Multiagent Systems (cs.MA)

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    Part I of this paper formulated a multitask optimization problem where agents in the network have individual objectives to meet, or individual parameter vectors to estimate, subject to a smoothness condition over the graph. A diffusion strategy was devised that responds to streaming data and employs stochastic approximations in place of actual gradient vectors, which are generally unavailable. The approach relied on minimizing a global cost consisting of the aggregate sum of individual costs regularized by a term that promotes smoothness. We examined the first-order, the second-order, and the fourth-order stability of the multitask learning algorithm. The results identified conditions on the step-size parameter, regularization strength, and data characteristics in order to ensure stability. This Part II examines steady-state performance of the strategy. The results reveal explicitly the influence of the network topology and the regularization strength on the network performance and provide insights into the design of effective multitask strategies for distributed inference over networks.
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    This paper formulates a multitask optimization problem where agents in the network have individual objectives to meet, or individual parameter vectors to estimate, subject to a smoothness condition over the graph. The smoothness condition softens the transition in the tasks among adjacent nodes and allows incorporating information about the graph structure into the solution of the inference problem. A diffusion strategy is devised that responds to streaming data and employs stochastic approximations in place of actual gradient vectors, which are generally unavailable. The approach relies on minimizing a global cost consisting of the aggregate sum of individual costs regularized by a term that promotes smoothness. We show in this Part I of the work, under conditions on the step-size parameter, that the adaptive strategy induces a contraction mapping and leads to small estimation errors on the order of the small step-size. The results in the accompanying Part II will reveal explicitly the influence of the network topology and the regularization strength on the network performance and will provide insights into the design of effective multitask strategies for distributed inference over networks.
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    The Swarmathon is a swarm robotics programming challenge that engages college students from minority-serving institutions in NASA's Journey to Mars. Teams compete by programming a group of robots to search for, pick up, and drop off resources in a collection zone. The Swarmathon produces prototypes for robot swarms that would collect resources on the surface of Mars. Robots operate completely autonomously with no global map, and each team's algorithm must be sufficiently flexible to effectively find resources from a variety of unknown distributions. The Swarmathon includes Physical and Virtual Competitions. Physical competitors test their algorithms on robots they build at their schools; they then upload their code to run autonomously on identical robots during the three day competition in an outdoor arena at Kennedy Space Center. Virtual competitors complete an identical challenge in simulation. Participants mentor local teams to compete in a separate High School Division. In the first 2 years, over 1,100 students participated. 63% of students were from underrepresented ethnic and racial groups. Participants had significant gains in both interest and core robotic competencies that were equivalent across gender and racial groups, suggesting that the Swarmathon is effectively educating a diverse population of future roboticists.
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    In this paper, we study the multi-robot task allocation problem where a group of robots needs to be allocated to a set of tasks so that the tasks can be finished optimally. One task may need more than one robot to finish it. Therefore the robots need to form coalitions to complete these tasks. Multi-robot coalition formation for task allocation is a well-known NP-hard problem. To solve this problem, we use a linear-programming based graph partitioning approach along with a region growing strategy which allocates (near) optimal robot coalitions to tasks in a negligible amount of time. Our proposed algorithm is fast (only taking 230 secs. for 100 robots and 10 tasks) and it also finds a near-optimal solution (up to 97.66% of the optimal). We have empirically demonstrated that the proposed approach in this paper always finds a solution which is closer (up to 9.1 times) to the optimal solution than a theoretical worst-case bound proved in an earlier work.
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    Consider a network of agents connected by communication links, where each agent holds a real value. The gossip problem consists in estimating the average of the values diffused in the network in a distributed manner. Current techniques for gossiping are designed to deal with worst-case scenarios, which is irrelevant in applications to distributed statistical learning and denoising in sensor networks. We design second-order gossip methods tailor-made for the case where the real values are i.i.d. samples from the same distribution. In some regular network structures, we are able to prove optimality of our methods, and simulations suggest that they are efficient in a wide range of random networks. Our approach of gossip stems from a new acceleration framework using the family of orthogonal polynomials with respect to the spectral measure of the network graph.
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    Multiagent coordination in cooperative multiagent systems (MASs) has been widely studied in both fixed-agent repeated interaction setting and the static social learning framework. However, two aspects of dynamics in real-world multiagent scenarios are currently missing in existing works. First, the network topologies can be dynamic where agents may change their connections through rewiring during the course of interactions. Second, the game matrix between each pair of agents may not be static and usually not known as a prior. Both the network dynamic and game uncertainty increase the coordination difficulty among agents. In this paper, we consider a multiagent dynamic social learning environment in which each agent can choose to rewire potential partners and interact with randomly chosen neighbors in each round. We propose an optimal rewiring strategy for agents to select most beneficial peers to interact with for the purpose of maximizing the accumulated payoff in repeated interactions. We empirically demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of our approach through comparing with benchmark strategies. The performance of three representative learning strategies under our social learning framework with our optimal rewiring is investigated as well.

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