Consensus Filter (ICF). At the same time, the local estimates guide the sensors to their next best configuration. This leads to an LMI-constrained optimization problem that we solve by means of a new distributed random approximate projections method. The new method is robust to the state disagreement errors that exist among the robots as the ICF fuses the collected measurements. Assuming that the noise corrupting the measurements is zero-mean and Gaussian and that the robots are self localized in the environment, the integrated system converges to the next best positions from where new observations will be taken. This process is repeated with the robots taking a sequence of observations until the hidden states are estimated up to the desired user-specified accuracy. We present simulations of sparse landmark localization, where the robotic team achieves the desired estimation tolerances while exhibiting interesting emergent behavior.
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    We present a real-time algorithm, SocioSense, for socially-aware navigation of a robot amongst pedestrians. Our approach computes time-varying behaviors of each pedestrian using Bayesian learning and Personality Trait theory. These psychological characteristics are used for long-term path prediction and generating proximic characteristics for each pedestrian. We combine these psychological constraints with social constraints to perform human-aware robot navigation in low- to medium-density crowds. The estimation of time-varying behaviors and pedestrian personalities can improve the performance of long-term path prediction by 21%, as compared to prior interactive path prediction algorithms. We also demonstrate the benefits of our socially-aware navigation in simulated environments with tens of pedestrians.
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    The efficient use of available resources is a key factor in achieving success on both personal and organizational levels. One of the crucial resources in knowledge economy is time. The ability to force others to adapt to our schedule even if it harms their efficiency can be seen as an outcome of social stratification. The principal objective of this paper is to use time allocation to model and study the global efficiency of social stratification, and to reveal whether hierarchy is an emergent property. A multi-agent model with an evolving social network is used to verify our hypotheses. The network's evolution is driven by the intensity of inter-agent communications, and the communications as such depend on the preferences and time resources of the communicating agents. The entire system is to be perceived as a metaphor of a social network of people regularly filling out agenda for their meetings for a period of time. The overall efficiency of the network of those scheduling agents is measured by the average utilization of the agent's preferences to speak on specific subjects. The simulation results shed light on the effects of different scheduling methods, resource availabilities, and network evolution mechanisms on communication system efficiency. The non-stratified systems show better long-term efficiency. Moreover, in the long term hierarchy disappears in overwhelming majority of cases. Some exceptions are observed for cases where privileges are granted on the basis of node degree weighted by relationship intensities but only in the short term.
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    In this paper, we develop a distributed intermittent communication and task planning framework for teams of mobile robots. The goal of the robots is to accomplish complex tasks, captured by local Linear Temporal Logic formulas, and share the collected information with all other robots and possibly also with a user. Specifically, we consider situations where the robot communication capabilities are not sufficient to form reliable and connected networks while the robots move to accomplish their tasks. In this case, intermittent communication protocols are necessary that allow the robots to temporarily disconnect from the network in order to accomplish their tasks free of communication constraints. We assume that the robots can only communicate with each other when they meet at common locations in space. Our distributed control framework jointly determines local plans that allow all robots fulfill their assigned temporal tasks, sequences of communication events that guarantee information exchange infinitely often, and optimal communication locations that minimize the total distance traveled by the robots. Simulation and experimental results verify the efficacy of the proposed distributed controllers.
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    We consider the following control problem on fair allocation of indivisible goods. Given a set $I$ of items and a set of agents, each having strict linear preference over the items, we ask for a minimum subset of the items whose deletion guarantees the existence of a proportional allocation in the remaining instance; we call this problem Proportionality by Item Deletion (PID). Our main result is a polynomial-time algorithm that solves PID for three agents. By contrast, we prove that PID is computationally intractable when the number of agents is unbounded, even if the number $k$ of item deletions allowed is small, since the problem turns out to be W[3]-hard with respect to the parameter $k$. Additionally, we provide some tight lower and upper bounds on the complexity of PID when regarded as a function of $|I|$ and $k$.
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    The multi-agent path-finding (MAPF) problem has recently received a lot of attention. However, it does not capture important characteristics of many real-world domains, such as automated warehouses, where agents are constantly engaged with new tasks. In this paper, we therefore study a lifelong version of the MAPF problem, called the multi-agent pickup and delivery (MAPD) problem. In the MAPD problem, agents have to attend to a stream of delivery tasks in an online setting. One agent has to be assigned to each delivery task. This agent has to first move to a given pickup location and then to a given delivery location while avoiding collisions with other agents. We present two decoupled MAPD algorithms, Token Passing (TP) and Token Passing with Task Swaps (TPTS). Theoretically, we show that they solve all well-formed MAPD instances, a realistic subclass of MAPD instances. Experimentally, we compare them against a centralized strawman MAPD algorithm without this guarantee in a simulated warehouse system. TP can easily be extended to a fully distributed MAPD algorithm and is the best choice when real-time computation is of primary concern since it remains efficient for MAPD instances with hundreds of agents and tasks. TPTS requires limited communication among agents and balances well between TP and the centralized MAPD algorithm.
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    Inspired by previous work on emergent language in referential games, we propose a novel multi-modal, multi-step referential game, where the sender and receiver have access to distinct modalities of an object, and their information exchange is bidirectional and of arbitrary duration. The multi-modal multi-step setting allows agents to develop an internal language significantly closer to natural language, in that they share a single set of messages, and that the length of the conversation may vary according to the difficulty of the task. We examine these properties empirically using a dataset consisting of images and textual descriptions of mammals, where the agents are tasked with identifying the correct object. Our experiments indicate that a robust and efficient communication protocol emerges, where gradual information exchange informs better predictions and higher communication bandwidth improves generalization.
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    Society has become more dependent on automated intelligent systems, at the same time, these systems have become more and more complicated. Society's expectation regarding the capabilities and intelligence of such systems has also grown. We have become a more complicated society with more complicated problems. As the expectation of intelligent systems rises, we discover many more applications for artificial intelligence. Additionally, as the difficulty level and computational requirements of such problems rise, there is a need to distribute the problem solving. Although the field of multiagent systems (MAS) and distributed artificial intelligence (DAI) is relatively young, the importance and applicability of this technology for solving today's problems continue to grow. In multiagent systems, the main goal is to provide fruitful cooperation among agents in order to enrich the support given to all user activities. This paper deals with the development of a multiagent system aimed at solving the reservation problems encountered in rural tourism. Due to their benefits over the last few years, online travel agencies have become a very useful instrument in planning vacations. A MAS concept (which is based on the Internet exploitation) can improve this activity and provide clients with a new, rapid and efficient way of making accommodation arrangements.
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    The existence of a coalition strategy to achieve a goal does not necessarily mean that the coalition has enough information to know how to follow the strategy. Neither does it mean that the coalition knows that such a strategy exists. The article studies an interplay between the distributed knowledge, coalition strategies, and coalition "know-how" strategies. The main technical result is a sound and complete trimodal logical system that describes the properties of this interplay.
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    Hedonic games are meant to model how coalitions of people form and break apart in the real world. However, it is difficult to run simulations when everything must be done by hand on paper. We present an online software that allows fast and visual simulation of several types hedonic games.
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    We study pure coordination games where in every outcome, all players have identical payoffs, 'win' or 'lose'. We identify and discuss a range of 'purely rational principles' guiding the reasoning of rational players in such games and analyze which classes of coordination games can be solved by such players with no preplay communication or conventions. We observe that it is highly nontrivial to delineate a boundary between purely rational principles and other decision methods, such as conventions, for solving such coordination games.
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    We investigate large-scale effects induced by external fields, phenomenologically interpreted as mass media, in multi-agent models evolving with the microscopic dynamics of the binary Naming Game. In particular we show that a single external field, broadcasting information at regular time intervals, can reverse the majority opinion of the population, provided the frequency and the effectiveness of the sent messages lie above well-defined thresholds. We study the phase structure of the model in the mean field approximation and in numerical simulations with several network topologies. We also investigate the influence on the agent dynamics of two competing external fields, periodically broadcasting different messages. In finite regions of the parameter space we observe periodic equilibrium states in which the average opinion densities are reversed with respect to naive expectations. Such equilibria occur in two cases: i) when the frequencies of the competing messages are different but close to each other; ii) when the frequencies are equal and the relative time shift of the messages does not exceed half a period. We interpret the observed phenomena as a result of the interplay between the external fields and the internal dynamics of the agents and conclude that, depending on the model parameters, the Naming Game is consistent with scenarios of first- or second-mover advantage (to borrow an expression from the jargon of business strategy).
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    There is a paradox in the model of social dynamics determined by voting in a stochastic environment (the ViSE model) called "pit of losses." It consists in the fact that a series of democratic decisions may systematically lead the society to the states unacceptable for all the voters. The paper examines how this paradox can be neutralized by the presence in society of a group that votes for its benefit and can regulate the threshold of its claims. We obtain and analyze analytical results characterizing the welfare of the whole society, the group, and the other participants as functions of the said claims threshold.
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    In this paper, we develop a class of decentralized algorithms for solving a convex resource allocation problem in a network of $n$ agents, where the agent objectives are decoupled while the resource constraints are coupled. The agents communicate over a connected undirected graph, and they want to collaboratively determine a solution to the overall network problem, while each agent only communicates with its neighbors. We first study the connection between the decentralized resource allocation problem and the decentralized consensus optimization problem. Then, using a class of algorithms for solving consensus optimization problems, we propose a novel class of decentralized schemes for solving resource allocation problems in a distributed manner. Specifically, we first propose an algorithm for solving the resource allocation problem with an $o(1/k)$ convergence rate guarantee when the agents' objective functions are generally convex (could be nondifferentiable) and per agent local convex constraints are allowed; We then propose a gradient-based algorithm for solving the resource allocation problem when per agent local constraints are absent and show that such scheme can achieve geometric rate when the objective functions are strongly convex and have Lipschitz continuous gradients. We have also provided scalability/network dependency analysis. Based on these two algorithms, we have further proposed a gradient projection-based algorithm which can handle smooth objective and simple constraints more efficiently. Numerical experiments demonstrates the viability and performance of all the proposed algorithms.
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    In horizontal collaborations, carriers form coalitions in order to perform parts of their logistics operations jointly. By exchanging transportation requests among each other, they can operate more efficiently and in a more sustainable way. Collaborative vehicle routing has been extensively discussed in the literature. We identify three major streams of research: (i) centralized collaborative planning, (ii) decentralized planning without auctions, and (ii) auction-based decentralized planning. For each of them we give a structured overview on the state of knowledge and discuss future research directions.
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    We consider the framework of average aggregative games, where the cost function of each agent depends on his own strategy and on the average population strategy. We focus on the case in which the agents are coupled not only via their cost functions, but also via affine constraints on the average of the agents' strategies. We propose a distributed algorithm that achieves an almost Nash equilibrium by requiring only local communications of the agents, as specified by a sparse communication network. The proof of convergence of the algorithm relies on the auxiliary class of network aggregative games and exploits a novel result of parametric convergence of variational inequalities, which is applicable beyond the context of games. We apply our theoretical findings to a multi-market Cournot game with transportation costs and maximum market capacity.
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    We consider a team of heterogeneous robots which are deployed within a common workspace to gather different types of data. The robots have different roles due to different capabilities: some gather data from the workspace (source robots) and others receive data from source robots and upload them to a data center (relay robots). The data-gathering tasks are specified locally to each source robot as high-level Linear Temporal Logic (LTL) formulas, that capture the different types of data that need to be gathered at different regions of interest. All robots have a limited buffer to store the data. Thus the data gathered by source robots should be transferred to relay robots before their buffers overflow, respecting at the same time limited communication range for all robots. The main contribution of this work is a distributed motion coordination and intermittent communication scheme that guarantees the satisfaction of all local tasks, while obeying the above constraints. The robot motion and inter-robot communication are closely coupled and coordinated during run time by scheduling intermittent meeting events to facilitate the local plan execution. We present both numerical simulations and experimental studies to demonstrate the advantages of the proposed method over existing approaches that predominantly require all-time network connectivity.
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    This paper addresses active state estimation with a team of robotic sensors. The states to be estimated are represented by spatially distributed, uncorrelated, stationary vectors. Given a prior belief on the geographic locations of the states, we cluster the states in moderately sized groups and propose a new hierarchical Dynamic Programming (DP) framework to compute optimal sensing policies for each cluster that mitigates the computational cost of planning optimal policies in the combined belief space. Then, we develop a decentralized assignment algorithm that dynamically allocates clusters to robots based on the pre-computed optimal policies at each cluster. The integrated distributed state estimation framework is optimal at the cluster level but also scales very well to large numbers of states and robot sensors. We demonstrate efficiency of the proposed method in both simulations and real-world experiments using stereoscopic vision sensors.
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    Recent work has considered theoretical models for the behavior of agents with specific behavioral biases: rather than making decisions that optimize a given payoff function, the agent behaves inefficiently because its decisions suffer from an underlying bias. These approaches have generally considered an agent who experiences a single behavioral bias, studying the effect of this bias on the outcome. In general, however, decision-making can and will be affected by multiple biases operating at the same time. How do multiple biases interact to produce the overall outcome? Here we consider decisions in the presence of a pair of biases exhibiting an intuitively natural interaction: present bias -- the tendency to value costs incurred in the present too highly -- and sunk-cost bias -- the tendency to incorporate costs experienced in the past into one's plans for the future. We propose a theoretical model for planning with this pair of biases, and we show how certain natural behavioral phenomena can arise in our model only when agents exhibit both biases. As part of our model we differentiate between agents that are aware of their biases (sophisticated) and agents that are unaware of them (naive). Interestingly, we show that the interaction between the two biases is quite complex: in some cases, they mitigate each other's effects while in other cases they might amplify each other. We obtain a number of further results as well, including the fact that the planning problem in our model for an agent experiencing and aware of both biases is computationally hard in general, though tractable under more relaxed assumptions.
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    Learning to communicate through interaction, rather than relying on explicit supervision, is often considered a prerequisite for developing a general AI. We study a setting where two agents engage in playing a referential game and, from scratch, develop a communication protocol necessary to succeed in this game. Unlike previous work, we require that messages they exchange, both at train and test time, are in the form of a language (i.e. sequences of discrete symbols). We compare a reinforcement learning approach and one using a differentiable relaxation (straight-through Gumbel-softmax estimator) and observe that the latter is much faster to converge and it results in more effective protocols. Interestingly, we also observe that the protocol we induce by optimizing the communication success exhibits a degree of compositionality and variability (i.e. the same information can be phrased in different ways), both properties characteristic of natural languages. As the ultimate goal is to ensure that communication is accomplished in natural language, we also perform experiments where we inject prior information about natural language into our model and study properties of the resulting protocol.
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    In future intelligent transportation systems, networked vehicles coordinate with each other to achieve safe operations based on an assumption that communications among vehicles and infrastructure are reliable. Traditional methods usually deal with the design of control systems and communication networks in a separated manner. However, control and communication systems are tightly coupled as the motions of vehicles will affect the overall communication quality. Hence, we are motivated to study the co-design of both control and communication systems. In particular, we propose a control theoretical framework for distributed motion planning for multi-agent systems which satisfies complex and high-level spatial and temporal specifications while accounting for communication quality at the same time. Towards this end, desired motion specifications and communication performances are formulated as signal temporal logic (STL) and spatial-temporal logic (SpaTeL) formulas, respectively. The specifications are encoded as constraints on system and environment state variables of mixed integer linear programs (MILP), and upon which control strategies satisfying both STL and SpaTeL specifications are generated for each agent by employing a distributed model predictive control (MPC) framework. Effectiveness of the proposed framework is validated by a simulation of distributed communication-aware motion planning for multi-agent systems.
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    The recently proposed DeGroot-Friedkin model describes the dynamical evolution of individual social power in a social network that holds opinion discussions on a sequence of different issues. This paper revisits that model, and uses nonlinear contraction analysis, among other tools, to establish several novel results. First, we show that for a social network with constant topology, each individual's social power converges to its equilibrium value exponentially fast, whereas previous results only concluded asymptotic convergence. Second, when the network topology is dynamic (i.e., the relative interaction matrix may change between any two successive issues), we show that each individual exponentially forgets its initial social power. Specifically, individual social power is dependent only on the dynamic network topology, and initial (or perceived) social power is forgotten as a result of sequential opinion discussion. Last, we provide an explicit upper bound on an individual's social power as the number of issues discussed tends to infinity; this bound depends only on the network topology. Simulations are provided to illustrate our results.