Multiagent Systems (cs.MA)

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    A first step to reach Theory of Mind (ToM) abilities (attribution of beliefs to others) in synthetic agents through sensorimotor interactions, would be to tag sensory data with agent typology and action intentions: autonomous agent X moved an object under the box. We propose a dual arm robotic setup in which ToM could be probed. We then discuss what measures can be extracted from sensorimotor interaction data (based on a correlation analysis) in the proposed setup that allow to distinguish self than other and other/inanimate from other/active with intentions. We finally discuss what elements are missing in current cognitive architectures to be able to acquire ToM abilities in synthetic agents from sensorimotor interactions, bottom-up from reactive agent interaction behaviors and top-down from the optimization of social behaviour and cooperation.
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    Collective adaptive systems are an emerging class of networked computational systems, particularly suited in application domains such as smart cities, complex sensor networks, and the Internet of Things. These systems tend to feature large scale, heterogeneity of communication model (including opportunistic peer-to-peer wireless interaction), and require inherent self-adaptiveness properties to address unforeseen changes in operating conditions. In this context, it is extremely difficult (if not seemingly intractable) to engineer reusable pieces of distributed behaviour so as to make them provably correct and smoothly composable. Building on the field calculus, a computational model (and associated toolchain) capturing the notion of aggregate network-level computation, we address this problem with an engineering methodology coupling formal theory and computer simulation. On the one hand, functional properties are addressed by identifying the largest-to-date field calculus fragment generating self-stabilising behaviour, guaranteed to eventually attain a correct and stable final state despite any transient perturbation in state or topology, and including highly reusable building blocks for information spreading, aggregation, and time evolution. On the other hand, dynamical properties are addressed by simulation, empirically evaluating the different performances that can be obtained by switching between implementations of building blocks with provably equivalent functional properties. Overall, our methodology sheds light on how to identify core building blocks of collective behaviour, and how to select implementations that improve system performance while leaving overall system function and resiliency properties unchanged.
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    Although it is widely recognised that the presence of groups influences microscopic and aggregated pedestrian dynamics, a precise characterisation of the phenomenon still calls for evidences and insights. The present paper describes micro and macro level original analyses on data characterising pedestrian behaviour in presence of counter-flows and grouping, in particular dyads, acquired through controlled experiments. Results suggest that the presence of dyads and their tendency to walk in a line-abreast formation influences the formation of lanes and, in turn, aggregated observables, such as overall specific flow.
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    The Simple Temporal Problem (STP) is a fundamental temporal reasoning problem and has recently been extended to the Multiagent Simple Temporal Problem (MaSTP). In this paper we present a novel approach that is based on enforcing arc-consistency (AC) on the input (multiagent) simple temporal network. We show that the AC-based approach is sufficient for solving both the STP and MaSTP and provide efficient algorithms for them. As our AC-based approach does not impose new constraints between agents, it does not violate the privacy of the agents and is superior to the state-of-the-art approach to MaSTP. Empirical evaluations on diverse benchmark datasets also show that our AC-based algorithms for STP and MaSTP are significantly more efficient than existing approaches.
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    Stackelberg equilibria have become increasingly important as a solution concept in computational game theory, largely inspired by practical problems such as security settings. In practice, however, there is typically uncertainty regarding the model about the opponent. This paper is, to our knowledge, the first to investigate Stackelberg equilibria under uncertainty in extensive-form games, one of the broadest classes of game. We introduce robust Stackelberg equilibria, where the uncertainty is about the opponent's payoffs, as well as ones where the opponent has limited lookahead and the uncertainty is about the opponent's node evaluation function. We develop a new mixed-integer program for the deterministic limited-lookahead setting. We then extend the program to the robust setting for Stackelberg equilibrium under unlimited and under limited lookahead by the opponent. We show that for the specific case of interval uncertainty about the opponent's payoffs (or about the opponent's node evaluations in the case of limited lookahead), robust Stackelberg equilibria can be computed with a mixed-integer program that is of the same asymptotic size as that for the deterministic setting.
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    Multi-agent approach has become popular in computer science and technology. However, the conventional models of multi-agent and multicomponent systems implicitly or explicitly assume existence of absolute time or even do not include time in the set of defining parameters. At the same time, it is proved theoretically and validated experimentally that there are different times and time scales in a variety of real systems - physical, chemical, biological, social, informational, etc. Thus, the goal of this work is construction of a multi-agent multicomponent system models with concurrency of processes and diversity of actions. To achieve this goal, a mathematical system actor model is elaborated and its properties are studied.

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