Logic in Computer Science (cs.LO)

  • PDF
    The search for increased trustworthiness of SAT solvers is very active and uses various methods. Some of these methods obtain a proof from the provers then check it, normally by replicating the search based on the proof's information. Because the certification process involves another nontrivial proof search, the trust we can place in it is decreased. Some attempts to amend this use certifiers which have been verified by proofs assistants such as Isabelle/HOL and Coq. Our approach is different because it is based on an extremely simplified certifier. This certifier enjoys a very high level of trust but is very inefficient. In this paper, we experiment with this approach and conclude that by placing some restrictions on the formats, one can mostly eliminate the need for search and in principle, can certify proofs of arbitrary size.
  • PDF
    We develop a method to incrementally construct programming languages. Our approach is categorical: each layer of the language is described as a monad. Our method either (i) concretely builds a distributive law between two monads, i.e. layers of the language, which then provides a monad structure to the composition of layers, or (ii) identifies precisely the algebraic obstacles to the existence of a distributive law and gives a best approximant language. The running example will involve three layers: a basic imperative language enriched first by adding non-determinism and then probabilistic choice. The first extension works seamlessly, but the second encounters an obstacle, which results in a best approximant language structurally very similar to the probabilistic network specification language ProbNetKAT.
  • PDF
    Complex Event Recognition (CER for short) refers to the activity of detecting patterns in streams of continuously arriving data. This field has been traditionally approached from a practical point of view, resulting in heterogeneous implementations with fundamentally different capabilities. The main reason behind this is that defining formal semantics for a CER language is not trivial: they usually combine first-order variables for joining and filtering events with regular operators like sequencing and Kleene closure. Moreover, their semantics usually focus only on the detection of complex events, leaving the concept of output mostly unattended. In this paper, we propose to unify the semantics and output of complex event recognition languages by using second order objects. Specifically, we introduce a CER language called Second Order Complex Event Logic (SO-CEL for short), that uses second order variables for managing and outputting sequences of events. This makes the definition of the main CER operators simple, allowing us to develop the first steps in understanding its expressive power. We start by comparing SO-CEL with a version that uses first-order variables called FO-CEL, showing that they are equivalent in expressive power when restricted to unary predicates but, surprisingly, incomparable in general. Nevertheless, we show that if we restrict to sets of binary predicates, then SO-CEL is strictly more expressive than FO-CEL. Then, we introduce a natural computational model called Unary Complex Event Automata (UCEA) that provides a better understanding of SO-CEL. We show that, under unary predicates, SO-CEL captures the subclass of UCEA that satisfy the so-called *-property. Finally, we identify the operations that SO-CEL is lacking to capture UCEA and introduce a natural extension of the language that captures the complete class of UCEA under unary predicates.
  • PDF
    This volume of EPTCS contains the proceedings of the Fifth Workshop on Proof Exchange for Theorem Proving (PxTP 2017), held on September 23-24, 2017 as part of the Tableaux, FroCoS and ITP conferences in Brasilia, Brazil. The PxTP workshop series brings together researchers working on various aspects of communication, integration, and cooperation between reasoning systems and formalisms, with a special focus on proofs. The progress in computer-aided reasoning, both automated and interactive, during the past decades, made it possible to build deduction tools that are increasingly more applicable to a wider range of problems and are able to tackle larger problems progressively faster. In recent years, cooperation between such tools in larger systems has demonstrated the potential to reduce the amount of manual intervention. Cooperation between reasoning systems relies on availability of theoretical formalisms and practical tools to exchange problems, proofs, and models. The PxTP workshop series strives to encourage such cooperation by inviting contributions on all aspects of cooperation between reasoning tools, whether automatic or interactive.
  • PDF
    Dynamic fault trees (DFTs) have emerged as an important tool for capturing the dynamic behavior of system failure. These DFTs are then analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively using stochastic or algebraic methods to judge the failure characteristics of the given system in terms of the failures of its sub-components. Model checking has been recently proposed to conduct the failure analysis of systems using DFTs with the motivation to provide a rigorous failure analysis of safety-critical systems. However, model checking has not been used for the DFT qualitative analysis and the reduction algorithms used in model checking are usually not formally verified. Moreover, the analysis time grows exponentially with the increase of the number of states. These issues limit the usefulness of model checking for analyzing complex systems used in safety-critical domains, where the accuracy and completeness of analysis matters the most. To overcome these limitations, we propose a comprehensive methodology to perform the qualitative and quantitative analysis of DFTs using an integration of theorem proving and model checking based approaches. For this purpose, we formalized all the basic dynamic fault tree gates using higher-order logic based on the algebraic approach and formally verified some of the simplification properties. This formalization allows us to formally verify the equivalence between the original and reduced DFTs using a theorem prover, and conduct the qualitative analysis. We then use model checking to perform the quantitative analysis of the formally verified reduced DFT. We applied our methodology to five benchmarks and the results show that the formally verified reduced DFT was analyzed using model checking with up to six times less states and up to 133000 times faster.
  • PDF
    Given a first-order sentence, a model-checking computation tests whether the sentence holds true in a given finite structure. Data provenance extracts from this computation an abstraction of the manner in which its result depends on the data items that describe the model. Previous work on provenance was, to a large extent, restricted to the negation-free fragment of first-order logic and showed how provenance abstractions can be usefully described as elements of commutative semirings --- most generally as multivariate polynomials with positive integer coefficients. In this paper we introduce a novel approach to dealing with negation and a corresponding commutative semiring of polynomials with dual indeterminates. These polynomials are used to perform reverse provenance analysis, i.e., finding models that satisfy various properties under given provenance tracking assumptions.
  • PDF
    This is the third in a series of papers extending Martin-Löf's meaning explanations of dependent type theory to a Cartesian cubical realizability framework that accounts for higher-dimensional types. We extend this framework to include a cumulative hierarchy of univalent Kan universes of Kan types, exact equality and other pretypes lacking Kan structure, and a cumulative hierarchy of pretype universes. As in Parts I and II, the main result is a canonicity theorem stating that closed terms of boolean type evaluate to either true or false. This establishes the computational interpretation of Cartesian cubical higher type theory based on cubical programs equipped with a deterministic operational semantics.
  • PDF
    In this paper we present a counter-example guided abstraction and approximation refinement (CEGAAR) technique for \em partial predicate abstraction, which combines predicate abstraction and fixpoint approximations for model checking infinite-state systems. The proposed approach incrementally considers growing sets of predicates for abstraction refinement. The novelty of the approach stems from recognizing source of the imprecision: abstraction or approximation. We use Craig interpolation to deal with imprecision due to abstraction. In the case of imprecision due to approximation, we delay application of the approximation. Our experimental results on a variety of models provide insights into effectiveness of partial predicate abstraction as well as refinement techniques in this context.
  • PDF
    We present a new soundness proof of Concurrent Separation Logic (CSL) based on a structural operational semantics (SOS). We build on two previous proofs and develop new auxiliary notions to achieve the goal. One uses a denotational semantics (based on traces). The other is based on SOS, but was obtained only for a fragment of the logic - the Disjoint CSL - which disallows modifying shared variables between concurrent threads. In this work, we lift such a restriction, proving the soundness of full CSL with respect to a SOS. Thus contributing to the development of tools able of ensuring the correctness of realistic concurrent programs. Moreover, given that we used SOS, such tools can be well-integrated in programming environments and even incorporated in compilers.
  • PDF
    Translating expressions between different logics and theorem provers is notoriously and often prohibitively difficult, due to the large differences between the logical foundations, the implementations of the systems, and the structure of the respective libraries. Practical solutions for exchanging theorems across theorem provers have remained both weak and brittle. Consequently, libraries are not easily reusable across systems, and substantial effort must be spent on reformalizing and proving basic results in each system. Notably, this problem exists already if we only try to exchange theorem statements and forgo exchanging proofs. In previous work we introduced alignments as a lightweight standard for relating concepts across libraries and conjectured that it would provide a good base for translating expressions. In this paper, we demonstrate the feasibility of this approach. We use a foundationally uncommitted framework to write interface theories that abstract from logical foundation, implementation, and library structure. Then we use alignments to record how the concepts in the interface theories are realized in several major proof assistant libraries, and we use that information to translate expressions across libraries. Concretely, we present exemplary interface theories for several areas of mathematics and - in total - several hundred alignments that were found manually.
  • PDF
    Quite often, verification tasks for distributed systems are accomplished via counter abstractions. Such abstractions can sometimes be justified via simulations and bisimulations. In this work, we supply logical foundations to this practice, by a specifically designed technique for second order quantifier elimination. Our method, once applied to specifications of verification problems for parameterized distributed systems, produces integer variables systems that are ready to be model-checked by current SMT-based tools. We demonstrate the feasibility of the approach with a prototype implementation and first experiments.
  • PDF
    Satisfiability modulo theories (SMT) solvers have throughout the years been able to cope with increasingly expressive formulas, from ground logics to full first-order logic modulo theories. Nevertheless, higher-order logic within SMT is still little explored. One main goal of the Matryoshka project, which started in March 2017, is to extend the reasoning capabilities of SMT solvers and other automatic provers beyond first-order logic. In this preliminary report, we report on an extension of the SMT-LIB language, the standard input format of SMT solvers, to handle higher-order constructs. We also discuss how to augment the proof format of the SMT solver veriT to accommodate these new constructs and the solving techniques they require.
  • PDF
    We describe the first results of a project of analyzing in which theories formal proofs can be ex- pressed. We use this analysis as the basis of interoperability between proof systems.
  • PDF
    JKind is an open-source industrial model checker developed by Rockwell Collins and the University of Minnesota. JKind uses multiple parallel engines to prove or falsify safety properties of infinite state models. It is performance competitive with other state-of-the-art model checkers and serves as the back-end for various industrial applications.
  • PDF
    After surveying classical results, we introduce a generalized notion of inference system to support structural recursion on non-well-founded data types. Besides axioms and inference rules with the usual meaning, a generalized inference system allows coaxioms, which are, intuitively, axioms which can only be applied "at infinite depth" in a proof tree. This notion nicely subsumes standard inference systems and their inductive and coinductive interpretation, while providing more flexibility. Indeed, the classical results can be extended to our generalized framework, interpreting recursive definitions as fixed points which are not necessarily the least, nor the greatest one. This allows formal reasoning in cases where the inductive and coinductive interpretation do not provide the intended meaning, or are mixed together.
  • PDF
    A correspondence between database tuples as causes for query answers in databases and tuple-based repairs of inconsistent databases with respect to denial constraints has already been established. In this work, answer-set programs that specify repairs of databases are used as a basis for solving computational and reasoning problems about causes. Here, causes are also introduced at the attribute level by appealing to a both null-based and attribute-based repair semantics. The corresponding repair programs are presented, and they are used as a basis for computation and reasoning about attribute-level causes.
  • PDF
    We propose a hybrid architecture for systematically computing robust visual explanation(s) encompassing hypothesis formation, belief revision, and default reasoning with video data. The architecture consists of two tightly integrated synergistic components: (1) (functional) answer set programming based abductive reasoning with space-time tracklets as native entities; and (2) a visual processing pipeline for detection based object tracking and motion analysis. We present the formal framework, its general implementation as a (declarative) method in answer set programming, and an example application and evaluation based on two diverse video datasets: the MOTChallenge benchmark developed by the vision community, and a recently developed Movie Dataset.
  • PDF
    Let L be some extension of classical propositional logic. The non-iterated probabilistic logic over L, is the logic PL that is defined by adding non-nested probabilistic operators in the language of L. For example in PL we can express a statement like "the probability of truthfulness of A is at 0.3" where A is a formula of L. The iterated probabilistic logic over L is the logic PPL, where the probabilistic operators may be iterated (nested). For example, in PPL we can express a statement like "this coin is counterfeit with probability 0.6". In this paper we investigate the influence of probabilistic operators in the complexity of satisfiability in PL and PPL. We obtain complexity bounds, for the aforementioned satisfiability problem, which are parameterized in the complexity of satisfiability of conjunctions of positive and negative formulas that have neither a probabilistic nor a classical operator as a top-connective. As an application of our results we obtain tight complexity bounds for the satisfiability problem in PL and PPL when L is classical propositional logic or justification logic.
  • PDF
    We present HySIA: a reliable runtime verification tool for nonlinear hybrid automata (HA) and signal temporal logic (STL) properties. HySIA simulates an HA with interval analysis techniques so that a trajectory is enclosed sharply within a set of intervals. Then, HySIA computes whether the simulated trajectory satisfies a given STL property; the computation is performed again with interval analysis to achieve reliability. Simulation and verification using HySIA are demonstrated through several example HA and STL formulas.
  • PDF
    Reactive synthesis for the GR(1) fragment of LTL has been implemented and studied in many works. In this workshop paper we present and evaluate a list of heuristics to potentially reduce running times for GR(1) synthesis and related algorithms. The list includes early detection of fixed-points and unrealizability, fixed-point recycling, and heuristics for unrealizable core computations. We evaluate the presented heuristics on SYNTECH15, a total of 78 specifications of 6 autonomous Lego robots, written by 3rd year undergraduate computer science students in a project class we have taught, as well as on several benchmarks from the literature. The evaluation investigates not only the potential of the suggested heuristics to improve computation times, but also the difference between existing benchmarks and the robot's specifications in terms of the effectiveness of the heuristics.

Recent comments

Zoltán Zimborás May 28 2014 04:42 UTC

It's a bit funny to look at a formally verified proof of the CLT :), here it is online:
https://github.com/avigad/isabelle.