Multiagent Systems (cs.MA)

  • PDF
    Successful analysis of player skills in video games has important impacts on the process of enhancing player experience without undermining their continuous skill development. Moreover, player skill analysis becomes more intriguing in team-based video games because such form of study can help discover useful factors in effective team formation. In this paper, we consider the problem of skill decomposition in MOBA (MultiPlayer Online Battle Arena) games, with the goal to understand what player skill factors are essential for the outcome of a game match. To understand the construct of MOBA player skills, we utilize various skill-based predictive models to decompose player skills into interpretative parts, the impact of which are assessed in statistical terms. We apply this analysis approach on two widely known MOBAs, namely League of Legends (LoL) and Defense of the Ancients 2 (DOTA2). The finding is that base skills of in-game avatars, base skills of players, and players' champion-specific skills are three prominent skill components influencing LoL's match outcomes, while those of DOTA2 are mainly impacted by in-game avatars' base skills but not much by the other two.
  • PDF
    This paper addresses tracking of a moving target in a multi-agent network. The target follows a linear dynamics corrupted by an adversarial noise, i.e., the noise is not generated from a statistical distribution. The location of the target at each time induces a global time-varying loss function, and the global loss is a sum of local losses, each of which is associated to one agent. Agents noisy observations could be nonlinear. We formulate this problem as a distributed online optimization where agents communicate with each other to track the minimizer of the global loss. We then propose a decentralized version of the Mirror Descent algorithm and provide the non-asymptotic analysis of the problem. Using the notion of dynamic regret, we measure the performance of our algorithm versus its offline counterpart in the centralized setting. We prove that the bound on dynamic regret scales inversely in the network spectral gap, and it represents the adversarial noise causing deviation with respect to the linear dynamics. Our result subsumes a number of results in the distributed optimization literature. Finally, in a numerical experiment, we verify that our algorithm can be simply implemented for multi-agent tracking with nonlinear observations.
  • PDF
    We investigate the effects of social interactions in task al- location using Evolutionary Game Theory (EGT). We propose a simple task-allocation game and study how different learning mechanisms can give rise to specialised and non- specialised colonies under different ecological conditions. By combining agent-based simulations and adaptive dynamics we show that social learning can result in colonies of generalists or specialists, depending on ecological parameters. Agent-based simulations further show that learning dynamics play a crucial role in task allocation. In particular, introspective individual learning readily favours the emergence of specialists, while a process resembling task recruitment favours the emergence of generalists.
  • PDF
    Multi-agent path finding (MAPF) is well-studied in artificial intelligence, robotics, theoretical computer science and operations research. We discuss issues that arise when generalizing MAPF methods to real-world scenarios and four research directions that address them. We emphasize the importance of addressing these issues as opposed to developing faster methods for the standard formulation of the MAPF problem.
  • PDF
    Until now mean-field-type game theory was not focused on cognitively-plausible models of choices in humans, animals, machines, robots, software-defined and mobile devices strategic interactions. This work presents some effects of users' psychology in mean-field-type games. In addition to the traditional "material" payoff modelling, psychological patterns are introduced in order to better capture and understand behaviors that are observed in engineering practice or in experimental settings. The psychological payoff value depends upon choices, mean-field states, mean-field actions, empathy and beliefs. It is shown that the affective empathy enforces mean-field equilibrium payoff equity and improves fairness between the players. It establishes equilibrium systems for such interactive decision-making problems. Basic empathy concepts are illustrated in several important problems in engineering including resource sharing, packet collision minimization, energy markets, and forwarding in Device-to-Device communications. The work conducts also an experiment with 47 people who have to decide whether to cooperate or not. The basic Interpersonal Reactivity Index of empathy metrics were used to measure the empathy distribution of each participant. Android app called Empathizer is developed to analyze systematically the data obtained from the participants. The experimental results reveal that the dominated strategies of the classical game theory are not dominated any more when users' psychology is involved, and a significant level of cooperation is observed among the users who are positively partially empathetic.