Logic in Computer Science (cs.LO)

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    Theoretical computer science discusses foundational issues about computations. It asks and answers questions such as "What is a computation?", "What is computable?", "What is efficiently computable?","What is information?", "What is random?", "What is an algorithm?", etc. We will present many of the major themes and theorems with the basic language of category theory. Surprisingly, many interesting theorems and concepts of theoretical computer science are easy consequences of functoriality and composition when you look at the right categories and functors connecting them.
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    In this paper, we develop a game-theoretic account of concurrent separation logic. To every execution trace of the Code confronted to the Environment, we associate a specification game where Eve plays for the Code, and Adam for the Environment. The purpose of Eve and Adam is to decompose every intermediate machine state of the execution trace into three pieces: one piece for the Code, one piece for the Environment, and one piece for the available shared resources. We establish the soundness of concurrent separation logic by interpreting every derivation tree of the logic as a winning strategy of this specification game.
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    Assigning a satisfactory truly concurrent semantics to Petri nets with confusion and distributed decisions is a long standing problem, especially if one wants to fully replace nondeterminism with probability distributions and no stochastic structure is desired/allowed. Here we propose a general solution based on a recursive, static decomposition of (finite, occurrence) nets in loci of decision, called structural branching cells (s-cells). Each s-cell exposes a set of alternatives, called transactions, that can be equipped with a general probabilistic distribution. The solution is formalised as a transformation from a given Petri net to another net whose transitions are the transactions of the s-cells and whose places are the places of the original net, with some auxiliary structure for bookkeeping. The resulting net is confusion-free, namely if a transition is enabled, then all its conflicting alternatives are also enabled. Thus sets of conflicting alternatives can be equipped with probability distributions, while nonintersecting alternatives are purely concurrent and do not introduce any nondeterminism: they are Church-Rosser and their probability distributions are independent. The validity of the construction is witnessed by a tight correspondence result with the recent approach by Abbes and Benveniste (AB) based on recursively stopped configurations in event structures. Some advantages of our approach over AB's are that: i) s-cells are defined statically and locally in a compositional way, whereas AB's branching cells are defined dynamically and globally; ii) their recursively stopped configurations correspond to possible executions, but the existing concurrency is not made explicit. Instead, our resulting nets are equipped with an original concurrency structure exhibiting a so-called complete concurrency property.
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    The Refinement Calculus of Reactive Systems (RCRS) is a compositional formal framework for modeling and reasoning about reactive systems. RCRS provides a language which allows to describe atomic components as symbolic transition systems or QLTL formulas, and composite components formed using three primitive composition operators: serial, parallel, and feedback. The semantics of the language is given in terms of monotonic property transformers, an extension to reactive systems of monotonic predicate transformers which have been used to give compositional semantics to sequential programs. RCRS allows to specify both safety and liveness properties. It also allows to model input-output systems which are both non-deterministic and non-input-receptive (i.e., which may reject some inputs at some points in time), and can thus be seen as a behavioral type system. RCRS provides a set of techniques for symbolic computer-aided reasoning, including compositional static analysis and verification. RCRS comes with an open-source implementation built on top of the Isabelle theorem prover.
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    A number of high-level languages and libraries have been proposed that offer novel and simple to use abstractions for concurrent, asynchronous, and distributed programming. The execution models that realise them, however, often change over time---whether to improve performance, or to extend them to new language features---potentially affecting behavioural and safety properties of existing programs. This is exemplified by SCOOP, a message-passing approach to concurrent object-oriented programming that has seen multiple changes proposed and implemented, with demonstrable consequences for an idiomatic usage of its core abstraction. We propose a semantics comparison workbench for SCOOP with fully and semi-automatic tools for analysing and comparing the state spaces of programs with respect to different execution models or semantics. We demonstrate its use in checking the consistency of properties across semantics by applying it to a set of representative programs, and highlighting a deadlock-related discrepancy between the principal execution models of SCOOP. Furthermore, we demonstrate the extensibility of the workbench by generalising the formalisation of an execution model to support recently proposed extensions for distributed programming. Our workbench is based on a modular and parameterisable graph transformation semantics implemented in the GROOVE tool. We discuss how graph transformations are leveraged to atomically model intricate language abstractions, how the visual yet algebraic nature of the model can be used to ascertain soundness, and highlight how the approach could be applied to similar languages.
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    Learning from expert demonstrations has received a lot of attention in artificial intelligence and machine learning. The goal is to infer the underlying reward function that an agent is optimizing given a set of observations of the agent's behavior over time in a variety of circumstances, the system state trajectories, and a plant model specifying the evolution of the system state for different agent's actions. The system is often modeled as a Markov decision process, that is, the next state depends only on the current state and agent's action, and the the agent's choice of action depends only on the current state. While the former is a Markovian assumption on the evolution of system state, the later assumes that the target reward function is itself Markovian. In this work, we explore learning a class of non-Markovian reward functions, known in the formal methods literature as specifications. These specifications offer better composition, transferability, and interpretability. We then show that inferring the specification can be done efficiently without unrolling the transition system. We demonstrate on a 2-d grid world example.
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    The paper reports on some results concerning Aqvist's dyadic logic known as system G, which is one of the most influential logics for reasoning with dyadic obligations ("it ought to be the case that ... if it is the case that ..."). Although this logic has been known in the literature for a while, many of its properties still await in-depth consideration. In this short paper we show: that any formula in system G including nested modal operators is equivalent to some formula with no nesting; that the universal modality introduced by Aqvist in the first presentation of the system is definable in terms of the deontic modality.
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    In this position paper we discuss three main shortcomings of existing approaches to counterfactual causality from the computer science perspective, and sketch lines of work to try and overcome these issues: (1) causality definitions should be driven by a set of precisely specified requirements rather than specific examples; (2) causality frameworks should support system dynamics; (3) causality analysis should have a well-understood behavior in presence of abstraction.
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    Model checking is usually based on a comprehensive traversal of the state space. Causality-based model checking is a radically different approach that instead analyzes the cause-effect relationships in a program. We give an overview on a new class of model checking algorithms that capture the causal relationships in a special data structure called concurrent traces. Concurrent traces identify key events in an execution history and link them through their cause-effect relationships. The model checker builds a tableau of concurrent traces, where the case splits represent different causal explanations of a hypothetical error. Causality-based model checking has been implemented in the ARCTOR tool, and applied to previously intractable multi-threaded benchmarks.
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    One of the key challenges when looking for the causes of a complex event is to determine the causal status of factors that are neither individually necessary nor individually sufficient to produce that event. In order to reason about how such factors should be taken into account, we need a vocabulary to distinguish different cases. In philosophy, the concept of overdetermination and the concept of preemption serve an important purpose in this regard, although their exact meaning tends to remain elusive. In this paper, I provide theory-neutral definitions of these concepts using structural equations in the Halpern-Pearl tradition. While my definitions do not presuppose any particular causal theory, they take such a theory as a variable parameter. This enables us to specify formal constraints on theories of causality, in terms of a pre-theoretic understanding of what preemption and overdetermination actually mean. I demonstrate the usefulness of this by presenting and arguing for what I call the principle of presumption. Roughly speaking, this principle states that a possible cause can only be regarded as having been preempted if there is independent evidence to support such an inference. I conclude by showing that the principle of presumption is violated by the two main theories of causality formulated in the Halpern-Pearl tradition. The paper concludes by defining the class of empirical causal theories, characterised in terms of a fixed-point of counterfactual reasoning about difference-making. It is argued that theories of actual causality ought to be empirical.
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    This research started with an algebra for reasoning about rely/guarantee concurrency for a shared memory model. The approach taken led to a more abstract algebra of atomic steps, in which atomic steps synchronise (rather than interleave) when composed in parallel. The algebra of rely/guarantee concurrency then becomes an instantiation of the more abstract algebra. Many of the core properties needed for rely/guarantee reasoning can be shown to hold in the abstract algebra where their proofs are simpler and hence allow a higher degree of automation. The algebra has been encoded in Isabelle/HOL to provide a basis for tool support for program verification. In rely/guarantee concurrency, programs are specified to guarantee certain behaviours until assumptions about the behaviour of their environment are violated. When assumptions are violated, program behaviour is unconstrained (aborting), and guarantees need no longer hold. To support these guarantees a second synchronous operator, weak conjunction, was introduced: both processes in a weak conjunction must agree to take each atomic step, unless one aborts in which case the whole aborts. In developing the laws for parallel and weak conjunction we found many properties were shared by the operators and that the proofs of many laws were essentially the same. This insight led to the idea of generalising synchronisation to an abstract operator with only the axioms that are shared by the parallel and weak conjunction operator, so that those two operators can be viewed as instantiations of the abstract synchronisation operator. The main differences between parallel and weak conjunction are how they combine individual atomic steps; that is left open in the axioms for the abstract operator.
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    We study the problem of formal verification of Binarized Neural Networks (BNN), which have recently been proposed as a power-efficient alternative to more traditional learning networks. More precisely, given a trained BNN and a relation between possible inputs and outputs of this BNN, we develop verification procedures for establishing that the BNN indeed meets this specification for all possible inputs. For solving the verification problem of BNNs we build on well-known methods for hardware verification.The BNN verification problem is first encoded as a combinational miter. In a second step this miter is then transformed into a corresponding propositional satisfiability (SAT) problem. The main contributions of this paper are a number of essential optimizations for making this approach to BNN verification scalable. First, we provide a transformation on fully conntected BNNs for reducing the order of the number of bitwise operations in each layer of the BNN from quadratic to linear. Second, we are identifying redundant computations in a BNN based on \em optimal factoring techniques, and we provide transformations on BNNs for avoiding these multiple computations. We prove that the problem of optimal factoring is NP-hard, and we design efficient search procedures for generating approximate solutions of the optimal factoring problem. Third, we design a compositional verification procedure for analyzing each layer of a BNN separately, and for iteratively combining and refining local verification results. We experimentally demonstrate the scalability of our verification techniques to moderately-sized BNNs for embedded applications with thousands of neurons and inputs.
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    The second international CREST workshop continued the focus of the first CREST workshop: addressing approaches to causal reasoning in engineering complex embedded and safety-critical systems. Relevant approaches to causal reasoning have been (usually independently) proposed by a variety of communities: AI, concurrency, model-based diagnosis, software engineering, security engineering, and formal methods. The goal of CREST is to bring together researchers and practitioners from these communities to exchange ideas, especially between communities, in order to advance the science of determining root cause(s) for failures of critical systems. The growing complexity of failures such as power grid blackouts, airplane crashes, security and privacy violations, and malfunctioning medical devices or automotive systems makes the goals of CREST more relevant than ever before.
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    This paper reports on the QBF solver QFUN that has won the non-CNF track in the recent QBF evaluation. The solver is motivated by the fact that it is easy to construct Quantified Boolean Formulas (QBFs) with short winning strategies (Skolem/Herbrand functions) but are hard to solve by nowadays solvers. This paper argues that a solver benefits from generalizing a set of individual wins into a strategy. This idea is realized on top of the competitive RAReQS algorithm by utilizing machine learning. The results of the implemented prototype are highly encouraging.
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    We prove a generic completeness result for a class of modal fixpoint logics corresponding to flat fragments of the two-way mu-calculus, extending earlier work by Santocanale and Venema. We observe that Santocanale and Venema's proof that least fixpoints in the Lindenbaum-Tarski algebra of certain flat fixpoint logics are constructive, using finitary adjoints, no longer works when the converse modality is introduced. Instead, our completeness proof directly constructs a model for a consistent formula, using the induction rule in a way that is similar to the standard completeness proof for propositional dynamic logic. This approach is combined with the concept of a focus, which has previously been used in tableau based reasoning for modal fixpoint logics.
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    We study VC-dimension of short formulas in Presburger Arithmetic, defined to have a bounded number of variables, quantifiers and atoms. We give both lower and upper bounds, which are tight up to a polynomial factor in the bit length of the formula.
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    We prove that the Büchi topology, the automatic topology, the alphabetic topology and the strong alphabetic topology are Polish, and provideconsequences of this. We also show that this cannot be fully extended to the case of a space of infinite labelled binary trees; in particular the Büchi and the Muller topologies in that case are not Polish.
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    Calculi of string diagrams are increasingly used to present the syntax and algebraic structure of various families of circuits, including signal flow graphs, electrical circuits and quantum processes. In many such approaches, the semantic interpretation for diagrams is given in terms of relations or corelations (generalised equivalence relations) of some kind. In this paper we show how semantic categories of both relations and corelations can be characterised as colimits of simpler categories. This modular perspective is important as it simplifies the task of giving a complete axiomatisation for semantic equivalence of string diagrams. Moreover, our general result unifies various theorems that are independently found in literature and are relevant for program semantics, quantum computation and control theory.
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    A famous result due to Ko and Friedman (1982) asserts that the problems of integration and maximisation of a univariate real function are computationally hard in a well-defined sense. Yet, both functionals are routinely computed at great speed in practice. We aim to resolve this apparent paradox by studying classes of functions which can be feasibly integrated and maximised, together with representations for these classes of functions which encode the information which is necessary to uniformly compute integral and maximum in polynomial time. The theoretical framework for this is the second-order complexity theory for operators in analysis which was recently introduced by Kawamura and Cook (2012). The representations we study are based on rigorous approximation by polynomials, piecewise polynomials, and rational functions. We compare these representations with respect to polytime reducibility as well as with respect to their ability to quickly evaluate symbolic expressions in a given language. We show that the representation based on rigorous approximation by piecewise polynomials is polytime equivalent to the representation based on rigorous approximation by rational functions. With this representation, all terms in a certain language, which is expressive enough to contain the maximum and integral of most functions of practical interest, can be evaluated in polynomial time. By contrast, both the representation based on polynomial approximation and the standard representation based on function evaluation, which implicitly underlies the Ko-Friedman result, require exponential time to evaluate certain terms in this language. We confirm our theoretical results by an implementation in Haskell, which provides some evidence that second-order polynomial time computability is similarly closely tied with practical feasibility as its first-order counterpart.
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    The goal of this paper is to advance an extensible theory of living systems using an approach to biomathematics and biocomputation that suitably addresses self-organized, self-referential and anticipatory systems with multi-temporal multi-agents. Our first step is to provide foundations for modelling of emergent and evolving dynamic multi-level organic complexes and their sustentative processes in artificial and natural life systems. Main applications are in life sciences, medicine, ecology and astrobiology, as well as robotics, industrial automation and man-machine interface. Since 2011 over 100 scientists from a number of disciplines have been exploring a substantial set of theoretical frameworks for a comprehensive theory of life known as Integral Biomathics. That effort identified the need for a robust core model of organisms as dynamic wholes, using advanced and adequately computable mathematics. The work described here for that core combines the advantages of a situation and context aware multivalent computational logic for active self-organizing networks, Wandering Logic Intelligence (WLI), and a multi-scale dynamic category theory, Memory Evolutive Systems (MES), hence WLIMES. This is presented to the modeller via a formal augmented reality language as a first step towards practical modelling and simulation of multi-level living systems. Initial work focuses on the design and implementation of this visual language and calculus (VLC) and its graphical user interface. The results will be integrated within the current methodology and practices of theoretical biology and (personalized) medicine to deepen and to enhance the holistic understanding of life.
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    General-valued constraint satisfaction problems (VCSPs) are generalisations of CSPs dealing with homomorphisms between two valued structures. We study the complexity of structural restrictions for VCSPs, that is, restrictions defined by classes of admissible left-hand side valued structures. As our main result, we show that for VCSPs of bounded arity the only tractable structural restrictions are those of bounded treewidth modulo valued equivalence, thus identifying the precise borderline of tractability. Our result generalises a result of Dalmau, Kolaitis, and Vardi [CP'02] and Grohe [JACM'07] showing that for CSPs of bounded arity the tractable restrictions are precisely those with bounded treewidth modulo homomorphic equivalence. All the tractable restrictions we identify are solved by the well-known Sherali-Adams LP hierarchy. We take a closer look into this hierarchy and study the power of Sherali-Adams for solving VCSPs. Our second result is a precise characterisation of the left-hand side valued structures solved to optimality by the $k$-th level of the Sherali-Adams LP hierarchy.
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    Recently, J. D. Lawson encouraged the domain theory community to consider the scientific program of developing domain theory in the wider context of $T_0$ spaces instead of restricting to posets. In this paper, we respond to this calling with an attempt to formulate a topological version of the Scott Convergence Theorem, i.e., order-theoretic characterisation of those posets for which the Scott-convergence, $\mathcal{S}$, is topological. To do this, we make use of the so-called Zhao-Ho's replacement principle to create topological analogues of well-known domain-theoretic concepts, e.g., $\operatorname{Irr}$-continuous space is to continuous poset, as $\mathcal{I}$-convergence is to $\mathcal{S}$-convergence. In this paper, we want to highlight the difficulties involved in our attempt because of the much more general ambient environment (of $T_0$ spaces) we are working in. To tackle each of these difficulties, we introduce a new type of $T_0$ spaces to overcome it. In this paper, we consider two novel topological concepts, namely, the balanced spaces and the nice spaces, and as a result we obtain some necessary (respectively, sufficient) condition for which the new convergence structure, $\mathcal{I}$, is topological.
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    Stone-type duality theorems, which relate algebraic and relational/topological models, are important tools in logic because they strengthen soundness and completeness to a categorical equivalence, yielding a framework through which both algebraic and topological methods can be brought to bear on a logic. We give a systematic treatment of Stone-type duality for the structures that interpret bunched logics, starting with the weakest systems, recovering the familiar BI and Boolean BI, and extending to both classical and intuitionistic Separation Logic. We demonstrate the uniformity of this analysis by additionally capturing the bunched logics obtained by extending BI and BBI with multiplicative connectives corresponding to disjunction, negation and falsum: De Morgan BI, Classical BI, and the sub-classical family of logics extending Bi-intuitionistic (B)BI. We additionally recover soundness and completeness theorems for the specific truth-functional models of these logics as presented in the literature, with new results given for DMBI, the sub-classical logics extending BiBI and a new bunched logic, CKBI, inspired by the interpretation of Concurrent Separation Logic in concurrent Kleene algebra. This approach synthesises a variety of techniques from modal, substructural and categorical logic and contextualizes the `resource semantics' interpretation underpinning Separation Logic amongst them. As a consequence, theory from those fields - as well as algebraic and topological methods - can be applied to both Separation Logic and the systems of bunched logics it is built upon. Conversely, the notion of indexed frame (generalizing the standard memory model of Separation Logic) and its associated completeness proof can easily be adapted to other non-classical predicate logics.
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    We give a concise presentation of the Univalent Foundations of mathematics underlining the main ideas (section 1), followed by a discussion of the large-scale UniMath library of formalized mathematics implementing the ideas of the Univalent Foundations, and the challenges one faces in designing such a library (section 2). This leads us to a general discussion about the links between architecture and mathematics (section 3).
  • Oct 10 2017 cs.LO arXiv:1710.02594v1
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    Dependent types provide a lightweight and modular means to integrate programming and formal program verification. In particular, the types of programs written in dependently typed programming languages (Agda, Idris, F*, etc.) can be used to express specifications of program correctness. These specifications can vary from being as simple as requiring the divisor in the division function to be non-zero, to as complex as specifying the correctness of compilers of industrial-strength languages. Successful compilation of a program then guarantees that it satisfies its type-based specification. While dependent types allow many runtime errors to be eliminated by rejecting erroneous programs at compile-time, dependently typed languages are yet to gain popularity in the wider programming community. One reason for this is their limited support for computational effects, an integral part of all widely used programming languages, ranging from imperative languages, such as C, to functional languages, such as ML and Haskell. For example, in addition to simply turning their inputs to outputs, programs written in these programming languages can raise exceptions, access computer's memory, communicate over a network, render images on a screen, etc. Therefore, if dependently typed programming languages are to truly live up to their promise of seamlessly integrating programming and formal program verification, we must first understand how to properly account for computational effects in such languages. While there already exists work on this topic, ingredients needed for a comprehensive theory are generally missing. For example, foundations are often not settled; available effects may be limited; or effects may not be treated systematically. In this thesis we address these shortcomings by providing a comprehensive treatment of the combination of dependent types and general computational effects.

Recent comments

Zoltán Zimborás May 28 2014 04:42 UTC

It's a bit funny to look at a formally verified proof of the CLT :), here it is online:
https://github.com/avigad/isabelle.